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Tear synonyms

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A single tear.
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  1. A single tear.
  2. A single tear (clear, salty liquid secreted by the eye).
  3. The shape of a drop of liquid about to fall.
A very small drop, esp. of liquid
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  1. A very small drop, esp. of liquid
  2. A tiny drop.
(Medicine) Skin moisture noted as: dry, moist, clammy, or diaphoretic as part of the skin signs assessment
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  1. (Medicine) Skin moisture noted as: dry, moist, clammy, or diaphoretic as part of the skin signs assessment
  2. Water or other liquid causing a slight wetness or dampness
  3. That which moistens or makes damp or wet; exuding fluid;liquid in small quantity.
A discharging or being discharged
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  1. A discharging or being discharged
  2. Elimination of net electric charge from a charged body.
  3. (Electricity) Release of stored energy in a capacitor by the flow of current between its terminals.
Something done only to impress an observer
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  1. Something done only to impress an observer
  2. (Informal) Actions or remarks intended to conceal the facts of a situation.
  3. A solution, medicated or nonmedicated, applied as a cleanser for the eyes.
A hole or gap made by rending or tearing, as a torn place in cloth, a fissure in the earth, etc.
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  1. A hole or gap made by rending or tearing, as a torn place in cloth, a fissure in the earth, etc.
  2. An additional amount paid or accruing to the owner of an economic resource, as a tract of land, that is the result of some special or unique attribute, as a desirable location
  3. A stated return or payment for the temporary possession or use of a house, land, or other property, made, usually at fixed intervals, by the tenant or user to the owner
Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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  1. Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
  2. An extent of rough, broken water caused as by the meeting of cross currents or tides or the interaction of currents and wind
  3. A stretch of water in a river, estuary, or tidal channel made rough by waves meeting an opposing current.
(Sports) The small pit lined with a cup into which a golf ball must be hit.
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  1. (Sports) The small pit lined with a cup into which a golf ball must be hit.
  2. An opening in or through anything; break; gap
  3. A gap, usually the valence band of an insulator or semiconductor, that would normally be filled with one electron. If an electron accelerated by a voltage moves into a gap, it leaves a gap behind it, and in this way the hole itself appears to move through the substance. Even though holes are in fact the absence of a negatively charged particle (an electron), they can be treated theoretically as positively charged particles, whose motion gives rise to electric current.
A long, straight, narrow cut or opening.
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  1. A long, straight, narrow cut or opening.
  2. A cut or tear, esp. one that is long and straight
The result of lacerating; jagged tear or wound
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  1. The result of lacerating; jagged tear or wound
  2. An irregular open wound caused by a blunt impact to soft tissue.
  3. A jagged wound or cut.
A single thickness of hide split horizontally
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  1. A single thickness of hide split horizontally
  2. The feat, esp. in gymnastics, of spreading the legs apart until they lie flat on the floor, etc. in a straight line, the body remaining upright
  3. A break; fissure; crack; tear
An escape:
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  1. An escape:
  2. A sudden or marked change:
  3. The result of breaking, as a crack, separation, or opening:
A deep flesh wound.
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  1. A deep flesh wound.
  2. A long, deep cut
An instance of breaking open or bursting:
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  1. An instance of breaking open or bursting:
  2. The process of breaking open or bursting.
  3. A break in friendly relations.
A long narrow opening; a crack or cleft.
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  1. A long narrow opening; a crack or cleft.
  2. A long, narrow crack or opening in the face of a rock. Fissures are often filled with minerals of a different type from those in the surrounding rock.
  3. (Medicine) A break in the skin, usually where it joins a mucous membrane, producing a cracklike sore or ulcer.
