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Storm synonyms

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Furious agitation, commotion, or tumult; an uproar:
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  1. Furious agitation, commotion, or tumult; an uproar:
  2. A violent storm with high winds, esp. one accompanied by rain, hail, or snow
  3. A violent windstorm, frequently accompanied by rain, snow, or hail.
A heavy rain
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  1. A heavy rain
  2. A heavy rain
  3. A heavy fall of rain.
A sudden, very heavy rain
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  1. A sudden, very heavy rain
The condition of being disturbed:
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  1. The condition of being disturbed:
  2. A disturbing or being disturbed
  3. A variation in normal wind conditions.
An overwhelming number or amount; deluge
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  1. An overwhelming number or amount; deluge
  2. A violent snowstorm with winds blowing at a minimum speed of 56 km (35 mi) per hour and visibility of less 400 m (0.25 mi) for three hours.
  3. A severe snowstorm characterized by cold temperatures and heavy drifting of snow
(Sports, aerial freestyle skiing) "full—triple-full—full" – an acrobatic maneuver consisting of three flips and five twists, with one twist on the first flip, three twists on the second flip, one twist on the third flip
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  1. (Sports, aerial freestyle skiing) "full—triple-full—full" – an acrobatic maneuver consisting of three flips and five twists, with one twist on the first flip, three twists on the second flip, one twist on the third flip
  2. A British fighter aircraft used during World War II, especially during the Battle of Britain
  3. A severe, rotating tropical storm with heavy rains and cyclonic winds exceeding 74 mi (119 km) per hour, especially such a storm occurring in the Northern Hemisphere. Hurricanes originate in the tropical parts of the Atlantic Ocean or the Caribbean Sea and move generally northward. They lose force when they move over land or colder ocean waters.
A whirling, funnel-shaped or cylindrical column of air full of spray, occurring over a body of water
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  1. A whirling, funnel-shaped or cylindrical column of air full of spray, occurring over a body of water
A storm marked by heavy snowfall.
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  1. A storm marked by heavy snowfall.
  2. Bad weather involving blowing winds and snow, or blowing winds and heavy snowfall amount.
A fine blizzard of snow in Russia.
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  1. A fine blizzard of snow in Russia.
A sudden storm, as found in a squall line. Often a nautical usage.
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  1. A sudden storm, as found in a squall line. Often a nautical usage.
  2. A brief, violent windstorm, usually with rain or snow
  3. A brief, sudden, violent windstorm, often accompanied by rain or snow. A squall is said to occur if a wind having a sustained speed of 40 km (25 mi) per hour lasts at least 1 minute and then decreases rapidly.
A Southeastern and Indian Ocean weather phenomenon that results in wind speeds of around 150 to 200 km/h.
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  1. A Southeastern and Indian Ocean weather phenomenon that results in wind speeds of around 150 to 200 km/h.
  2. (Loosely) A windstorm with a violent, whirling movement; tornado or hurricane
  3. A large-scale system of winds that spiral in toward a region of low atmospheric pressure. A cyclone's rotational direction is opposite to that of an anticyclone. In the Northern hemisphere, a cyclone rotates counterclockwise; in the Southern hemisphere, clockwise. Because low-pressure systems generally produce clouds and precipitation, cyclones are often simply referred to as storms. &diamf3; An extratropical cyclone is one that forms outside the tropics at middle or high latitudes. Extratropical cyclones usually have an organized front and migrate eastward with the prevailing westerly winds of those latitudes. &diamf3; A tropical cyclone forms over warm tropical waters and is generally smaller than an extratropical cyclone. Such a system is characterized by a warm, well-defined core and can range in intensity from a tropical depression to a hurricane.
A violently rotating column of air extending from a cumulonimbus cloud to the Earth, ranging in width from a few meters to more than a kilometer and whirling at speeds between 64 km (40 mi) and 509 km (316 mi) per hour or higher with comparable updrafts in the center of the vortex. The vortex may contain several smaller vortices rotating within it. Tornadoes typically take the form of a twisting, funnel-shaped cloud extending downward from storm clouds, often reaching the ground, and dissolving into thin, ropelike clouds as the tornado dissipates. Tornadoes may travel from a few dozen meters to hundreds of kilometers along the ground. Tornadoes usually form in the tail end of violent thunderstorms, with weaker funnels sometimes forming in groups along a leading squall line of an advancing cold front or in areas near a hurricane . The strongest tornadoes, which may last several hours and travel hundreds of kilometers, can cause massive destruction in a relatively narrow strip along their path. The causes of tornado formation are not well understood.
