Key synonyms

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A very simple design of key that usually has a cylindrical shaft (sometimes called a "shank") and a single, minimal flat, rectangular tooth or "bit".
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The definition of important is having great significance or consequence.
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On which something turns or depends; central, crucial, critical, etc.
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A method or process of dealing with a problem:
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The core or center:
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(Biochemistry) Being a substance that is required for normal functioning but cannot be synthesized by the body and therefore must be included in the diet:
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Highest, as in rank or office; foremost
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A key for drawing back or unfastening the latch of a door, esp. of an outer door, from the outside
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(Sports) The first game played in a competition
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An electronic password.
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Instrument to open a lock
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An answer is defined as something that is similar or a close copy.
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Something that explains, makes understandable.
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Information which may lead one to a certain point or conclusion.
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A piece of indicative information:
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The definition of a hinge is a movable mechanism that joins a door and a frame, a gate and a fence or other related things that need to open and close of a hinge is a central or important point that everything depends upon.
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The basic, central, or critical point or feature:
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The point or support on which a lever turns. The position of the fulcrum, relative to the positions of the load and effort, determines the type of lever.
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Lever is defined as a means to get something.
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The definition of core is the inside, central, basis of something, or the fibrous seed containing center of some fruits.
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The embedded part of an organ or structure such as a hair, tooth, or nerve, that serves as a base or support.
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(Botany) A long tapering root possessed by many plants (such as carrots and dandelions). [from early 17th c.]
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The nucleus is the center core of an atom that has a positive charge and that contains most of the atom's mass, or the central heart of an organization or group.
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(US, politics) The designation of specific projects in appropriations of funding for general programs.
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(Sports) A defending player who stays close to an opponent in order to mark them.
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A subjective indication of a disorder or disease, such as pain, nausea or weakness. Symptoms may be accompanied by objective signs of disease such as abnormal laboratory test results or findings during a physical examination.
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(Sometimes also used uncountably) A visible indication.
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A specific product, service, or provider so distinguished.
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A system of secret writing based on a key, or set of predetermined rules or symbols
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(Medicine) Code blue.
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A chemical compound that changes color and structure when exposed to certain conditions and is therefore useful for chemical tests. Litmus, for example, is an indicator that becomes red in the presence of acids and blue in the presence of bases.
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(Architecture, engineering, by extension) A detailed technical drawing (now often in some electronically storable and transmissible form).
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A board bearing a sign.
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A tip; confidential disclosure, hint, or warning
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(Physics) Designating or of a fundamental
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The definition of principal is the first or highest in importance.
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(Internet) An Internet address; URL.
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A coral island or series of coral islands forming a ring that nearly or entirely encloses a shallow lagoon. Atolls are surrounded by deep ocean water and range in diameter from about 1 km (0.62 mi) to over 100 km (62 mi). They are especially common in the western and central Pacific Ocean and are believed to form along the fringes of underwater volcanoes.
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A low island, coral reef, or sandbar
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(--- Informal) A location or area of intense activity:
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A critical value, factor, etc.
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A key played with the finger, as on a piano.
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The definition of a guide is someone or something that instructs others or shows others the way.
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An unattached kitchen counter providing easy access from all sides.
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(Obsolete or poetic) An island.
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A very small island
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Physical strength:
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(Computing) A string of characters used to log in to a computer or network, to access a level in a video game, etc.
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(Engineering) The distance from centre to centre of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; called also circular pitch.
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(Nautical) A stone or concrete structure on navigable water used for loading and unloading vessels; a wharf.
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(Naut.) A part of a sail which can be folded or rolled up and made fast to reduce the area exposed to the wind, as during a storm
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A mathematical base for a numeral system.
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Skeleton is the internal support for something or the most basic and essential part of something.
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The definition of a ticket is a printed piece of paper that gives someone the right to do or enter something, or a printed piece of paper citing a violation, or a list of candidates of a political party.
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Tonality is the quality of a tone, the combination of colors used in a painting, or how the tones of a musical composition are combined.
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The vital organs, as the heart, brain, lungs, etc.
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Of minor relevance or importance.
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Possessing some quality, or having been subject to some operation (as substitution), in the second degree; as, a secondary salt, a secondary amine, etc. Compare primary.
