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Pour synonyms

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To relieve (a ship, for example) of a burden or of contents; unload.
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  1. To relieve (a ship, for example) of a burden or of contents; unload.
  2. To shoot:
  3. (Electricity) To cause the release of stored energy or electric charge from (a battery, for example).
To issue (paper money or the like); put into circulation
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  1. To issue (paper money or the like); put into circulation
  2. To give or send out (matter or energy):
  3. To issue with authority, especially to put (currency) into circulation.
To flow, go, or come out:
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  1. To flow, go, or come out:
  2. To proceed from a source; emerge or come forth:
  3. To be derived or result (from a cause)
(Informal) To let (something secret) become known; divulge
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  1. (Informal) To let (something secret) become known; divulge
  2. To allow or cause, esp. unintentionally or accidentally, to run, fall, or flow over from a container, usually so as to result in loss or waste
  3. (Informal) To disclose (something previously unknown); divulge:
To fall, strike, or scatter with a splash or splashes
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  1. To fall, strike, or scatter with a splash or splashes
  2. To move with splashes
  3. To apply patches or spots of a contrasting, usually bright, color to:
To cause to stream
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  1. To cause to stream
  2. A flow of water in a channel or bed, as a brook, rivulet, or small river.
  3. To flow in or as in a stream
A temporary rise of the water level, as in a river or lake or along a seacoast, resulting in its spilling over and out of its natural or artificial confines onto land that is normally dry. Floods are usually caused by excessive runoff from precipitation or snowmelt, or by coastal storm surges or other tidal phenomena. &diamf3; Floods are sometimes described according to their statistical occurrence. A fifty-year flood is a flood having a magnitude that is reached in a particular location on average once every fifty years. In any given year there is a two percent statistical chance of the occurrence of a fifty-year flood and a one percent chance of a hundred-year flood .
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  1. A temporary rise of the water level, as in a river or lake or along a seacoast, resulting in its spilling over and out of its natural or artificial confines onto land that is normally dry. Floods are usually caused by excessive runoff from precipitation or snowmelt, or by coastal storm surges or other tidal phenomena. &diamf3; Floods are sometimes described according to their statistical occurrence. A fifty-year flood is a flood having a magnitude that is reached in a particular location on average once every fifty years. In any given year there is a two percent statistical chance of the occurrence of a fifty-year flood and a one percent chance of a hundred-year flood .
  2. To rise, flow, or gush out in or as in a flood
  3. To pour forth; overflow:
To provide with something in great abundance; surfeit:
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  1. To provide with something in great abundance; surfeit:
  2. To wet through and through; soak.
  3. To administer a large oral dose of liquid medicine to an animal.
To pour (a liquid) from one container into another.
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  1. To pour (a liquid) from one container into another.
  2. To pour off (wine, for example) without disturbing the sediment.
To attract audiences
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  1. To attract audiences
  2. To bring about deliberately; provoke:
  3. To compose or write out in legal format:
To spread out; diffuse; radiate
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  1. To spread out; diffuse; radiate
  2. To radiate; diffuse.
  3. To spread or flow out.
(Geol.) To change in shape under pressure without breaking or splitting, as ice in a glacier or rocks deep in the earth
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  1. (Geol.) To change in shape under pressure without breaking or splitting, as ice in a glacier or rocks deep in the earth
  2. To undergo plastic deformation without cracking or breaking. Used of rocks, metals, or minerals.
  3. To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity, as in the manner characteristic of a fluid.
To flow forth suddenly in great volume:
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  1. To flow forth suddenly in great volume:
  2. To express oneself with exaggerated enthusiasm or feeling; talk or write effusively
  3. To cause to flow out suddenly and plentifully
(Nautical) To cause to move on a course:
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  1. (Nautical) To cause to move on a course:
  2. To migrate, especially to move in a shoal in order to spawn. Used of fish.
  3. To cause to function; operate:
(Football) To run toward (a passer or kicker) in order to block or disrupt a play.
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  1. (Football) To run toward (a passer or kicker) in order to block or disrupt a play.
  2. To cause to act with haste:
  3. To do, make, or cause to move, go, or act, with unusual or excessive speed or haste; hurry
To give forth a continuous stream of light rays or beams; shine.
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  1. To give forth a continuous stream of light rays or beams; shine.
  2. To emit, discharge, or exude (a body fluid, for example).
  3. (Computers) To transmit (audio or video content), especially over the Internet, in small, sequential packets that permit the content to be played continuously as it is being received and without saving it to a hard disk.
(Nautical) To slip around a windlass. Used of a rope.
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  1. (Nautical) To slip around a windlass. Used of a rope.
  2. To move like advancing waves:
  3. To improve one's performance suddenly, especially in bettering one's standing in a competition.
In a pleasing or desirable manner; satisfactorily
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  1. In a pleasing or desirable manner; satisfactorily
  2. With good reason; in justice; properly
  3. To flow or spring from or as from a well; gush (up, forth, down, out, etc.)
To pour forth; overflow:
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  1. To pour forth; overflow:
  2. To become inundated or submerged:
  3. A temporary rise of the water level, as in a river or lake or along a seacoast, resulting in its spilling over and out of its natural or artificial confines onto land that is normally dry. Floods are usually caused by excessive runoff from precipitation or snowmelt, or by coastal storm surges or other tidal phenomena. &diamf3; Floods are sometimes described according to their statistical occurrence. A fifty-year flood is a flood having a magnitude that is reached in a particular location on average once every fifty years. In any given year there is a two percent statistical chance of the occurrence of a fifty-year flood and a one percent chance of a hundred-year flood .
To act as a swarm in surrounding, attacking, dealing with, etc.
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  1. To act as a swarm in surrounding, attacking, dealing with, etc.
  2. To move, collect, be present, etc. in large numbers; throng; abound
  3. To gather and fly off in a swarm
To crowd or press upon in large numbers
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  1. To crowd or press upon in large numbers
  2. To gather, press, or move in a throng.
  3. To gather together, move, or press in a throng
To gather or go together in a throng
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  1. To gather or go together in a throng
  2. To walk, go, or pass at a slow, deliberate pace
  3. To move or go as a group or in large numbers:
Find another word for pour. In this page you can discover 34 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for pour, like: discharge, emit, issue, replenish with, spill, splash, stream, flood, drench, drain and flow.