A slight narrow space:
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  1. A slight narrow space:
  2. (Slang) Hard, pebblelike pieces of highly purified cocaine prepared for smoking: a highly potent and addictive form of cocaine
  3. A partial split or break; a fissure.
A part that has been cut from a main body:
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  1. A part that has been cut from a main body:
  2. A movie at a given stage in its editing:
  3. A reduction:
(Obs.) A breaking or being broken
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  1. (Obs.) A breaking or being broken
  2. A break in friendly relations
  3. An opening made by a breakthrough, as in a wall, line of defense, etc.
Injury or harm to a person or thing, resulting in a loss in soundness or value
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  1. Injury or harm to a person or thing, resulting in a loss in soundness or value
  2. (Law) Money claimed by, or ordered paid to, a person to compensate for injury or loss caused by the wrong of the opposite party or parties
  3. (Informal) Cost; price:
A shortcoming; defect; fault; blemish
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  1. A shortcoming; defect; fault; blemish
  2. (Countable) Something that makes something else less than perfect; a blemish, impurity, error, etc.
  3. (Uncountable) Those qualities or features that are imperfect; the characteristic, state, or quality of being imperfect.
To become torn or split; come apart:
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  1. To become torn or split; come apart:
  2. To tear or split apart or into pieces violently.
  3. To pull, split, or divide:
A stretch of water in a river, estuary, or tidal channel made rough by waves meeting an opposing current.
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  1. A stretch of water in a river, estuary, or tidal channel made rough by waves meeting an opposing current.
  2. To cut or tear apart roughly or vigorously
  3. To become torn or split apart
(Archaic) To take away by violence; seize; rob
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  1. (Archaic) To take away by violence; seize; rob
  2. To deprive (one) of something; bereave.
  3. (Archaic) To split, tear, break apart.
To separate, cut, or divide into two or more parts; cause to separate along the grain or length; break into layers
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  1. To separate, cut, or divide into two or more parts; cause to separate along the grain or length; break into layers
  2. To separate or break up through failure to agree, etc.
  3. To divide and share:
To cause deep emotional pain to; distress.
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  1. To cause deep emotional pain to; distress.
  2. To wound or hurt (someone's feelings, etc.) deeply; distress
  3. To rip, cut, or tear.
To play fast solos accompanied by special techniques on the electric guitar.
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  1. To play fast solos accompanied by special techniques on the electric guitar.
  2. To cut or tear into shreds
  3. To use a mechanical shredder to shred (paper documents, for example).
To open something by pulling on various parts of it.
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  1. To open something by pulling on various parts of it.
  2. To separate two people or animals that are fighting
  3. To become separated as a result of pulling
(Idiomatic) To damage.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To damage.
  2. (Idiomatic) To succeed dramatically in (an area of endeav) or against.
  3. To tear into pieces.
To pierce or disturb with sound:
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  1. To pierce or disturb with sound:
  2. To pull, split, or divide:
  3. To become torn or split; come apart:
To cut or tear apart roughly or vigorously
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  1. To cut or tear apart roughly or vigorously
  2. To become torn or split apart
  3. (Informal) To move with speed or violence
To be or become split.
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  1. To be or become split.
  2. To split; cleave
  3. To break into pieces, as by a blow; cleave or split asunder.
(--- Informal) To depart; leave:
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  1. (--- Informal) To depart; leave:
  2. To cause to function; operate:
  3. To publish in a periodical:
To separate, cut, or divide into two or more parts; cause to separate along the grain or length; break into layers
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  1. To separate, cut, or divide into two or more parts; cause to separate along the grain or length; break into layers
  2. To separate or break up through failure to agree, etc.
  3. (Slang) To depart; leave:
To draw or pull out, often with great force or effort:
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  1. To draw or pull out, often with great force or effort:
  2. To obtain (a substance, esp. an essence or concentrate) by pressing, distilling, using a solvent, etc.
  3. To draw out by effort; pull out
To remove or detach by grasping and pulling abruptly with the fingers; pick:
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  1. To remove or detach by grasping and pulling abruptly with the fingers; pick:
  2. To give an abrupt pull to; tug at:
  3. To pull; tug; snatch
(Informal) To put into effect; carry out; perform
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  1. (Informal) To put into effect; carry out; perform
  2. To remove from a fixed position; extract:
  3. (Slang) To draw out (a weapon) in readiness for use:
(Archaic) To shoot (an arrow, etc.)
