This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

Deceive synonyms

Sorting by
Votes
To lead in the wrong direction.
1
1
  1. To lead in the wrong direction.
  2. To lead into error (of judgment); deceive or delude
  3. To give a wrong impression or lead toward a wrong conclusion, especially by intentionally deceiving.
To fool, as by false promises or wrong notions; mislead; deceive; trick
1
0
  1. To fool, as by false promises or wrong notions; mislead; deceive; trick
  2. (Obsolete) To frustrate the hopes or plans of.
  3. To cause to hold a false belief; deceive thoroughly:
To practice fraud as a means of obtaining money or property.
1
0
  1. To practice fraud as a means of obtaining money or property.
  2. To get money or property from (another) under false pretenses; cheat; defraud
  3. To engage in swindling others
To deceive or swindle
1
0
  1. To deceive or swindle
  2. To cheat or deceive or to practice trickery or deception.
To deceive by trickery; swindle:
1
0
  1. To deceive by trickery; swindle:
  2. (Sports) To position oneself closer to a certain area than is normal or expected:
  3. To deprive of or destroy the effect of through error or ignorance
(Archaic) To be more intelligent than
1
0
  1. (Archaic) To be more intelligent than
  2. To surpass in cleverness or cunning; outsmart:
  3. To get the better of; to outsmart, to beat in a competition of wits.
(Informal) To speak or act facetiously or in jest; joke:
1
0
  1. (Informal) To speak or act facetiously or in jest; joke:
  2. To act like a fool; be silly
  3. To toy, tinker, or mess:
(--- popularly) To steal something from in any way, as by embezzlement or burglary
1
0
  1. (--- popularly) To steal something from in any way, as by embezzlement or burglary
  2. To deprive (someone) of something belonging or due, or take or withhold something from unjustly or injuriously
  3. (--- Law) To take property from (a person) illegally by using or threatening to use violence or force; commit robbery upon.
To take something from by fraud; swindle:
1
0
  1. To take something from by fraud; swindle:
1
0
  1. To punish someone unjustly.
  2. To injure or kill.
  3. To subject to cruel or harmful treatment
To deceive with a hoax
1
0
  1. To deceive with a hoax
  2. To deceive or cheat by using a hoax.
To be false or disloyal to:
1
0
  1. To be false or disloyal to:
  2. To give aid or information to an enemy of; commit treason against:
  3. To help the enemy of (one's country, cause, etc.); be a traitor to
To pass (time) pleasantly; while away
1
0
  1. To pass (time) pleasantly; while away
  2. To deceive or delude (using guile).
  3. To deprive (someone) of something by guile or deceit; cheat:
To lure into danger, difficulty, or a compromising situation.
1
0
  1. To lure into danger, difficulty, or a compromising situation.
  2. To catch in or as if in a trap.
  3. (--- Law) To induce (someone) into performing an otherwise uncontemplated criminal act for the sole purpose of providing the basis for a prosecution.
  1. To entangle; to enmesh.
  2. To entrap; to catch in a snare or trap.
  3. To take or catch in or as if in a snare; trap.
To mislead or confuse by trickery; dupe
1
0
  1. To mislead or confuse by trickery; dupe
  2. (Archaic) To cover the eyes with a hood; to blindfold.
  3. To deceive or trick.
To cheat or trick; dupe
1
0
  1. To cheat or trick; dupe
To persuade or induce to do something by cajoling or wheedling.
1
0
  1. To persuade or induce to do something by cajoling or wheedling.
  2. To mislead by means of a petty trick or fraud; deceive.
  3. (Archaic) To cheat; to defraud; to beguile; to deceive, usually by small arts, or in a pitiful way.
To deceive by trickery; fool or cheat
1
0
  1. To deceive by trickery; fool or cheat
  2. To deceive (an unwary person).
  3. To swindle, deceive, or trick.
To deceive or cheat by trickery; dupe
1
0
  1. To deceive or cheat by trickery; dupe
  2. (Informal) To con, defraud, trick, to make a fool of, to humbug or impose on someone.
