Attack synonyms

ə-tăk'
Category:
Part of speech:
A rigorous or energetic effort to accomplish something difficult:
10
1
An exercise performed by stepping forward one leg while kneeling with the other leg, then returning back to a standing position.
10
1
A large quantity of people or things resembling an attack.
10
2
A work stoppage (otherwise concerted stoppage of an activity) as a form of protest
5
1
(Idiomatic) To begin firing (weapons) at something or someone.
4
0
A hostile act or military attack:
2
0
Offensive tactical action
2
0
Expense; cost:
2
1
(Countable, military) An attack.
2
2
The action of irrupting or breaking into; a violent entry or invasion; an inbreaking; an intrusion.
1
0
A breaking out; sudden occurrence, as of disease or war
1
0
Offensive tactical action
1
0
The act by which something is stormed.
1
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
1
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
1
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
1
0
To attack, damage, or destroy with or as with a torpedo
1
0
To use force or threat of force to compel (another person) to submit to sexual intercourse or other sexual penetration.
1
0
To handle verbally or in some form of artistic expression; to address or discuss as a subject.
1
0
To repress; to struggle to repress.
1
0
(Uncountable) The practice or habit of committing crimes.
1
0
Any violation of the law for which the judicial code demands there be a penalty, including misdemeanors and felonies. See also crime.
1
1
An attack; assault
1
1
Using, containing, or marked by harshly critical or irate language.
1
1
The definition of a raid is a surprise attack or surprise visit, especially when done by the military during war or by police to arrest suspects.
1
2
The definition of a push is the act of putting pressure on someone or something to get action.
0
0
(Rare) An assault; an attack.
0
0
A vigorous or abusive attack in words, esp. in a newspaper
0
0
The bullets, arrows, etc. discharged in this way
0
0
(Countable) An instance of shooting (a person) with a gun.
0
0
The definition of barrage is a large volume of something, or a huge amount of things happening all at once.
0
0
(Physics) the incidence of an intense stream of high-energy particles directed at a substance
0
0
A simultaneous or rapid and continuous discharge of many firearms
0
0
A harsh verbal or physical attack.
0
0
(Obsolete) A seat, especially a throne.
0
0
Fuel for a fire
0
0
(Law) Any of various torts involving interference to another's enjoyment of his property, especially the act of being present on another's land without lawful excuse.
0
0
The force that maintains a blockade
0
0
A structure or covering of boards
0
0
Offensive tactical action
0
0
Offensive tactical action
0
0
The right of a group of citizens to introduce a matter for legislation either to the legislature or directly to the voters
0
0
A military action consisting of armed forces of one geopolitical entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of conquering territory or altering the established government.
0
0
An aggressive entrance into foreign territory; a raid or invasion.
0
0
Offensive tactical action
0
0
The forcible inclusion or entry of an external group or individual; the act of intruding.
0
0
An orchestrated attempt to convince somebody to seek professional help and/or change their bahaviour with an addiction or other psychological problem.
0
0
Offensive tactical action
0
0
An advance, especially at another's expense; an encroachment:
0
0
(Law) An unlawful diminution of the possessions of another.
0
0
US spelling of counter-attack.
0
0
Anything that gives an unflattering or damaging picture of the subject with which it is dealing
0
0
The reporting of a person to the authorities for possible criminal prosecution.
0
0
The act of blaming, criticizing, or condemning as wrong; reprehension.
0
0
A sudden attack, spasm, or convulsion, as in epilepsy or another disorder.
0
0
A sudden, involuntary mental experience:
0
0
A period of time spent in a particular way; a spell:
0
0
The act or situation of relapsing.
0
0
A quick violent robbery of a person, usually in a public place.
0
0
To enter by force in order to conquer or pillage:
0
0
A low-pressure atmospheric disturbance resulting in strong winds accompanied by rain, snow, or other precipitation and often by thunder and lightning.
0
0
To accelerate the growth or progress of; to further; to forward; to help on; to aid; to heighten.
0
0
To attack, especially from all sides
0
0
The definition of besiege is to surround, crowd around or overwhelm.
