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Another word for temper

a-z
Verb
  1. To make or become less severe or extreme

    See also:

    increase

Noun
  1. A person's customary manner of emotional response

      1. The manner of thinking, behaving, or reacting characteristic of a specific person.
      2. One's customary frame of mind or natural disposition; nature
      3. A nature that is excitable, moody, capricious, volatile, etc.
      1. A kind or sort:
      2. The basic character or qualities of humanity:
      3. Heredity:
      1. The expression of this in speech, writing, or action
      2. One of the four fluids of the body, blood, phlegm, choler, and black bile, whose relative proportions were thought in ancient and medieval physiology to determine a person's disposition and general health.
      3. US spelling of humour.
      1. A habitual inclination; a tendency:
      2. A physical property or tendency:
      3. One's customary frame of mind; one's nature or temperament
      1. The natural color, texture, and appearance of the skin, especially of the face.
      2. The combination of the four humors of cold, heat, moistness, and dryness in specific proportions, thought in ancient and medieval physiology to control the temperament and the constitution of the body.
      3. General appearance or nature; character; aspect
    See also:

    be

  2. A temporary state of mind or feeling

      1. A more or less continuous body of minerals, igneous or sedimentary rock, etc., occupying a fissure or zone, differing in nature from the enclosing rock, and usually deposited from solution by circulating water
      2. Course or tenor of thought, feeling, action, etc.
      3. Any distinctive quality or strain regarded as running through one's character, or a speech, writing, etc.
      1. The Holy Spirit.
      2. An attitude marked by enthusiasm, energy, or courage:
      3. Strong loyalty or dedication:
      1. (Gram.) A characteristic of verbs that involves the speaker's attitude toward the action expressed, indicating whether this is regarded as a fact (indicative mood), as a matter of supposition, desire, possibility, etc. (subjunctive mood), or as a command (imperative mood); also, an analytic category based on this characteristic (mood is shown by inflection, as in Latin, or analytically with auxiliaries, as English may, might, should, or by both)
      2. A pervading impression of an observer:
      3. A predominant or pervading feeling, spirit, or tone
      1. That which is intended to induce laughter or amusement:
      2. US spelling of humour.
      3. The quality that makes something laughable or amusing; funniness:
    See also:

    feelings

  3. A tendency to become angry or irritable

  4. An angry outburst

    See also:

    feelings

  5. A prevailing quality, as of thought, behavior, or attitude

      1. An intonation, pitch, modulation, etc. of the voice that expresses a particular meaning or feeling of the speaker
      2. A general quality, effect, or atmosphere:
      3. The simple or fundamental tone of a musical sound as distinguished from its overtones
      1. A pervasive or essential attitude, quality, or principle:
      2. An attitude marked by enthusiasm, energy, or courage:
      3. Strong loyalty or dedication:
      1. A pervading impression of an observer:
      2. (Gram.) A characteristic of verbs that involves the speaker's attitude toward the action expressed, indicating whether this is regarded as a fact (indicative mood), as a matter of supposition, desire, possibility, etc. (subjunctive mood), or as a command (imperative mood); also, an analytic category based on this characteristic (mood is shown by inflection, as in Latin, or analytically with auxiliaries, as English may, might, should, or by both)
      3. A predominant or pervading feeling, spirit, or tone
      1. A region with certain prevailing weather conditions
      2. A region of the earth having particular meteorological conditions:
      3. A prevailing condition or set of attitudes in human affairs:
    See also:

    attitude

Another word for temper

Noun
  1. State of mind

      1. A person's characteristic disposition or temperament:
      2. That which is intended to induce laughter or amusement:
      3. Vitreous humor.
      1. (Music) A system of adjustment of the intervals between the tones of an instrument of fixed intonation: it may be pure temperament, in which the intervals are set exactly according to theory, or equal temperament, as in a piano, in which the pitch of the tones is adjusted slightly to make them suitable for all keys
      2. One's customary frame of mind or natural disposition; nature
      3. Disposition; temper.
      1. A physical property or tendency:
      2. A habitual inclination; a tendency:
      3. One's usual mood; temperament:
    See also:

    mood

  2. An angry state of mind

  3. The quality of being easily angered

  4. The quality of induced hardness or toughness in materials

      1. The state or quality of being hard (in various senses)
      2. The relative resistance of a mineral to scratching, as measured by the Mohs scale.
      3. The relative resistance of a metal or other material to denting, scratching, or bending.
      1. The state or quality of being sturdy.
      1. Resistance to lengthwise stress, measured (in force per unit of cross-sectional area) by the greatest load pulling in the direction of length that a given substance can bear without tearing apart
      2. The resistance of a material to a force tending to tear it apart, measured as the maximum tension the material can withstand without tearing.
      3. Alternative form of ultimate tensile strength.
  5. Composure

