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Flood synonyms

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The act of overflowing.
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  1. The act of overflowing.
  2. An outlet or vent through which excess liquid may escape.
  3. (Computers) A condition in which a calculation produces a unit of data too large to be stored in the location allotted to it.
A heavy rainfall
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  1. A heavy rainfall
  2. Something that overwhelms as if by a great flood:
  3. In the Bible, the great flood that occurred in the time of Noah.
A sudden, rapid flood, usually of short duration and local impact
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  1. A sudden, rapid flood, usually of short duration and local impact
  2. A sudden, violent flood, as after a heavy rain
  3. A sudden, localized flood of great volume and short duration, typically caused by unusually heavy rain in a semiarid area. Flash floods can reach their peak volume in a matter of a few minutes and often carry large loads of mud and rock fragments.
(Egyptology) One of the three seasons of Ancient Egypt.
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  1. (Egyptology) One of the three seasons of Ancient Egypt.
The forward and backward motion of a ship subjected to wave action.
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  1. The forward and backward motion of a ship subjected to wave action.
  2. Such waves or billows collectively or in a series
  3. A coastal rise in water level caused by wind.
The regular rise and fall in the surface level of the Earth's oceans, seas, and bays caused by the gravitational attraction of the Moon and to a lesser extent of the Sun. The maximum high tides (or spring tides) occur when the Moon and Sun are directly aligned with Earth, so that their gravitational pull on Earth's waters is along the same line and is reinforced. The lowest high tides (or neap tides) occur when the Moon and Sun are at right angles to each other, so that their gravitational pull on Earth's waters originates from two different directions and is mitigated. Tides vary greatly by region and are influenced by sea-floor topography, storms, and water currents.
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  1. The regular rise and fall in the surface level of the Earth's oceans, seas, and bays caused by the gravitational attraction of the Moon and to a lesser extent of the Sun. The maximum high tides (or spring tides) occur when the Moon and Sun are directly aligned with Earth, so that their gravitational pull on Earth's waters is along the same line and is reinforced. The lowest high tides (or neap tides) occur when the Moon and Sun are at right angles to each other, so that their gravitational pull on Earth's waters originates from two different directions and is mitigated. Tides vary greatly by region and are influenced by sea-floor topography, storms, and water currents.
  2. The periodic variation in the surface level of the oceans and of bays, gulfs, inlets, and estuaries, caused by gravitational attraction of the moon and sun.
  3. Flood tide.
A point of culmination; a climax.
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  1. A point of culmination; a climax.
  2. The tide at its fullest, when the water reaches its highest level.
  3. The tide when it is at its highest level at a particular time and place. The highest tides reached under normal meteorological conditions (the spring tides ) take place when the Moon and Sun are directly aligned with respect to Earth. High tides are less extreme (the neap tides ) when the Moon and Sun are at right angles. Storms and other meteorological conditions can greatly affect the height of the tides as well.
A stream of fresh water that empties into a body of salt water.
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  1. A stream of fresh water that empties into a body of salt water.
  2. A sudden overflow of a stream resulting from a heavy rain or a thaw.
  3. (Poetic) A small stream, especially one flowing into the sea.
A swift, violent stream, esp. of water
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  1. A swift, violent stream, esp. of water
  2. A very heavy fall of rain
  3. A flood or rush of words, mail, etc.
(Law) The increase in the area of land due to the deposition of sediment (alluvium) by a river.
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  1. (Law) The increase in the area of land due to the deposition of sediment (alluvium) by a river.
  2. (Law) The increasing of land area along a shore by deposited alluvium or by the recession of water.
  3. The creation of land caused by the gradual depositing, either by artificial or natural forces, of earth, sand, gravel, and similar materials along the shoreline of a river or ocean by running water. The new land becomes the property of the owner of the property to which it is attached, provided the accumulation is so gradual that it cannot be visibly perceived from moment to moment. See also accretion, reliction, alluvium, and avulsion. The creation of land caused by the gradual depositing, either by artificial or natural forces, of earth, sand, gravel, and similar materials along the shoreline of a river or ocean by running water. The new land becomes the property of the owner of the property to which it is attached, provided the accumulation is so gradual that it cannot be visibly perceived from moment to moment. See also accretion, reliction, alluvium, and avulsion.