0
0
To besiege by encircling, as with an army
0
0
To form a circle around; surround:
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To attack, to harass.
0
0
To attack by ambush; to waylay.
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
The definition of bombard is to attack continuously or repeatedly.
0
0
To attack, damage, or destroy with a bomb or bombs
0
0
To fall on; to experience; to suffer.
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To spread out into the shape of a fan
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To approach someone in a very determined way.
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To attack (ground troops, for example) with a machine gun or cannon from a low-flying aircraft.
0
0
To interrupt the course or progress of:
0
0
To set upon; to attack.
0
0
Engage is defined as to get someone interested in something or to have a conversation or discussion with someone.
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To attack someone.
0
0
To rub on or with a stone in order to polish or sharpen.
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight or struggle against; oppose, resist, or seek to get rid of
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To do, make, or cause to move, go, or act, with unusual or excessive speed or haste; hurry
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To rake with gunfire.
0
0
To stab with a bayonet.
0
0
To hit, injure, or kill with a saber.
0
0
To make a thrusting or poking motion at or into:
0
0
To rush or hurry
0
0
To attack.
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To add pepper to.
0
0
Rake is defined as to gather up, smooth over or move through.
0
0
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To try for, to attempt to reach.
0
0
(Idiomatic, archaic) To attack; to engage in combat with.
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
0
To attack violently using words or force.
0
0
To hit or knock (something), intentionally or accidentally, so that it falls
0
0
To persuade (someone) to engage, esp. for the first time, in illicit or unsanctioned sexual intercourse
0
0
(Baseball) To hit (a ball) with a quick short swing.
0
0
(Football) To kick the ball
0
0
To strike repeatedly.
0
0
To attack:
0
0
To steal (a child)
0
0
To join or combine for a common purpose; form a club.
0
0
To assault; used of an individual
0
0
To assault; used of an individual
0
0
To assault; used of an individual
0
0
To assault; used of an individual
0
0
(American football) to bring a ball carrier to the ground
0
0
To assault; used of an individual
0
0
(Colloquial) To berate; to scold.
0
0
To subject to a heavy attack, physical or figurative.
0
0
To assault; used of an individual
0
0
(Idiomatic) To join together in a group in order to overpower someone else.
0
0
To assault; used of an individual
0
0
(Idiomatic) To exert an unrestrained, aggressive effort, especially by assailing an opponent's or victim's area of greatest vulnerability.
0
0
1857, "The Leary Man", in Anglicus Ducange, The Vulgar Tongue
0
0
(Smithwork) To join by a buttweld.
0
0
To attack (someone) with abusive language.
0
0
To denounce is defined as to take a public stand against something and make clear you don't like or are condemning it.
0
0
To analyze and judge as a critic
0
0
To assail (someone) from an unseen or unexpected direction
0
0
To implement, to employ, to put into use.
0
0
(Intransitive, idiomatic) To begin working.
0
0
To proceed vigorously
0
0
Undertake means to start something or agree to do something.
0
0
(Idiomatic) To confront or deal with directly; to commence a confrontation.
0
0
To proceed vigorously
0
0
(Idiomatic) To put forth the needed effort; to focus; become serious; apply oneself (e.g. to work or study).
0
0
To proceed vigorously
0
0
To proceed vigorously
0
0
To proceed vigorously
0
0
Discontinuance of the use of a drug or other substance, especially one that is addictive.
0
0
(Chess) The move of a piece from a threatened position.
0
0
A plan or system for defending
0
0
To retreat.
0
0
To ward off attacks from; to fight to protect; to guard.
0
0
To repay or requite by an act of the same kind.
0
0
To take action in opposition to; try to eliminate, reduce, or stop:
0
0
Responsibility for a fault or wrong
0
0
A disease.
0
0
Tending to denounce.
0
0
0
0
Characterized by invection or railing.
0
0
Of, pertaining to, causing or accompanied by paroxysms
0
0
The ability or right to approach, enter, exit, communicate with, or make use of:
0
0
(Fencing) A thrust or pass; a lunge.
0
0
A quick, brilliant, and highly successful act; a triumph.