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(Rare) Without essence or existence; immaterial
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Having little or no importance; not essential.
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Not important; insignificant or petty.
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Small; unimposing
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Doubt; uncertainty
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The definition of a lock is a device or a tool for holding or securing, or an enclosed canal with a series of gates that raise and lower ships to the level of adjoining water.
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The definition of a formula is a group of mathematical symbols that express a relationship or that are used to solve a problem, or a way to make something.
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A regular itinerary of stops, or the path followed between these stops, such as for delivery or passenger transportation.
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(Countable, uncountable) Knowledge that is hidden and intended to be kept hidden. [from later 14th c.]
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Chief, in a political sense, as being the seat of the general government of a state or nation.
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Of fundamental importance; crucial, pivotal.
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The definition of first is someone or something that happens or acts before any others.
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First in physical position or place:
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Chief; principal:
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Designating a triad having intervals of a major third between the lower two pitches, and a minor third between the upper two pitches
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First in rank, order, or importance:
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Highest in rank, power, or authority:
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First in time; earliest
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First or highest in rank or importance; principal.
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First or highest in rank or importance; main:
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Of, situated at, or being the top; uppermost, highest, greatest, or foremost
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That by which something is done or obtained; agency
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The value needed to encrypt or decrypt a message. Keys can be symmetric or asymmetric. If someone wanted to keep information secret from another, he or she could utilize one of two strategies: either hide the fact that the information exists, or make the information that exists unintelligible to another. The value needed to encrypt or decrypt a message. Keys can be symmetric or asymmetric. If someone wanted to keep information secret from another, he or she could utilize one of two strategies: either hide the fact that the information exists, or make the information that exists unintelligible to another. Cryptography is the act of securing information by encrypting it, and cryptanalysis is the act of decrypting encrypted data to make a message intelligible. Cryptology is the area of mathematics that includes both cryptography and cryptanalysis. Modern cryptography uses algorithms, or complex mathematical equations, and secret keys to decrypt and encrypt information. A key is a number or a string that is typically fewer than 20 characters. Symmetric keys use the same key for decryption and encryption, whereas asymmetric keys are produced in pairs—one key encrypts the information and the other, “mirrored” key decrypts it. Thus, someone having only one key could not figure out the other key. A common question in security pertains to differences between 40-bit and 128-bit encryption in Internet browsers. The easiest way to break encryption in order to read the plaintext is simply to try all possible keys. To help indicate the relative degree of difficulty in carrying out this task, it is important to realize that a 40-bit key has one trillion combinations. So, it would take a lone computer many weeks to attempt all these combinations. A cracker with considerable time on his or her hands would likely need just a few weeks to decrypt a message sent across the Internet with a 40-bit browser. Furthermore, every increase in key length means that the key will take double the time to crack. For argument’s sake, if a computer needs one week to crack a 40-bit key, it will take twice as long to break a 41-bit key—and for a 128-bit key, it will need an estimated 309,485,009,821,345,068,724,781,056 times longer to break it. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website: http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html; Simpson, S. Cryptography Defined/Brief History. [Online, Spring, 1997.] University of Texas Economics Website: http://www.eco.utexas.edu/faculty/Norman/BUS.FOR/course.mat/SSim/history .html.
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The value needed to encrypt or decrypt a message. Keys can be symmetric or asymmetric. If someone wanted to keep information secret from another, he or she could utilize one of two strategies: either hide the fact that the information exists, or make the information that exists unintelligible to another. The value needed to encrypt or decrypt a message. Keys can be symmetric or asymmetric. If someone wanted to keep information secret from another, he or she could utilize one of two strategies: either hide the fact that the information exists, or make the information that exists unintelligible to another. Cryptography is the act of securing information by encrypting it, and cryptanalysis is the act of decrypting encrypted data to make a message intelligible. Cryptology is the area of mathematics that includes both cryptography and cryptanalysis. Modern cryptography uses algorithms, or complex mathematical equations, and secret keys to decrypt and encrypt information. A key is a number or a string that is typically fewer than 20 characters. Symmetric keys use the same key for decryption and encryption, whereas asymmetric keys are produced in pairs—one key encrypts the information and the other, “mirrored” key decrypts it. Thus, someone having only one key could not figure out the other key. A common question in security pertains to differences between 40-bit and 128-bit encryption in Internet browsers. The easiest way to break encryption in order to read the plaintext is simply to try all possible keys. To help indicate the relative degree of difficulty in carrying out this task, it is important to realize that a 40-bit key has one trillion combinations. So, it would take a lone computer many weeks to attempt all these combinations. A cracker with considerable time on his or her hands would likely need just a few weeks to decrypt a message sent across the Internet with a 40-bit browser. Furthermore, every increase in key length means that the key will take double the time to crack. For argument’s sake, if a computer needs one week to crack a 40-bit key, it will take twice as long to break a 41-bit key—and for a 128-bit key, it will need an estimated 309,485,009,821,345,068,724,781,056 times longer to break it. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website: http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html; Simpson, S. Cryptography Defined/Brief History. [Online, Spring, 1997.] University of Texas Economics Website: http://www.eco.utexas.edu/faculty/Norman/BUS.FOR/course.mat/SSim/history .html.