    See also:

    composure

Verb
  1. To soften or qualify

      1. To prevent (a person or group) from doing something or acting in a certain way:
      2. To hold back or keep in check; control:
      3. To hold, fasten, or secure so as to prevent or limit movement:
      1. To lead (a dog being walked) to the curb or some other place where it may pass its waste matter
      2. To check, restrain, or control (an impulse or activity, for example); rein in.
      3. To furnish with a curb.
      1. To calm the anger of; soothe or appease.
      2. To soothe the temper of; pacify; appease
      3. (Archaic) To reduce the rigidity of; soften.
      1. To fall off in degree or intensity; subside:
      2. To reduce in amount, degree, or intensity; lessen:
      3. To become less in amount, degree, force, etc.; diminish
      1. To cause to be less extreme, intense, or violent.
      2. To become moderate
      3. To preside over:
      1. To calm or soothe (a feeling, such as anger).
      2. To cause (a group) to end a rebellion or other violent action.
      3. To subdue or quell (an insurrection or conflict, for example).
      1. To operate or work (against)
      2. To make or become milder, less severe, less rigorous, or less painful; moderate
      3. To reduce, lessen, or decrease.
  2. To toughen or harden

      1. (Idiomatic, intransitive) To make or become mentally tougher.
      1. (Intransitive, figuratively) To cease or cause to cease.
      2. To preserve (meat or other foods, for example) by extracting the moisture.
      3. To become dry:
      1. To disappear below the horizon:
      2. To put in a specified position or arrangement; place:
      3. (Botany) To produce, as after pollination:
      1. To form (something) out of a fluid or plastic material:
      2. To change in shape. Used especially of the adaptation of the fetal head to the pelvic canal.
      3. To form into a particular shape; give shape to:
      1. To paralyze or make numb, as with fear; stupefy; stun
      2. To replace the normal cells of (organic matter) with silica or other mineral deposits; re-form as a stony substance
      3. To cause to lose vitality or become impervious to change; deaden:
      1. To stiffen with starch.
      1. To grow hard; harden.
      2. To cause to be firmly established
      3. To become firmly fixed or established.
      1. To solidify or coagulate:
      2. To cause to solidify or coagulate:
      3. To cause to come together to form a whole or produce a result:
      1. To concentrate; consolidate.
      2. To make or become solid, firm, hard, compact, etc.
      3. To become solid:
      1. To treat rubber with heat and (usually) sulphur to harden it and make it more durable.
      2. To subject to vulcanization
      3. To improve the strength, resiliency, and freedom from stickiness and odor of (rubber, for example) by combining with sulfur or other additives in the presence of heat and pressure.
      1. To become cemented.
      2. To join or unite with or as with cement
      3. To cover or coat with cement.
      1. (By extension) To make insensitive to hardship
      2. (Metallurgy) To form a hard, thin surface on (an iron alloy)
      3. To harden the surface or case of (iron or steel) by high-temperature shallow infusion of carbon followed by quenching.
      1. To make or become stiff or stiffer
      2. (Intransitive) To become stiff.
      1. To keep company; see socially. Often used with out.
      2. To pass time idly; loiter. Often used with out.
      3. To become cold or set:
      1. To harden or dry (something) by subjecting to heat in or as if in an oven:
      2. To cook (food) with dry heat, especially in an oven.
      3. To become hardened or dry by or as if by having been subjected to the heat of an oven.
      1. To make hard like brass.
      2. To join (metals) by melting nonferrous metals or alloys into the joints at temperatures exceeding 800°F (426.7°C)
      3. To solder (two pieces of metal) together using a hard solder with a high melting point.
      1. To become strengthened or hardened:
      2. To heat (glass, metals, etc.) and then cool, sometimes slowly, to prevent brittleness
      3. To subject (glass or metal) to a process of heating and slow cooling in order to toughen and reduce brittleness.
      1. To make hard, strong, or obdurate; strengthen:
      2. To cover, plate, edge, or point with steel.