0
0
A sudden action undertaken to surprise an enemy.
0
0
An abusive, bitter, attack, or criticism: denunciation.
0
0
A sudden raid or military advance.
0
0
0
0
The definition of a paroxysm is a sudden attack that happens periodically from a disease or illness.
0
0
(By extension) Any tirade or declamation full of bitter condemnation.
0
0
Polemic is a controversy, debate or dispute, or a person who is inclined to argue.
0
0
The act or practice of forcibly seizing an enemy's goods or citizens in retaliation for a loss or injury inflicted.
0
0
Violent response to an act of harm or perceived injustice.
0
0
A quick witticism; bright retort; quip
0
0
(Military) A concentrated fire from pieces of artillery, as in endeavoring to make a break in a fortification; a volley.
0
0
(Military) An offensive military mission. Used originally to mean an attack from a fortress, but most commonly used today to describe a single mission by a military aircraft.
0
0
A long, vehement speech, esp. one of denunciation; harangue
0
0
Sustained, harshly critical language; invective.
0
0
To judicially or publicly charge one with a criminal offense.
0
0
(Management) To act on a request etc, in order to put it into effect.
0
0
To startle from quiet; to alarm.
0
0
0
0
The definition of assay is to test or survey, especially to determine the quantity of metal that a mixture has or to test a medicine.
0
0
To bash is to hit very hard or to say unkind things about someone or something.
0
0
To engage in or as if in battle.
0
0
To have a first part or element
0
0
To punish or rebuke severely.
0
0
To come into violent conflict
0
0
To strive in opposition or against difficulties; struggle:
0
0
To do away with completely; put an end to:
0
0
To try to overcome; struggle against or contend with
0
0
To become worn away or tattered along the edges.
0
0
(Obs.) To attack physically
0
0
Insult is defined as to speak with rudeness or to say something to offend.
0
0
To make a violent verbal attack; talk or write bitterly (against); rail
0
0
The definition of maim is to mutilate or injure in a way that limits full use of the body.
0
0
To oppose with argument; criticize adversely; call in question
0
0
To encourage someone, or an animal, to attack someone.
0
0
To take part in a skirmish
0
0
To utter a slanderous statement
0
0
(Figuratively) To defeat overwhelmingly.
0
0
To hit or propel (a ball, for example) with a smoothly regulated swing.
0
0
Thrust is defined as to quickly push with force.
0
0
To take pains:
0
0
To carry on, as a contest; to wage.
0
0
A flight arrow
0
0
The process of keeping (something or someone) safe.
0
0
Something that covers or protects; protection, or place affording protection, as from the elements or danger
0
0
Financial or other help.
0
0
Something that sustains something else; essential support:
0
0
The act of resisting, or the capacity to resist.
0
0
The act or result of helping; assistance:
0
0
Anything which protects or defends; defense; shelter; protection.
0
0
A state of well-being or balance, often physical but sometimes also mental and social; the overall level of function of an organism from the cellular (micro) level to the social (macro) level.
0
0
(Law) An agreement whereby parties to a dispute submit the matter to arbitration and agree to be bound by the decision
0
0
(Insurance) The voluntary abandonment of a policy by an insured person in return for a cash payment (surrender value), thus freeing the company of liability
0
0
To swing at a pitch so as to give (a base runner) a better chance of advancing.
0
0
Sustain is defined as to support something or to endure a trial or hardship.
0
0
To allow oneself to be subjected to something:
0
0
To withstand is to be able to successfully cope with something or to be able to resist or remain unaffected by something.
0
0
set to work
0
0
set to work
0
0
To experience; to suffer; to fall upon.
0
0
To set upon with violent force
0
0
To start work on vigorously
0
0
To interrupt someone, or a situation, by doing or saying something abruptly, or forcefully, and usually without thinking about the consequences.
0
0
An attack; an assault:
0
0
The method used in dealing with or accomplishing:
0
0
A path that something or someone moves along.
0
0
A plan of construction; plan of making or doing
0
0
A way of doing or accomplishing something
0
0
The definition of a plan is a document, program or diagram that shows how to proceed.