An undulation or series of undulations in or on a surface, such as that caused by wind over a field of grain
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  1. An undulation or series of undulations in or on a surface, such as that caused by wind over a field of grain
  2. An upsurge or rise, as to a crest, or a progressively swelling manifestation
  3. A surge or rush, as of sensation:
A sudden and rapid flow of tide in certain rivers and estuaries which rolls up as a wave; an eagre.
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  1. A sudden and rapid flow of tide in certain rivers and estuaries which rolls up as a wave; an eagre.
  2. In fluid mechanics, a jump in the level of moving water, generally propagating in the opposite direction to the current. Strong ocean tides can cause bores to propagate up rivers.
  3. A tidal wave caused by the surge of a flood tide upstream in a narrowing estuary or by colliding tidal currents.
The incoming or rising tide, occurring between the time when the tide is lowest and the time when the following tide is highest.
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  1. The incoming or rising tide, occurring between the time when the tide is lowest and the time when the following tide is highest.
  2. The period between low tide and high tide, during which water flows toward the shore.
  3. The incoming or rising tide
(Brit.) A high tidal wave in an estuary; bore
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  1. (Brit.) A high tidal wave in an estuary; bore
  2. A tidal bore
The act, action, or result of pouring out or producing:
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  1. The act, action, or result of pouring out or producing:
  2. The sudden flowing of a large amount of something.
  3. A release or display of strong feeling
(Chiefly British) A flash flood.
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  1. (Chiefly British) A flash flood.
  2. A sudden heavy fall of rain.
  3. A great number or quantity
(--- Chemistry) The amount of an isotope of an element that exists in nature, usually expressed as a percentage of the total amount of all isotopes of the element.
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  1. (--- Chemistry) The amount of an isotope of an element that exists in nature, usually expressed as a percentage of the total amount of all isotopes of the element.
  2. Affluence; prosperity:
  3. The condition of being in rich supply:
An extreme abundance; abundance to a vast degree that seems almost excessive.
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  1. An extreme abundance; abundance to a vast degree that seems almost excessive.
To overwhelm as if with a flood; swamp:
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  1. To overwhelm as if with a flood; swamp:
  2. To cover or engulf with a flood; deluge
  3. To cover with water, especially floodwaters.
To become swamped; sink in or as in a swamp
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  1. To become swamped; sink in or as in a swamp
  2. To become full of water or sink.
  3. An area of low-lying wet or seasonally flooded land, often having trees and dense shrubs or thickets.
To flow or run over the top, brim, or banks:
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  1. To flow or run over the top, brim, or banks:
  2. To be filled beyond capacity, as a container or waterway.
  3. To flow over or across; flood
To overrun with water; inundate.
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  1. To overrun with water; inundate.
  2. To overwhelm with a large number or amount; swamp:
  3. To overwhelm as with a flood
To go under or as if under water.
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  1. To go under or as if under water.
  2. To place under or cover with water or the like; plunge into water, inundate, etc.
  3. To sink or plunge beneath the surface of water, etc.
To cover with water; flood; inundate
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  1. To cover with water; flood; inundate
  2. To deprive of life by immersion in water or other liquid.
  3. To overwhelm
To plunge, as into a gulf
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  1. To plunge, as into a gulf
  2. To swallow up or overwhelm by or as if by overflowing and enclosing:
  3. To swallow up; overwhelm
To engage wholly or deeply; absorb:
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  1. To engage wholly or deeply; absorb:
  2. To baptize by submerging in water.
  3. To plunge, drop, or dip into or as if into a liquid, esp. so as to cover completely
To overflow over the brim (of a saucepan etc.)
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  1. To overflow over the brim (of a saucepan etc.)
To defeat completely and decisively:
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  1. To defeat completely and decisively:
  2. To present with an excessive amount:
  3. To turn over; upset:
(Law) The increase in the area of land due to the deposition of sediment (alluvium) by a river.
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  1. (Law) The increase in the area of land due to the deposition of sediment (alluvium) by a river.