  3. To confuse; bewilder.
To defraud of money or property; swindle.
1
0
  1. To defraud of money or property; swindle.
  2. To cover or fleck with fleecy masses
  3. To cover with a fleece or similar covering.
To dupe; deceive
1
0
  1. To dupe; deceive
  2. To practice deception or trickery.
  3. To deceive or trick.
To avoid or evade
1
0
  1. To avoid or evade
  2. To surround or encircle with evils, enmity, etc.; entrap
  3. To get the better of or prevent from happening by craft or ingenuity
To abate, to cease gradually.
1
0
  1. To abate, to cease gradually.
  2. (Intransitive) To happen.
  3. To misrepresent something.
To direct the steering or course of (a vessel).
1
0
  1. To direct the steering or course of (a vessel).
  2. To trick or fool, esp. by glib persuasion
  3. To learn or commit to memory.
To defraud; swindle.
1
0
  1. To defraud; swindle.
  2. To cheat or swindle, as in a confidence game
(Informal) To get, arrange, or maneuver by cleverness, persuasion, etc., or esp. by craftiness, trickery, etc.
1
0
  1. (Informal) To get, arrange, or maneuver by cleverness, persuasion, etc., or esp. by craftiness, trickery, etc.
  2. To obtain or achieve by cleverness or deceit, especially in persuading someone:
  3. (Intransitive) To cheat or swindle; to use crafty, deceitful methods. (often with "out of" preceding the object)
To intimidate or frighten, as by a display of authority:
1
0
  1. To intimidate or frighten, as by a display of authority:
  2. A city of western New York at the eastern end of Lake Erie on the Canadian border. It is a major Great Lakes port of entry and an important manufacturing and milling center.
  3. To confuse or deceive:
To cut into and wound slightly:
1
0
  1. To cut into and wound slightly:
  2. To strike or catch at the exact or proper time; hit, guess, grasp, etc. exactly
  3. To cut short; check:
To do someone out of their due; to deceive or defraud, to cheat (someone).
1
0
  1. To do someone out of their due; to deceive or defraud, to cheat (someone).
  2. To defraud, cheat, or swindle:
  3. To get away without paying (a debt, etc.)
(Informal) To cheat out of money, etc.; also, to overcharge
1
0
  1. (Informal) To cheat out of money, etc.; also, to overcharge
  2. In fighting, to push one's thumb into the eye of
  3. To force out the eye of (a person) with one's thumb.
To cut the hair of
1
0
  1. To cut the hair of
  2. To enunciate with clarity and precision:
  3. To cut (an item) out of (a newspaper, magazine, etc.)
The outer covering of a vertebrate animal, consisting of two layers of cells, a thick inner layer (the dermis) and a thin outer layer (the epidermis). Structures such as hair, scales, or feathers are contained in the skin, as are fat cells, sweat glands, and sensory receptors. Skin provides a protective barrier against disease-causing microorganisms and against the sun's ultraviolet rays. In warm-blooded animals, it aids in temperature regulation, as by insulating against the cold.
1
0
  1. The outer covering of a vertebrate animal, consisting of two layers of cells, a thick inner layer (the dermis) and a thin outer layer (the epidermis). Structures such as hair, scales, or feathers are contained in the skin, as are fat cells, sweat glands, and sensory receptors. Skin provides a protective barrier against disease-causing microorganisms and against the sun's ultraviolet rays. In warm-blooded animals, it aids in temperature regulation, as by insulating against the cold.
  2. To become covered with skin or a similar layer:
  3. To cover with a skin or a similar layer:
To take beating or stirring
1
0
  1. To take beating or stirring
  2. To shape or break by repeated blows; forge:
  3. (Informal) To avoid or counter the effects of, often by thinking ahead; circumvent:
To simulate; feign:
1
0
  1. To simulate; feign:
  2. (Naut.) To lay out (a line) in long, parallel, partly overlapping lengths so that it will run out freely without kinking
  3. (Sports) To deceive (an opponent) with a fake. Often used with out.