0
0
The part of a sail, such as the weather clew of a course, to which this rope is fastened.
0
0
(Uncountable) Practical ability in some given field or practice, often as opposed to creativity or imaginative skill. [from 19th c.]
0
0
A period or turn of work, duty, etc.
0
0
0
0
The definition of attack is to make an attempt to hurt someone or something (physically or verbally), to destroy someone or something, to impact someone or something in a dangerous manner, or to forcibly take someone or something.
0
0
Followed by with. General use, said of either fellow employees or instruments or clients.
0
0
Plural form of mean
0
0
To hit heavily and repeatedly with violent blows.
0
0
The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The various types of attacks on computer systems are many and include the following: passive attacks, which, when using sniffers, can take place by eavesdropping and may not be detected; active attacks, which require some interaction such as altering data and can be detected; remote attacks, which do not occur on-site; a hit-and-run ping of death attack, which crashes a computer; a smurf or persistent attack, which affects the target’s machine for a limited amount of time—and then lets it return to normal; a replay attack, which is an active attack whereby the cracker tries to capture message parts and then resend a message sometime later with changes; a brute-force attack, which is a fatiguing attempt to try all combinations until a successful break-in occurs; a man-in-the-middle attack, which involves either eavesdropping on an existing connection or interposing oneself in the middle of a connection and changing data; a hijack attack, which literally hijacks one side of a connection; and rewrite attacks, which change an encrypted message without first decrypting it. Targeted attacks that have the goal of taking over control of a computer system typically contain five distinct phases. In the reconnaissance phase, the attacker tries to find potential candidates for an attack; he or she gathers information about the infrastructure of a network, the people involved in using and managing the network, and the computers attached to it. The second phase includes a scan of the system or a range of systems for vulnerabilities. In the third phase, the vulnerabilities are exploited, either by gaining access to the system or denying service to it. In the fourth phase, the attacker uses a variety of methods to gain access by installing a back door listener, a RootKit, or a Kernel-level RootKit. The last phase of an attack typically involves the attacker’s covering his or her tracks so that the administrator of a computer system would find it difficult to detect that the system has been compromised. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
0
0
The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The various types of attacks on computer systems are many and include the following: passive attacks, which, when using sniffers, can take place by eavesdropping and may not be detected; active attacks, which require some interaction such as altering data and can be detected; remote attacks, which do not occur on-site; a hit-and-run ping of death attack, which crashes a computer; a smurf or persistent attack, which affects the target’s machine for a limited amount of time—and then lets it return to normal; a replay attack, which is an active attack whereby the cracker tries to capture message parts and then resend a message sometime later with changes; a brute-force attack, which is a fatiguing attempt to try all combinations until a successful break-in occurs; a man-in-the-middle attack, which involves either eavesdropping on an existing connection or interposing oneself in the middle of a connection and changing data; a hijack attack, which literally hijacks one side of a connection; and rewrite attacks, which change an encrypted message without first decrypting it. Targeted attacks that have the goal of taking over control of a computer system typically contain five distinct phases. In the reconnaissance phase, the attacker tries to find potential candidates for an attack; he or she gathers information about the infrastructure of a network, the people involved in using and managing the network, and the computers attached to it. The second phase includes a scan of the system or a range of systems for vulnerabilities. In the third phase, the vulnerabilities are exploited, either by gaining access to the system or denying service to it. In the fourth phase, the attacker uses a variety of methods to gain access by installing a back door listener, a RootKit, or a Kernel-level RootKit. The last phase of an attack typically involves the attacker’s covering his or her tracks so that the administrator of a computer system would find it difficult to detect that the system has been compromised. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
0
0
(Computing) One who cracks (i.e. overcomes) computer software or security restrictions.
0
0
(Calculus) A function used to define an integral transform.