  2. The creation of land caused by the gradual depositing, either by artificial or natural forces, of earth, sand, gravel, and similar materials along the shoreline of a river or ocean by running water. The new land becomes the property of the owner of the property to which it is attached, provided the accumulation is so gradual that it cannot be visibly perceived from moment to moment. See also accretion, reliction, alluvium, and avulsion. The creation of land caused by the gradual depositing, either by artificial or natural forces, of earth, sand, gravel, and similar materials along the shoreline of a river or ocean by running water. The new land becomes the property of the owner of the property to which it is attached, provided the accumulation is so gradual that it cannot be visibly perceived from moment to moment. See also accretion, reliction, alluvium, and avulsion.
  3. (Law) A gradual addition to land along a river, lake, etc., as through the deposit of sedimentary material
A violent and sudden change in the earth's crust.
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  1. A violent and sudden change in the earth's crust.
  2. A violent upheaval that causes great destruction or brings about a fundamental change.
  3. A devastating flood.
An eye disease in which the crystalline lens or its capsule becomes opaque, causing partial or total blindness
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  1. An eye disease in which the crystalline lens or its capsule becomes opaque, causing partial or total blindness
  2. Any strong flood or rush of water; deluge
  3. A waterfall in which a large volume of water flows over a steep precipice.
A heavy rainfall
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  1. A heavy rainfall
  2. Something that overwhelms as if by a great flood:
  3. In the Bible, the great flood that occurred in the time of Noah.
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  1. A heavy rain
  2. A heavy rain
  3. A heavy fall of rain.
A flood resulting from heavy rain or a spring thaw.
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  1. A flood resulting from heavy rain or a spring thaw.
  2. A stream or rush of fresh water flowing into the sea
  3. A sudden overflowing of a stream because of melting snow or heavy rain
(Egyptology) One of the three seasons of Ancient Egypt.
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  1. (Egyptology) One of the three seasons of Ancient Egypt.
A torrent, or flood
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  1. A torrent, or flood
(Computers) A condition in which a calculation produces a unit of data too large to be stored in the location allotted to it.
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  1. (Computers) A condition in which a calculation produces a unit of data too large to be stored in the location allotted to it.
  2. An overflowing or being overflowed
  3. An outlet for overflowing liquids
A swift, violent stream, esp. of water
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  1. A swift, violent stream, esp. of water
  2. A very heavy fall of rain
  3. A turbulent, swift-flowing stream.
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  1. A river flood; an overflow or inundation.
  2. A sudden heavy fall of rain.
  3. A freshet resulting from a downpour of rain or melting of snow.
A flow of water or air, esp. when strong or swift, in a definite direction; specif., such a flow within a larger body of water or mass of air
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  1. A flow of water or air, esp. when strong or swift, in a definite direction; specif., such a flow within a larger body of water or mass of air
  2. A flow of positive electric charge. The strength of current flow in any medium is related to voltage differences in that medium, as well as the electrical properties of the medium, and is measured in amperes. Since electrons are stipulated to have a negative charge, current in an electrical circuit actually flows in the opposite direction of the movement of electrons.
  3. A steady, smooth onward flow or movement:
Something moving along in a current of air or water:
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  1. Something moving along in a current of air or water:
  2. The rate of flow of a water current.
  3. A slow ocean current
A continuous movement or circulation:
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  1. A continuous movement or circulation:
  2. A residual mass that has stopped flowing:
  3. A stream or current.
(Physics) The rate of flow of energy, fluids, etc. across a surface
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  1. (Physics) The rate of flow of energy, fluids, etc. across a surface
  2. The rate of flow of water, as the tide or current, through a defined area
  3. An additive that improves the flow of plastics during fabrication.
The stem of one of these plants, used in making baskets, mats, and chair seats.
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  1. The stem of one of these plants, used in making baskets, mats, and chair seats.
  2. Any of a genus (Juncus) of plants of the rush family, having small, greenish flowers: rushes usually grow in wet places and the round stems and pliant leaves of some species are used in making baskets, mats, ropes, etc.
  3. A rapid, often noisy flow or passage:
(Chiefly British) A flash flood.
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  1. (Chiefly British) A flash flood.
  2. A sudden rush or increase.
  3. A sudden heavy fall of rain.
A steady current in such a flow of water.
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  1. A steady current in such a flow of water.
  2. (Computers) A steady flow of data.
  3. A steady current of a fluid.
A movement of or like that of a mass of water; violent rolling, sweeping, or swelling motion
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  1. A movement of or like that of a mass of water; violent rolling, sweeping, or swelling motion
  2. A coastal rise in water level caused by wind.
  3. A sudden, sharp increase of electric current or voltage in a circuit
Flood tide.