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  1. A violently rotating column of air extending from a cumulonimbus cloud to the Earth, ranging in width from a few meters to more than a kilometer and whirling at speeds between 64 km (40 mi) and 509 km (316 mi) per hour or higher with comparable updrafts in the center of the vortex. The vortex may contain several smaller vortices rotating within it. Tornadoes typically take the form of a twisting, funnel-shaped cloud extending downward from storm clouds, often reaching the ground, and dissolving into thin, ropelike clouds as the tornado dissipates. Tornadoes may travel from a few dozen meters to hundreds of kilometers along the ground. Tornadoes usually form in the tail end of violent thunderstorms, with weaker funnels sometimes forming in groups along a leading squall line of an advancing cold front or in areas near a hurricane . The strongest tornadoes, which may last several hours and travel hundreds of kilometers, can cause massive destruction in a relatively narrow strip along their path. The causes of tornado formation are not well understood.
  2. A violently whirling column of air, with wind speeds of about 100 to 300 miles per hour, extending downward from a cumulonimbus cloud, esp. in Australia and the central U.S.: usually appearing as a rapidly rotating, slender, funnel-shaped cloud and typically causing great destruction along its narrow path
  3. A violently rotating column of air extending from a cumulonimbus cloud to the ground, ranging in width from a few meters to more than a kilometer, with destructive winds up to 510 kilometers (316 miles) per hour or higher. Tornadoes are typically associated with a funnel cloud pendant from a storm's wall cloud, often extending to the bottom of the tornado.
One that twists, as in the manufacture of rope or yarn.
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  1. One that twists, as in the manufacture of rope or yarn.
  2. A thrown or batted ball that has been given a twist
  3. (Sports) A ball thrown or batted with a twist.
A sudden burst, as of rain or smoke.
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  1. A sudden burst, as of rain or smoke.
  2. A sudden, strong rush of air or wind
  3. A sudden burst of rain, smoke, fire, sound, etc.
A gust of wind; strong rush of air
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  1. A gust of wind; strong rush of air
  2. A violent verbal assault or outburst:
  3. A powerful hit, blow, or shot.
A forceful outburst:
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  1. A forceful outburst:
  2. (Archaic) A periodic payment, such as is made of a rent or annuity.
  3. A strong wind
An unexpected shock or calamity.
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  1. An unexpected shock or calamity.
  2. The state of blossoming:
  3. A mass of blossoms:
Any wind that reverses its direction seasonally or blows constantly between land and adjacent water
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  1. Any wind that reverses its direction seasonally or blows constantly between land and adjacent water
  2. The rain that comes with any of these winds or wind systems.
  3. The season during which this wind blows from the southwest, characterized by heavy rains
(Obs.) Pain or trouble
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  1. (Obs.) Pain or trouble
  2. A strong feeling of displeasure or hostility.
  3. A feeling of displeasure resulting from injury, mistreatment, opposition, etc., and usually showing itself in a desire to fight back at the supposed cause of this feeling
Discussion meant to stir up people and produce changes
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  1. Discussion meant to stir up people and produce changes
  2. Emotional disturbance or excitement
  3. The stirring up of public interest in a matter of controversy, such as a political or social issue.
The act of annoying or the state of being annoyed.
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  1. The act of annoying or the state of being annoyed.
  2. A thing or person that annoys
  3. A cause of irritation or vexation; a nuisance.
Violent motion; turbulence
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  1. Violent motion; turbulence
  2. A condition of turbulent motion.
  3. A noisy rushing about; confusion; bustle
A state of extreme confusion or agitation; commotion or tumult:
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  1. A state of extreme confusion or agitation; commotion or tumult:
  2. Harassing labour; trouble; disturbance.
  3. Tumult; commotion; uproar; confusion
Behavior or treatment in which physical force is exerted for the purpose of causing damage or injury:
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  1. Behavior or treatment in which physical force is exerted for the purpose of causing damage or injury:
  2. The use of physical force, especially physical force utilized with malice and/or the attempt to harm someone. Some courts have ruled that in labor disputes, violence includes picketing with false information on the placards, in an attempt to harm a business. The use of physical force, especially physical force utilized with malice and/or the attempt to harm someone. Some courts have ruled that in labor disputes, violence includes picketing with false information on the placards, in an attempt to harm a business.
  3. Extreme or powerful emotion or expression:
(Countable, astronomy, physics) Variation in an orbit due to the influence of external bodies
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  1. (Countable, astronomy, physics) Variation in an orbit due to the influence of external bodies
  2. A small change in a physical system, such as a variation in a planet's orbit resulting from the gravitational influence of other celestial bodies.
  3. Variation in a designated orbit, as of a planet, that results from the influence of one or more external bodies. Gravitational attraction between planets can cause perturbations and cause a planet to deviate from its expected orbit. Perturbations in Neptune's orbit led to the discovery of the object—Pluto—that was causing the perturbation. Perturbations in the orbits of stars have led to the discovery of planetary systems outside of our Solar system.