0
0
The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The various types of attacks on computer systems are many and include the following: passive attacks, which, when using sniffers, can take place by eavesdropping and may not be detected; active attacks, which require some interaction such as altering data and can be detected; remote attacks, which do not occur on-site; a hit-and-run ping of death attack, which crashes a computer; a smurf or persistent attack, which affects the target’s machine for a limited amount of time—and then lets it return to normal; a replay attack, which is an active attack whereby the cracker tries to capture message parts and then resend a message sometime later with changes; a brute-force attack, which is a fatiguing attempt to try all combinations until a successful break-in occurs; a man-in-the-middle attack, which involves either eavesdropping on an existing connection or interposing oneself in the middle of a connection and changing data; a hijack attack, which literally hijacks one side of a connection; and rewrite attacks, which change an encrypted message without first decrypting it. Targeted attacks that have the goal of taking over control of a computer system typically contain five distinct phases. In the reconnaissance phase, the attacker tries to find potential candidates for an attack; he or she gathers information about the infrastructure of a network, the people involved in using and managing the network, and the computers attached to it. The second phase includes a scan of the system or a range of systems for vulnerabilities. In the third phase, the vulnerabilities are exploited, either by gaining access to the system or denying service to it. In the fourth phase, the attacker uses a variety of methods to gain access by installing a back door listener, a RootKit, or a Kernel-level RootKit. The last phase of an attack typically involves the attacker’s covering his or her tracks so that the administrator of a computer system would find it difficult to detect that the system has been compromised. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
0
0
The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The various types of attacks on computer systems are many and include the following: passive attacks, which, when using sniffers, can take place by eavesdropping and may not be detected; active attacks, which require some interaction such as altering data and can be detected; remote attacks, which do not occur on-site; a hit-and-run ping of death attack, which crashes a computer; a smurf or persistent attack, which affects the target’s machine for a limited amount of time—and then lets it return to normal; a replay attack, which is an active attack whereby the cracker tries to capture message parts and then resend a message sometime later with changes; a brute-force attack, which is a fatiguing attempt to try all combinations until a successful break-in occurs; a man-in-the-middle attack, which involves either eavesdropping on an existing connection or interposing oneself in the middle of a connection and changing data; a hijack attack, which literally hijacks one side of a connection; and rewrite attacks, which change an encrypted message without first decrypting it. Targeted attacks that have the goal of taking over control of a computer system typically contain five distinct phases. In the reconnaissance phase, the attacker tries to find potential candidates for an attack; he or she gathers information about the infrastructure of a network, the people involved in using and managing the network, and the computers attached to it. The second phase includes a scan of the system or a range of systems for vulnerabilities. In the third phase, the vulnerabilities are exploited, either by gaining access to the system or denying service to it. In the fourth phase, the attacker uses a variety of methods to gain access by installing a back door listener, a RootKit, or a Kernel-level RootKit. The last phase of an attack typically involves the attacker’s covering his or her tracks so that the administrator of a computer system would find it difficult to detect that the system has been compromised. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
0
0
The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The various types of attacks on computer systems are many and include the following: passive attacks, which, when using sniffers, can take place by eavesdropping and may not be detected; active attacks, which require some interaction such as altering data and can be detected; remote attacks, which do not occur on-site; a hit-and-run ping of death attack, which crashes a computer; a smurf or persistent attack, which affects the target’s machine for a limited amount of time—and then lets it return to normal; a replay attack, which is an active attack whereby the cracker tries to capture message parts and then resend a message sometime later with changes; a brute-force attack, which is a fatiguing attempt to try all combinations until a successful break-in occurs; a man-in-the-middle attack, which involves either eavesdropping on an existing connection or interposing oneself in the middle of a connection and changing data; a hijack attack, which literally hijacks one side of a connection; and rewrite attacks, which change an encrypted message without first decrypting it. Targeted attacks that have the goal of taking over control of a computer system typically contain five distinct phases. In the reconnaissance phase, the attacker tries to find potential candidates for an attack; he or she gathers information about the infrastructure of a network, the people involved in using and managing the network, and the computers attached to it. The second phase includes a scan of the system or a range of systems for vulnerabilities. In the third phase, the vulnerabilities are exploited, either by gaining access to the system or denying service to it. In the fourth phase, the attacker uses a variety of methods to gain access by installing a back door listener, a RootKit, or a Kernel-level RootKit. The last phase of an attack typically involves the attacker’s covering his or her tracks so that the administrator of a computer system would find it difficult to detect that the system has been compromised. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
0
0
(Computer science, security) An attempt to subvert security by recording legitimate communications and repeating them to try to impersonate a valid user.