(Informal) To swindle; cheat
1
0
  1. (Informal) To swindle; cheat
  2. To deprive (another) of something by fraud; cheat or swindle.
To use (candles, lights, heaters, etc.)
1
0
  1. To use (candles, lights, heaters, etc.)
  2. To cause a strong impression, especially by emotional intensity:
  3. To damage or injure by fire, heat, radiation, electricity, or a caustic agent:
To intrude oneself without welcome:
1
0
  1. To intrude oneself without welcome:
  2. To get (something) in this way
  3. (Informal) To use unethical methods; cheat:
To sell all of a product that is in stock.
1
0
  1. To sell all of a product that is in stock.
  2. (Idiomatic) To abandon or betray one's supporters or principles to seek profit or other personal advantage.
To betray by acting in contradiction to a prior agreement.
1
0
  1. To betray by acting in contradiction to a prior agreement.
  2. To betray or go back on
  3. (Informal) To betray (a person) by doing the opposite of, or intentionally failing to do, what one has promised
To catch, suspend, or connect with a hook.
1
0
  1. To catch, suspend, or connect with a hook.
  2. To cause to become addicted.
  3. To fasten by means of a hook or a hook and eye.
(Informal) To deceive, mislead, or trick (someone).
1
0
  1. (Informal) To deceive, mislead, or trick (someone).
  1. To search exhaustively.
  2. (By extension) To get money from someone using threats.
  3. To cause something to fall by shaking it, or something it is attached down.
(Slang) To deceive, trick, or cheat
1
0
  1. (Slang) To deceive, trick, or cheat
  2. (Slang) To lead (another) into a situation in which all possible choices are undesirable; trap.
  3. To leave one's opponent in the game of snooker unable to take a direct shot without striking a ball out of the required order.
To misrepresent one's ability in order to deceive someone, especially in gambling.
1
0
  1. To misrepresent one's ability in order to deceive someone, especially in gambling.
  2. (Informal) To cause to be done, prepared, sent, etc. quickly or too quickly; hurry
  3. (Slang) To sell or get by questionable or aggressive means:
(Idiomatic) To keep somebody falsely believing that one has certain intentions.
1
0
  1. (Idiomatic) To keep somebody falsely believing that one has certain intentions.
(Idiomatic) to deceive someone
1
0
To shower or let fall as or like snow
1
0
  1. To shower or let fall as or like snow
  2. To cover, obstruct, etc. with or as with snow
  3. Precipitation that falls to earth in the form of ice crystals that have complex branched hexagonal patterns. Snow usually falls from stratus and stratocumulus clouds, but it can also fall from cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds.
  1. To absorb or comprehend.
  2. To shorten (a garment) or make it smaller.
  3. To receive into your home for the purpose of processing for a fee.
To cause (someone) to become involved in something they are reluctant to do.
1
0
  1. To cause (someone) to become involved in something they are reluctant to do.
(Idiomatic) to mislead, to try to make someone believe a lie.
1
0
  1. (Idiomatic) to mislead, to try to make someone believe a lie.
  2. (Idiomatic) to encourage with the illusion of a romantic relationship.
To play or dance to jive music.
1
0
  1. To play or dance to jive music.
  2. (US) Alternative spelling of jibe.
  3. To speak to (someone) in an exaggerated, teasing, or misleading way.
To persuade, mislead, or obtain with a smooth line of talk:
1
0
  1. To persuade, mislead, or obtain with a smooth line of talk:
  2. (Informal) To persuade with fast, smooth, but often deceitful talk
  3. To use clever talk in order to persuade someone to do something rash.
To attract prospective buyers; be popular on the market:
1
0
  1. To attract prospective buyers; be popular on the market:
  2. To be sold; attract buyers: often used with reference to the rate of sale
  3. To give up or surrender in exchange for a price or reward:
(Informal) To trick, swindle, or cheat
1
0
  1. (Informal) To trick, swindle, or cheat
To present in a favorable light.