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  1. (Archaic) To shoot (an arrow, etc.)
  2. To arrange or roll (lengths of cloth, for example) on or in a bolt.
  3. To start suddenly and run away:
(Brit.) To ride (a horse) at a fast pace
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  1. (Brit.) To ride (a horse) at a fast pace
  2. To hold, carry, or put in a bucket:
  3. To move or drive rapidly or recklessly
To hurry busily or with much fuss and bother
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  1. To hurry busily or with much fuss and bother
  2. To move or cause to move energetically and busily.
  3. To move busily and energetically with fussiness (often followed by about).
To move suddenly and fast
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  1. To move suddenly and fast
  2. To shoot (an animal, for example) with a dart, especially to inject a drug.
  3. To move suddenly and rapidly:
To throw so as to break; smash
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  1. To throw so as to break; smash
  2. To move swiftly or impetuously; rush
  3. To write hastily. Often used with off :
To hasten.
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  1. To hasten.
  2. To hurry; speed
To appear or occur suddenly:
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  1. To appear or occur suddenly:
  2. To move or proceed rapidly:
  3. (Slang) To think of or remember something suddenly:
To move swiftly; flit; fly
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  1. To move swiftly; flit; fly
  2. (Naut.) To change the position of (a rope, pulley block, etc.)
  3. To cause (time) to pass quickly.
(Brit., Informal) To leave quickly, as to escape creditors
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  1. (Brit., Informal) To leave quickly, as to escape creditors
  2. (Scot., North Eng.) To move to other quarters, esp. by stealth
  3. To move quickly from one condition or location to another.
To run away from; flee from; avoid
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  1. To run away from; flee from; avoid
  2. To move through the air by using wings, as a bird does
  3. Any of numerous insects of the order Diptera, having one pair of wings and large compound eyes. Flies include the houseflies, horseflies, and mosquitoes.
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  1. (Rare) hasten
  2. To hasten or cause to hasten.
To cause to move or act swiftly:
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  1. To cause to move or act swiftly:
  2. To move in a quick fashion.
  3. To cause to be or come faster; speed up; accelerate
To speed the progress or completion of; expedite:
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  1. To speed the progress or completion of; expedite:
  2. To move or act with haste; move faster than is comfortable or natural
  3. To cause to move or act more rapidly or too rapidly; drive, move, send, force, or carry with haste
To misrepresent one's skill in (a game or activity) in order to deceive someone, especially in gambling:
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  1. To misrepresent one's skill in (a game or activity) in order to deceive someone, especially in gambling:
  2. (Slang) To get, sell, victimize, etc. by aggressive, often dishonest means
  3. To move or act energetically and rapidly:
To strike or assail repeatedly with thrown objects:
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  1. To strike or assail repeatedly with thrown objects:
  2. To throw things at; strike with or as with missiles
  3. To move at a vigorous gait:
To cause (an engine with the gears disengaged, for example) to run swiftly or too swiftly.
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  1. To cause (an engine with the gears disengaged, for example) to run swiftly or too swiftly.
  2. Any of several extensive human populations associated with broadly defined regions of the world and distinguished from one another on the basis of inheritable physical characteristics, traditionally conceived as including such traits as pigmentation, hair texture, and facial features. Because the number of genes responsible for such physical variations is tiny in comparison to the size of the human genome and because genetic variation among members of a traditionally recognized racial group is generally as great as between two such groups, most scientists now consider race to be primarily a social rather than a scientific concept.
  3. To enter or run (a horse, etc.) in a race
To carry by means of a rocket.
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  1. To carry by means of a rocket.
  2. To soar or rise rapidly:
  3. A vehicle or device propelled by one or more rocket engines, especially such a vehicle designed to travel through space.
To cause to function; operate:
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  1. To cause to function; operate:
  2. To sew with a continuous line of stitches:
  3. (Nautical) To sail or steer before the wind or on an indicated course:
(Football) To run toward (a passer or kicker) in order to block or disrupt a play.