(Archaic) A period of lively, exciting social life or revelry
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  1. (Archaic) A period of lively, exciting social life or revelry
  2. A broad wooden shoe or patten for a man or horse, to allow walking on marshy or soft ground.
  3. A noisy confusion; loud and confused talk or activity; uproar
A characteristic general quality; tone:
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  1. A characteristic general quality; tone:
  2. A state of mind or emotion; disposition:
  3. A tendency to become easily angry or irritable:
A confused sound of many voices; uproar; tumult
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  1. A confused sound of many voices; uproar; tumult
  2. A loud confusing noise:
  3. A confused uproar, commotion, tumult or racket.
Strong emotion, enthusiasm, or desire
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  1. Strong emotion, enthusiasm, or desire
  2. A furious, uncontrolled anger; esp., a brief spell of raving fury
  3. Violent, explosive anger.
Violence; vehemence; fierceness
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  1. Violence; vehemence; fierceness
  2. Violent anger; wild rage
  3. Violent anger; rage.
An artistic work, as an oratorio or a play, based on these narratives
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  1. An artistic work, as an oratorio or a play, based on these narratives
  2. Strong love or affection
  3. Extreme, compelling emotion; intense emotional drive or excitement
A group of psychiatric symptoms, including heightened emotionality, attention-seeking behavior, and preoccupation with physical symptoms that may not be explainable by a medical condition. The term hysteria is no longer in clinical use, and such symptoms are currently attributed to any of several psychiatric conditions, including somatic symptom disorder, conversion disorder, and histrionic personality disorder.
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  1. A group of psychiatric symptoms, including heightened emotionality, attention-seeking behavior, and preoccupation with physical symptoms that may not be explainable by a medical condition. The term hysteria is no longer in clinical use, and such symptoms are currently attributed to any of several psychiatric conditions, including somatic symptom disorder, conversion disorder, and histrionic personality disorder.
  2. Any outbreak of wild, uncontrolled excitement or feeling, such as fits of laughing and crying
  3. Behavior exhibiting excessive or uncontrollable emotion, such as fear or panic.
To utter a similar cry of pain, anger, grief, etc.
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  1. To utter a similar cry of pain, anger, grief, etc.
  2. To drive or effect by howling
  3. To shout or laugh in scorn, mirth, etc.
To move while making a loud noise:
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  1. To move while making a loud noise:
  2. To breathe with a rasping sound. Used of a horse.
  3. To utter in or express with a loud, deep sound
To take root, become established.
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  1. To take root, become established.
To blow strongly for a brief period.
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  1. To blow strongly for a brief period.
  2. To storm briefly; blow a squall
  3. A brief, sudden, violent windstorm, often accompanied by rain or snow. A squall is said to occur if a wind having a sustained speed of 40 km (25 mi) per hour lasts at least 1 minute and then decreases rapidly.
To pour a liquid or particles into (a container):
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  1. To pour a liquid or particles into (a container):
  2. To empty (a container) of a liquid or granular solid:
  3. To rain heavily
To let fall in fine drops or particles:
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  1. To let fall in fine drops or particles:
  2. To rain gently in fine, mistlike drops.
  3. (Cooking) To drip or pour (a liquid) in a fine stream onto (a food)
To move or descend from one height or level to another:
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  1. To move or descend from one height or level to another:
  2. To move down with a current of water or air
  3. To fall in drops:
Water that condenses from water vapor in the atmosphere and falls to Earth as separate drops from clouds. Rain forms primarily in three ways: at weather fronts, when the water vapor in the warmer mass of air cools and condenses; along mountain ranges, when a warm mass of air is forced to rise over a mountain and its water vapor cools and condenses; and by convection in hot climates, when the water vapor in suddenly rising masses of warm air cools and condenses.
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  1. Water that condenses from water vapor in the atmosphere and falls to Earth as separate drops from clouds. Rain forms primarily in three ways: at weather fronts, when the water vapor in the warmer mass of air cools and condenses; along mountain ranges, when a warm mass of air is forced to rise over a mountain and its water vapor cools and condenses; and by convection in hot climates, when the water vapor in suddenly rising masses of warm air cools and condenses.
  2. To send or pour down.
  3. To release rain.
To make a sudden departure.
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  1. To make a sudden departure.
  2. To rain in fine, mistlike droplets; drizzle.
To express contempt or animosity, especially by ejecting matter from the mouth.
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  1. To express contempt or animosity, especially by ejecting matter from the mouth.
  2. To rain or snow in light, scattered drops or flakes.
  3. To rain or snow lightly or briefly
To make a quick succession of light soft tapping sounds:
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  1. To make a quick succession of light soft tapping sounds:
  2. To speak or mumble rapidly or glibly; recite (prayers, etc.) mechanically or thoughtlessly
  3. To move with quick, light, softly audible steps.
To set upon with violent force.
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  1. To set upon with violent force.