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  1. Flood tide.
  2. The periodic variation in the surface level of the oceans and of bays, gulfs, inlets, and estuaries, caused by gravitational attraction of the moon and sun.
  3. The regular rise and fall in the surface level of the Earth's oceans, seas, and bays caused by the gravitational attraction of the Moon and to a lesser extent of the Sun. The maximum high tides (or spring tides) occur when the Moon and Sun are directly aligned with Earth, so that their gravitational pull on Earth's waters is along the same line and is reinforced. The lowest high tides (or neap tides) occur when the Moon and Sun are at right angles to each other, so that their gravitational pull on Earth's waters originates from two different directions and is mitigated. Tides vary greatly by region and are influenced by sea-floor topography, storms, and water currents.
To overwhelm with a large number or amount; swamp:
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  1. To overwhelm with a large number or amount; swamp:
  2. To overrun with water; inundate.
  3. To overwhelm as with a flood
To cause to disappear; get rid of
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  1. To cause to disappear; get rid of
  2. To cover with water; flood; inundate
  3. To overwhelm
To plunge, as into a gulf
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  1. To plunge, as into a gulf
  2. To swallow up or overwhelm by or as if by overflowing and enclosing:
  3. To swallow up; overwhelm
To drive away with a rapid flow of a liquid:
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  1. To drive away with a rapid flow of a liquid:
  2. Squarely or solidly:
  3. To clean, rinse, or empty with a rapid flow of a liquid, especially water:
To overwhelm with a rush or great amount of anything
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  1. To overwhelm with a rush or great amount of anything
  2. To cover or engulf with a flood; deluge
  3. To cover with water, especially floodwaters.
To flow beyond the limits; run over
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  1. To flow beyond the limits; run over
  2. To be filled beyond capacity, as a container or waterway.
  3. To spread or cover over; flood.
To defeat completely and decisively:
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  1. To defeat completely and decisively:
  2. To turn over; upset:
  3. To present with an excessive amount:
To place under or cover with water or the like; plunge into water, inundate, etc.
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  1. To place under or cover with water or the like; plunge into water, inundate, etc.
  2. To go under or as if under water.
  3. To sink or plunge beneath the surface of water, etc.
To overpower or crush; overwhelm
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  1. To overpower or crush; overwhelm
  2. To cover with water; submerge.
  3. To overwhelm.
To overrun with water; inundate.
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  1. To overrun with water; inundate.
  2. To overwhelm with a large number or amount; swamp:
  3. To overwhelm as with a flood
To overwhelm as if with a flood; swamp:
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  1. To overwhelm as if with a flood; swamp:
  2. To cover or engulf with a flood; deluge
  3. To cover with water, especially floodwaters.
To defeat completely and decisively:
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  1. To defeat completely and decisively:
  2. To present with an excessive amount:
  3. To turn over; upset:
To become swamped; sink in or as in a swamp
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  1. To become swamped; sink in or as in a swamp
  2. To become full of water or sink.
  3. An area of low-lying wet or seasonally flooded land, often having trees and dense shrubs or thickets.
To cover with water; submerge.
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  1. To cover with water; submerge.
  2. To overpower or crush; overwhelm
  3. To overwhelm.
To cause (a liquid or granular solid) to stream or flow, as from a container:
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  1. To cause (a liquid or granular solid) to stream or flow, as from a container:
  2. To stream or flow continuously or profusely:
  3. To pour a liquid or particles into (a container):
To climb (a tree, mast, pole, etc.) using the hands and feet; shin (up)
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  1. To climb (a tree, mast, pole, etc.) using the hands and feet; shin (up)
  2. To fill with a swarm; crowd; throng
  3. To be filled or crowded; teem
To gather, press, or move in a throng.
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  1. To gather, press, or move in a throng.
  2. To press against in large numbers:
  3. To crowd into; fill:
To gather or go together in a throng
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  1. To gather or go together in a throng
  2. To walk, go, or pass at a slow, deliberate pace
  3. To move or go as a group or in large numbers:
Find another word for flood. In this page you can discover 76 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for flood, like: overflow, deluge, flash-flood, inundation, surge, tide, high-tide, freshet, torrent, alluvion and wave.