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The value needed to encrypt or decrypt a message. Keys can be symmetric or asymmetric. If someone wanted to keep information secret from another, he or she could utilize one of two strategies: either hide the fact that the information exists, or make the information that exists unintelligible to another. The value needed to encrypt or decrypt a message. Keys can be symmetric or asymmetric. If someone wanted to keep information secret from another, he or she could utilize one of two strategies: either hide the fact that the information exists, or make the information that exists unintelligible to another. Cryptography is the act of securing information by encrypting it, and cryptanalysis is the act of decrypting encrypted data to make a message intelligible. Cryptology is the area of mathematics that includes both cryptography and cryptanalysis. Modern cryptography uses algorithms, or complex mathematical equations, and secret keys to decrypt and encrypt information. A key is a number or a string that is typically fewer than 20 characters. Symmetric keys use the same key for decryption and encryption, whereas asymmetric keys are produced in pairs—one key encrypts the information and the other, “mirrored” key decrypts it. Thus, someone having only one key could not figure out the other key. A common question in security pertains to differences between 40-bit and 128-bit encryption in Internet browsers. The easiest way to break encryption in order to read the plaintext is simply to try all possible keys. To help indicate the relative degree of difficulty in carrying out this task, it is important to realize that a 40-bit key has one trillion combinations. So, it would take a lone computer many weeks to attempt all these combinations. A cracker with considerable time on his or her hands would likely need just a few weeks to decrypt a message sent across the Internet with a 40-bit browser. Furthermore, every increase in key length means that the key will take double the time to crack. For argument’s sake, if a computer needs one week to crack a 40-bit key, it will take twice as long to break a 41-bit key—and for a 128-bit key, it will need an estimated 309,485,009,821,345,068,724,781,056 times longer to break it. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website: http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html; Simpson, S. Cryptography Defined/Brief History. [Online, Spring, 1997.] University of Texas Economics Website: http://www.eco.utexas.edu/faculty/Norman/BUS.FOR/course.mat/SSim/history .html.
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Being of greatest importance; primary.
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The central supporting element of a whole.
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(Rare) A cornerstone
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An object, such as a spool or barrel, around which material is wound.
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(Uncountable, paintball, slang) Paintballs.
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a coral reef off the southern coast of Florida
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United States lawyer and poet who wrote a poem after witnessing the British attack on Baltimore during the War of 1812; the poem was later set to music and entitled `The Star-Spangled Banner' (1779-1843)
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An achene (a dry, one-seeded fruit) in which the pericarp is modified into a winglike structure adapted for airborne dispersal. The seeds of the ash, elm, and maple are contained in samaras.
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A dry, winged fruit, as of the maple, ash, or elm, containing the seed or seeds; samara
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To establish or recognize the identity of; ascertain as a certain person or thing:
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(Chess) To create by moving a piece out of another piece's line of attack.
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identify as in botany or biology, for example
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To see someone or something as different from others.
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Describe is defined as to give details about something to someone.
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A key that will open every one of a set of locks
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A thing on which something turns; specifically a metal pointed pin or short shaft in machinery, such as the end of an axle or spindle.
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To give a name or title to; entitle; style
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Find another word for key. In this page you can discover 101 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for key, like: skeleton-key, important, pivotal, solution, nexus, essential, chief, latchkey, opener, passkey and passe-partout (French).