Ridicule synonyms

rĭd'ĭ-kyo͝ol'
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Part of speech:
The object of such contempt
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A sort of vaudeville characterized by low comedy, striptease acts, etc.
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(Rare) A person or thing derided
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Vain or disappointing effort; futility
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The feeling or attitude of one who looks down on somebody or something as being low, mean, or unworthy; scorn
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A feeling or show of contempt and aloofness; scorn.
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(Nautical, in the plural) An assemblage or combination of tackles, for hoisting or lowering the yards of a ship.
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Alternative form of lehr.
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A disparaging or being disparaged; detraction
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A scornful tone or statement.
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(Sports) An exchange of strokes in a court game such as tennis or volleyball, ending when one side fails to make a good return and resulting in a point or the loss of service.
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A scornful or contemptuous action or speech; mockery; scoffing; insult
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A taunting, scoffing, or derisive look or gibe.
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(Informal, Chiefly Brit.) A foolish, contemptible person
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The act of one who taunts.
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A representation, especially pictorial or literary, in which the subject's distinctive features or peculiarities are deliberately exaggerated to produce a comic or grotesque effect.
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Such literary works collectively
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(Music) The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.
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An exaggerated or grotesque imitation, such as a parody of a literary work.
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The feigning of ignorance as a tactic in argument
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A form of wit characterized by the use of such remarks:
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Such talk or writing
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(Botany) Thin dry bracts or scales, especially:
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An instance of bantering or teasing.
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Light, playful banter.
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(Uncountable) A style of humor marked by broad improbabilities with little regard to regularity or method; compare sarcasm.
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Foolishness, silliness; the behaviour expected of a buffoon.
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Rough or rowdy play that can often result in unintentional physical harm.
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Foolish behaviour or speech.
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(Poker) A version of seven card stud where the worst poker hand wins (called lowball).
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One of many transverse pieces that provide an airplane wing with shape and strength.
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An arrangement or series of ribs, as in knitted fabric or a ship's framework
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The act of one who rags or teases.
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A cut of meat suitable or prepared for roasting.
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The aggregate fruit of any of these plants, consisting of many small, fleshy, usually red drupelets.
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(Idiomatic, informal) To tease, ridicule or make jokes about, generally in a pejorative manner.
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To laugh at in contempt or scorn; make fun of; ridicule
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To imitate in fun or derision:
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To tease or make fun of in a playful, good-natured way
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To copy or imitate closely, especially in speech, expression, and gesture:
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To say in a playful or mocking way:
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To dishonor by a comparison with what is inferior; to lower in rank or estimation by actions or words; to speak slightingly of; to depreciate; to undervalue.
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To make seem little, less important, etc.; speak slightingly of; depreciate
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To appear in true character
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To make known (something discreditable).
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To ridicule or attack by means of satire.
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To attack or ridicule by means of a lampoon
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To draw a cartoon of
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To collapse by letting out air or gas
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To imitate someone or something for the purpose of satirical humour.
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To tease (someone) good-humoredly:
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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To hold up to ridicule; mock.
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To move over, along, or through (a road, fence, area, etc.) by horse, car, etc.
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(Idiomatic) To tease someone; to lead someone on; to goad someone into overreacting. It usually implies teasing or goading by jokingly lying.
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To wash gravel, sand, or other sediment in a pan.
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Of, relating to, or resembling an ass.
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Unexpected and unbelievable; fantastic
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Mocking; jeering.
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Expressing derision; derisive.
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Deviating from the norm, as in conduct; odd; unconventional
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Going beyond reasonable limits; excessive or unrestrained
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Of or relating to farce.
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Foolish or silly, especially in a smug or self-satisfied way:
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Characterized by distortions or striking incongruities in appearance, shape, or manner; fantastic; bizarre
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Lacking sense or meaning; foolish; silly
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So absurd, ridiculous, or exaggerated as to cause or merit laughter
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Located far from civilized areas; remote:
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(Obs.) With the first last and the last first; inverted
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Deserving ridicule
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Eliciting laughter; ludicrous.
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Indulging in, or fond of indulging in, satire
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Abbreviation of Gibraltarian English.
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A lampoon, originally as published in public; a satire or libel on someone.
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A wooden framework on a post, with holes for the head and hands, in which offenders were formerly locked to be exposed to public scorn as punishment.
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The quality of being ridiculous; absurdity.
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A short, usually comic dramatic performance or work; a theatrical sketch.
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A light parody or satire
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The state of being stultified.
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To imitate or mimic, especially in a thoughtless or inept way.
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To expose or ridicule the falseness, sham, or exaggerated claims of:
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To say in a derisive manner:
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To find or get by looking around
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(Archaic) To write or utter a squib or squibs (against)
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To render worthless, useless, or futile
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To make witty or amusing remarks.
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To say with a laugh:
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(Now Rare) To look at, often specif., inquisitively, teasingly, etc.
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To abuse verbally; revile.
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subject to laughter or ridicule
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subject to laughter or ridicule
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To subject (someone) to laughter or ridicule.
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Synonym Study

  • Taunt implies insulting ridicule and often an attempt to provoke, esp. by jeering and repeatedly calling attention to some humiliating fact they taunted him about his failure
  • Mock implies contemptuous ridiculing, esp. by caricaturing another's peculiarities it is cruel to mock his lisp
  • Deride suggests scorn or malicious contempt in ridiculing to deride another's beliefs
  • Ridicule implies making fun of someone or something but does not necessarily connote malice or hostility he ridiculed her attempts to speak Greek
Find another word for ridicule. In this page you can discover 127 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for ridicule, like: scorn, burlesque, approval, derision, mockery, contempt, disdain, jeer, leer, disparagement and sneer.