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  1. (Football) To run toward (a passer or kicker) in order to block or disrupt a play.
  2. To cause to move rapidly:
  3. (Football) To run with (the ball) after a direct snap from the center or after a handoff or pitchout
(Informal) To move or proceed quickly
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  1. (Informal) To move or proceed quickly
  2. To throw or otherwise propel (something) in a way that causes it to glide, float, or move steadily through the air
  3. (Nautical) To move across the surface of water, especially by means of a sailing vessel.
To ride on a scooter.
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  1. To ride on a scooter.
  2. To move or slide (something) quickly
  3. To walk fast; to go quickly; to run away hastily.
To clean things by vigorous rubbing and polishing
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  1. To clean things by vigorous rubbing and polishing
  2. To move swiftly; scurry.
  3. To remove as if by cleaning; sweep away; get rid of
(--- Slang) To give, send, or hand quickly:
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  1. (--- Slang) To give, send, or hand quickly:
  2. (--- Informal) To use up or waste (time, money, etc.)
  3. (Games, Sports) To hit, kick, throw, drive, or propel (a ball, marble, etc.) toward the objective
The ratio of the distance traveled by an object (regardless of its direction) to the time required to travel that distance.
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  1. The ratio of the distance traveled by an object (regardless of its direction) to the time required to travel that distance.
  2. To drive at a speed exceeding a legal limit:
  3. To cause to move or proceed quickly; hasten:
To run or race at full speed, esp. for a short distance
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  1. To run or race at full speed, esp. for a short distance
  2. To move rapidly or at top speed for a brief period, as in running or swimming.
To cause to move at a trot.
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  1. To cause to move at a trot.
  2. To cause to go at a trot
  3. To move quickly; hurry; run
To move, go, drive, etc. swiftly
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  1. To move, go, drive, etc. swiftly
  2. To move rapidly in a circular manner or as in an orbit; circle swiftly
  3. To move, carry, drive, etc. with a rotating motion
To whip (egg whites, cream, etc.)
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  1. To whip (egg whites, cream, etc.)
  2. To move quickly, nimbly, or briskly
  3. To move, remove, carry, brush (away, off, out, etc.) forcefully and speedily, as with a quick, sweeping motion
To throw or spin rapidly:
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  1. To throw or spin rapidly:
  2. To move or do something quickly:
  3. To move swiftly with or as with a buzzing or hissing sound
To throw or propel (a ball, for example) through the air.
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  1. To throw or propel (a ball, for example) through the air.
  2. One of a pair of specialized parts used for flying, as in birds, bats, or insects.
  3. To say or do (something) without preparation or forethought; improvise:
(Informal) To move or propel something with speed and force
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  1. (Informal) To move or propel something with speed and force
  2. To move or act with a speed that suggests such a sound:
  3. To cause to move with speed and force:
(Computers) To cause text or other graphics in a window or frame to appear larger on the screen.
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  1. (Computers) To cause text or other graphics in a window or frame to appear larger on the screen.
  2. To move while making such a sound:
  3. To simulate movement rapidly away from or toward a subject using a zoom lens or other optical device.
(Informal) In great haste
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  1. (Informal) In great haste
  2. (Informal) To hurry; hasten
  3. To go in haste. Often used with it :
To cut, tear, etc. (stitches) so as to open (a seam, hem, etc.)
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  1. To cut, tear, etc. (stitches) so as to open (a seam, hem, etc.)
  2. A stretch of water in a river, estuary, or tidal channel made rough by waves meeting an opposing current.
  3. (Informal) To move with speed or violence
To put or pack in a barrel or barrels
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  1. To put or pack in a barrel or barrels
  2. (Informal) To go at high speed
  3. To move or progress rapidly:
(Slang) To proceed at great speed
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  1. (Slang) To proceed at great speed
  2. To move ahead at full speed.
To check or cut off the growth or development of:
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  1. To check or cut off the growth or development of:
  2. To take a sip or sips of alcoholic liquor:
  3. To move quickly; dart.
The return derived from cultivated or improved land after deduction of all production costs.
