Intrusion synonyms

ĭn-tro͝o'zhən
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An encroachment beyond proper limits
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An entering or being entered by an attacking military force
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The act of impinging.
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(Sports) The illegal obstruction of an opponent in some ball games.
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An encroachment, as of a right or privilege:
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(Law) Abbreviation of enterprise.
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An interrupting or being interrupted
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The act or process of intervening:
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Action of the verb meddle.
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The act or an instance of encroaching.
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An aggressive entrance into foreign territory; a raid or invasion.
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An advance into enemy territory, an incursion, an attempted invasion
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The definition of an infraction is a violation of the law that is less serious than a misdemeanor, or is a violation of rules you are supposed to follow.
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The forcing of oneself, one's presence or will, etc. on another or others without right or invitation
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The act or an instance of transgressing; breach of a law, duty, etc.
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Sin [1290]
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The act of inflicting or something inflicted; an imposition
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The act or an instance of interfering or intruding
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(Usually plural) Something that a person likes (prefers).
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(Rare or obsolete) The execution of a will.
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An item formed by the process of extrusion.
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A formal record or log of the financial transactions of an organization or system, especially such a computerized record
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To compromise a computer system by breaking the security of such a system or causing it to enter into an insecure state. The act of intruding—or gaining unauthorized access to a system—typically leaves traces that can be discovered by intrusion detection systems. One of the goals of intruders is to remain undetected for as long as possible so that they can continue with their malicious activity ­undisturbed. To compromise a computer system by breaking the security of such a system or causing it to enter into an insecure state. The act of intruding—or gaining unauthorized access to a system—typically leaves traces that can be discovered by intrusion detection systems. One of the goals of intruders is to remain undetected for as long as possible so that they can continue with their malicious activity ­undisturbed. Security professionals need to take steps when a system breach is suspected. First, suspicious accounts should be disabled immediately. Then, the suspicious accounts need to be reviewed to assess who set up the account and for what reasons. Because audit logs will indicate who created the account, finding the time and date on which the account was created will be very useful information. If the account is the outcome of a crack attack, the system reviewer will have a particular time frame in which to determine whether other audit log events are “of interest.” If the reviewer wants to determine whether a suspicious application is indeed being used by a cracker to listen for incoming connections—a potential “back door” into the system—the reviewer is well advised to consider using a tool such as TCPView. The TCPView tool will tell the system reviewer what applications are using open system ports. Because crackers can put Trojan horses in place of the netstat and Isof programs, the reviewer should scan the attacked system from a different computer. This feat can be accomplished by using a service such as the free insecure.org nmap port scanner. Malware can also be triggered from the operating system’s job scheduler. A system reviewer can see what jobs—legitimate or otherwise—are scheduled to be executed in the system by typing AT at the command prompt. Haberstetzer, V. Thwarting Hacker Techniques: Signs of a Compromised System. [Online, March 21, 2005.] TechTarget Website. http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/tip/ 0,289483,sid14_gci1069097,00.html?track=NL-35.
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Present participle of crack.
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Exploit is defined as to use someone or something to achieve one's own purposes.
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A book in which a log is kept, specif. a log of a ship's voyage or an aircraft's flight; logbook
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Software that is written and distributed for malicious purposes, such as impairing or destroying computer systems. Computer viruses are malware.
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To compromise a computer system by breaking the security of such a system or causing it to enter into an insecure state. The act of intruding—or gaining unauthorized access to a system—typically leaves traces that can be discovered by intrusion detection systems. One of the goals of intruders is to remain undetected for as long as possible so that they can continue with their malicious activity ­undisturbed. To compromise a computer system by breaking the security of such a system or causing it to enter into an insecure state. The act of intruding—or gaining unauthorized access to a system—typically leaves traces that can be discovered by intrusion detection systems. One of the goals of intruders is to remain undetected for as long as possible so that they can continue with their malicious activity ­undisturbed. Security professionals need to take steps when a system breach is suspected. First, suspicious accounts should be disabled immediately. Then, the suspicious accounts need to be reviewed to assess who set up the account and for what reasons. Because audit logs will indicate who created the account, finding the time and date on which the account was created will be very useful information. If the account is the outcome of a crack attack, the system reviewer will have a particular time frame in which to determine whether other audit log events are “of interest.” If the reviewer wants to determine whether a suspicious application is indeed being used by a cracker to listen for incoming connections—a potential “back door” into the system—the reviewer is well advised to consider using a tool such as TCPView. The TCPView tool will tell the system reviewer what applications are using open system ports. Because crackers can put Trojan horses in place of the netstat and Isof programs, the reviewer should scan the attacked system from a different computer. This feat can be accomplished by using a service such as the free insecure.org nmap port scanner. Malware can also be triggered from the operating system’s job scheduler. A system reviewer can see what jobs—legitimate or otherwise—are scheduled to be executed in the system by typing AT at the command prompt. Haberstetzer, V. Thwarting Hacker Techniques: Signs of a Compromised System. [Online, March 21, 2005.] TechTarget Website. http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/tip/ 0,289483,sid14_gci1069097,00.html?track=NL-35.
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The act of breaching the law; contravening a duty or right.
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The act of usurping, especially the wrongful seizure of royal sovereignty.
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Find another word for intrusion. In this page you can discover 39 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for intrusion, like: forced entrance, obtrusion, invasion, impingement, interference, infringement, enter, interruption, intervention, interposition and meddling.