0
0
(Computing) A set of software tools used by a third party after gaining access to a computer system in order to conceal the altering of files, or processes being executed by the third party without the user's knowledge.
0
0
(Computing, security) A smurf attack
0
0
The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The term attack can be used in a number of ways, from the more general meaning of an attempt by a cracker to break into a computer to deface a home page or to install a virus on a computer to the more technical information security approach of the term, meaning an attack to a cryptosystem. In the latter usage, a security professional is suggesting that a cracker is searching for weaknesses in the computer system that will allow him or her to decrypt encrypted information in that system. The various types of attacks on computer systems are many and include the following: passive attacks, which, when using sniffers, can take place by eavesdropping and may not be detected; active attacks, which require some interaction such as altering data and can be detected; remote attacks, which do not occur on-site; a hit-and-run ping of death attack, which crashes a computer; a smurf or persistent attack, which affects the target’s machine for a limited amount of time—and then lets it return to normal; a replay attack, which is an active attack whereby the cracker tries to capture message parts and then resend a message sometime later with changes; a brute-force attack, which is a fatiguing attempt to try all combinations until a successful break-in occurs; a man-in-the-middle attack, which involves either eavesdropping on an existing connection or interposing oneself in the middle of a connection and changing data; a hijack attack, which literally hijacks one side of a connection; and rewrite attacks, which change an encrypted message without first decrypting it. Targeted attacks that have the goal of taking over control of a computer system typically contain five distinct phases. In the reconnaissance phase, the attacker tries to find potential candidates for an attack; he or she gathers information about the infrastructure of a network, the people involved in using and managing the network, and the computers attached to it. The second phase includes a scan of the system or a range of systems for vulnerabilities. In the third phase, the vulnerabilities are exploited, either by gaining access to the system or denying service to it. In the fourth phase, the attacker uses a variety of methods to gain access by installing a back door listener, a RootKit, or a Kernel-level RootKit. The last phase of an attack typically involves the attacker’s covering his or her tracks so that the administrator of a computer system would find it difficult to detect that the system has been compromised. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
0
0
a decisive manner of beginning a musical tone or phrase
0
0
ideas or actions intended to deal with a problem or situation
0
0
A rapid, persistent chemical change that releases heat and light and is accompanied by flame, especially the exothermic oxidation of a combustible substance:
0
0
Flak is defined as the bursting shells shot at aircraft from enemy guns on the ground, or criticism or opposition.
0
0
A publicist, a publicity agent
0
0
A violent explosion, as of dynamite or a bomb.
0
0
To become round or plump
0
0
The act of scaling or climbing the walls of a fortified place by ladders
0
1
To make a fierce verbal attack
0
1
To shoot snipe.
0
1
The process whereby some area of land or procedure becomes controlled by the military or administered in a military fashion.
0
1
0
1
A period during which a war is in progress in a particular place.
0
1
(Intransitive, of an intravenous needle) To move from a vein, remaining in the body.
0
2
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
2
Shell means to fire explosives from a large gun or guns.
0
2
To fight offensively; used of an army
0
2
Molest is defined as to harm, or to make unwanted sexual advances, or to sexually assault.
0
2

Synonym Study

  • Bombard means to attack with artillery or bombs, and in figurative use suggests persistent, repetitious action to bombard a speaker with questions
  • Storm suggests a rushing, powerful assault that is stormlike in its action and effect
  • Beset implies an attack or onset from all sides beset with fears
  • Assault implies a sudden, violent attack or onslaught and suggests direct contact and the use of force
  • Assail means to attack by or as if by repeated blows or thrusts assailed by reproaches
  • Attack implies vigorous, aggressive action, whether in actual combat or in an undertaking to attack a city, to attack a problem
Find another word for attack. In this page you can discover 289 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for attack, like: assault, lunge, onslaught, strike, open-fire, onrush, aggression, coup de main (French), charge, drive and offensive.