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  1. The return derived from cultivated or improved land after deduction of all production costs.
  2. An additional amount paid or accruing to the owner of an economic resource, as a tract of land, that is the result of some special or unique attribute, as a desirable location
  3. A stated return or payment for the temporary possession or use of a house, land, or other property, made, usually at fixed intervals, by the tenant or user to the owner
(Old, Informal) A dissolute, dissipated person
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  1. (Old, Informal) A dissolute, dissipated person
  2. Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
  3. A stretch of water in a river, estuary, or tidal channel made rough by waves meeting an opposing current.
The production achieved during such a period:
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  1. The production achieved during such a period:
  2. An outdoor enclosure for domestic animals or poultry:
  3. A movement or flow:
Any completely unrestrained action
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  1. Any completely unrestrained action
  2. A spree or bout of unrestrained imbibing or eating
  3. A period of excessive or uncontrolled indulgence, especially in food or drink.
A noisy or confused quarrel.
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  1. A noisy or confused quarrel.
  2. (Slang) A noisy quarrel or fight; brawl
  3. A drinking spree; a binge.
A riotous drinking party.
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  1. A riotous drinking party.
  2. Joining with friends to drink alcohol.
  3. A noisy feast with much alcohol consumption.
Carousal.
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  1. Carousal.
  2. A noisy, merry drinking party
  3. (Obs.) A glassful drunk all at once, esp. as a toast
A drunkard.
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  1. A drunkard.
  2. A person who regularly drinks alcoholic liquor to excess; drunkard
  3. (Slang) A drinking spree
A carefree, lively outing.
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  1. A carefree, lively outing.
  2. A river, about 400 km (250 mi) long, of eastern Germany rising near the Czech border and flowing generally north to the Havel River at Berlin.
  3. A sudden indulgence in or outburst of an activity:
Any of the small, nocturnal, flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, which navigate by means of echolocation. They look like a mouse with membranous wings extending from the forelimbs to the hind limbs or tail. Altogether, there are about 1,000 bat species in the world.
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  1. Any of the small, nocturnal, flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, which navigate by means of echolocation. They look like a mouse with membranous wings extending from the forelimbs to the hind limbs or tail. Altogether, there are about 1,000 bat species in the world.
  2. (Slang) A drinking bout; spree
  3. A binge; a spree.
One that bends:
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  1. One that bends:
  2. (Slang) A spree, especially a drinking spree.
  3. (Slang) A drinking bout; spree
Hard liquor.
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  1. Hard liquor.
  2. An alcoholic drink; liquor
  3. A drinking spree
(Dial.) A small load or amount, as of wood or hay
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  1. (Dial.) A small load or amount, as of wood or hay
  2. (Slang) A bout of drinking or drug use.
  3. A drinking spree
A single tear.
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  1. A single tear.
  2. The shape of a drop of liquid about to fall.
  3. A single tear (clear, salty liquid secreted by the eye).
A loud utterance of an emotion, such as fear, anger, or despair.
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  1. A loud utterance of an emotion, such as fear, anger, or despair.
  2. A loud vocal sound expressing pain, anger, fright, joy, etc.
  3. A rallying call or signal:
A loud drawn out scream and howl.
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The act of one who or that which weeps
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  1. The act of one who or that which weeps
  2. Action of the verb to weep.
To pour or sprinkle water on; make wet:
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  1. To pour or sprinkle water on; make wet:
  2. To take on a supply of water, as a ship.
  3. To drink water

Synonym Study

  • Rend , a somewhat literary term, implies a tearing with violence the tree was rent by a bolt of lightning
  • Rip suggests a forcible tearing, especially along a seam or in a straight line to rip a hem
  • Tear implies a pulling apart by force, so as to lacerate or leave ragged edges to tear paper wrapping
Find another word for tear. In this page you can discover 121 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for tear, like: teardrop, droplet, moisture, discharge, eyewash, rent, rip, hole, slit, laceration and split.