  2. To use force against in order to harm; start a fight with; strike out at with physical or military force; assault
  3. To start work on with purpose and vigor:
To attack vigorously or move forward as if attacking
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  1. To attack vigorously or move forward as if attacking
  2. To bear down on or set upon with force; attack vigorously
  3. To excite; rouse:
To attack swiftly and suddenly:
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  1. To attack swiftly and suddenly:
  2. (Football) To advance the ball or attempt to advance the ball from scrimmage by carrying it rather than passing.
  3. To overcome or capture by such an attack or assault
To attack with arguments, questions, doubts, etc.
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  1. To attack with arguments, questions, doubts, etc.
  2. To attack violently, as with blows or military force; assault.
  3. To attack verbally, as with ridicule or censure.
An artificial obstruction, such as a dam or irrigation channel, built in a watercourse to increase its depth or to divert its flow.
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  1. An artificial obstruction, such as a dam or irrigation channel, built in a watercourse to increase its depth or to divert its flow.
  2. A heavy, prolonged attack of words, blows, etc.
  3. A curtain of artillery fire laid down to keep enemy forces from moving, or to cover or prepare the way for one's own forces, esp. in attack
An abrupt, intense increase; a rush:
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  1. An abrupt, intense increase; a rush:
  2. A volley of bullets fired from an automatic weapon:
  3. The result of bursting, especially the explosion of a projectile or bomb on impact or in the air.
A continuous firing of artillery
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  1. A continuous firing of artillery
  2. A harsh verbal or physical attack.
  3. An extended, usually heavy discharge of artillery.
A simultaneous or rapid and continuous discharge of many firearms
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  1. A simultaneous or rapid and continuous discharge of many firearms
  2. A discharge from a number of firearms, fired simultaneously or in rapid succession.
  3. Something like this; barrage
A falling, showering, etc. of hail, or in the manner of hail
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  1. A falling, showering, etc. of hail, or in the manner of hail
  2. Precipitation in the form of rounded pellets of ice and hard snow that usually falls during thunderstorms. Hail forms when raindrops are blown up and down within a cloud, passing repeatedly through layers of warm and freezing air and collecting layers of ice until they are too heavy for the winds to keep them from falling.
  3. Something that falls with the force and quantity of a shower of ice and hard snow:
The simultaneous release of a rack of bombs from an aircraft.
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  1. The simultaneous release of a rack of bombs from an aircraft.
  2. A burst of cheers or applause
  3. A discharge of a number of pieces of artillery or small arms, in regular succession or at the same time, either as a salute or, esp. in naval battles, as a broadside
A party held to honor and present gifts to someone:
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  1. A party held to honor and present gifts to someone:
  2. A fall of a group of objects, especially from the sky:
  3. An abundant flow; an outpouring:
A stroke, kick, or other strike of the ball made before the ball touches the ground.
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  1. A stroke, kick, or other strike of the ball made before the ball touches the ground.
  2. (Sports) The act of returning the ball, shuttlecock, etc. in certain games before it touches the ground
  3. (Sports) An exchange of strokes in a court game, such as volleyball, ending when one side fails to make a good return and resulting in a point or the loss of service.
To initiate an attack, war, quarrel, or fight.
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  1. To initiate an attack, war, quarrel, or fight.
  2. To start a quarrel or be the first to attack
To attack with arguments, questions, doubts, etc.
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  1. To attack with arguments, questions, doubts, etc.
  2. To attack violently, as with blows or military force; assault.
  3. To attack verbally, as with ridicule or censure.
To make a violent assault upon; attack.
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  1. To make a violent assault upon; attack.
  2. In criminal and tort law, an act, usually consisting of a threat or attempt to inflict bodily injury upon another person, coupled with the apparent present ability to succeed in carrying out the threat or the attempt if not prevented, that causes the person to have a reasonable fear or apprehension of immediate harmful or offensive contact. No intent to cause battery or the fear or apprehension is required so long as the victim is placed in reasonable apprehension or fear. No actual physical injury is needed to establish an assault, but if there is any physical contact, the act constitutes both an assault and a battery.
  3. To attack verbally; criticize or denounce.
To set upon with violent force.
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  1. To set upon with violent force.
  2. To use force against in order to harm; start a fight with; strike out at with physical or military force; assault
  3. To start work on with purpose and vigor:
To trouble persistently; harass.
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  1. To trouble persistently; harass.
  2. To cover or set thickly with; stud
  3. To attack from all sides; harass or besiege
To experience; to suffer; to fall upon.
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To affect keenly or forcibly; impress:
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  1. To affect keenly or forcibly; impress:
  2. To begin a military attack:
  3. To attack
Find another word for storm. In this page you can discover 84 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for storm, like: tempest, downpour, cloudburst, disturbance, blizzard, hurricane, wind, waterspout, snowstorm, purga and squall.