1
0
  1. To present in a favorable light.
  2. (Intransitive) To wear fancy dress.
  3. (Intransitive) To wear a costume.
(Intransitive) To commit an error, make a mistake.
1
0
  1. (Intransitive) To commit an error, make a mistake.
  2. (Intransitive) To fall or stumble.
  3. To cause (someone) to commit an error, trick into a mistake.
(Figuratively, informal) To cause someone hardship by cutting all their supplies off.
1
0
  1. (Figuratively, informal) To cause someone hardship by cutting all their supplies off.
  1. To affect
  2. (Intransitive) To change ones position or location, especially to someone's place of residence.
(Idiomatic) To flatter, especially with the intent of personal gain.
1
0
  1. (Idiomatic) To flatter, especially with the intent of personal gain.
To let someone or something come in; to admit someone or something in.
1
0
  1. To let someone or something come in; to admit someone or something in.
Alternative form of make a monkey out of.
1
0
  1. Alternative form of make a monkey out of.
To mislead by cheating or tricking; deceive
1
0
  1. To mislead by cheating or tricking; deceive
  2. To deprive (someone) of or out of something by deceit; cheat
  3. To deprive (someone) of something by guile or deceit; cheat:
To help the enemy of (one's country, cause, etc.); be a traitor to
1
0
  1. To help the enemy of (one's country, cause, etc.); be a traitor to
  2. To give aid or information to an enemy of; commit treason against:
  3. To break faith with; fail to meet the hopes of
To manage to get (one's way) by bluffing
1
0
  1. To manage to get (one's way) by bluffing
  2. To try to mislead opponents in a card game by heavy betting on a poor hand or by little or no betting on a good one.
  3. To engage in a false display of confidence or aggression in order to deceive or intimidate someone:
To mislead by means of a petty trick or fraud; deceive.
1
0
  1. To mislead by means of a petty trick or fraud; deceive.
  2. (Archaic) To cheat; to defraud; to beguile; to deceive, usually by small arts, or in a pitiful way.
  3. To persuade or induce to do something by cajoling or wheedling.
(Obsolete) To frustrate the hopes or plans of.
1
0
  1. (Obsolete) To frustrate the hopes or plans of.
  2. To cause to hold a false belief; deceive thoroughly:
  3. To fool, as by false promises or wrong notions; mislead; deceive; trick
To betray by acting in contradiction to a prior agreement.
1
0
  1. To betray by acting in contradiction to a prior agreement.
  2. (Informal) To betray (a person) by doing the opposite of, or intentionally failing to do, what one has promised
  3. To betray or go back on
To deceive (an unwary person).
1
0
  1. To deceive (an unwary person).
  2. To deceive by trickery; fool or cheat
  3. To swindle, deceive, or trick.
(Informal) To speak or act facetiously or in jest; joke:
1
0
  1. (Informal) To speak or act facetiously or in jest; joke:
  2. To toy, tinker, or mess:
  3. To deceive or trick; dupe:
To deceive or swindle by deception.
1
0
  1. To deceive or swindle by deception.
  2. To mislead or confuse by trickery; dupe
  3. To deceive or trick.
To practice deception or trickery.
1
0
  1. To practice deception or trickery.
  2. To dupe; deceive
  3. To deceive or trick.
To lead into error (of judgment); deceive or delude
1
0
  1. To lead into error (of judgment); deceive or delude
  2. To lead in the wrong direction.
  3. To give a wrong impression or lead toward a wrong conclusion, especially by intentionally deceiving.
  1. To absorb or comprehend.
  2. To shorten (a garment) or make it smaller.
  3. To receive into your home for the purpose of processing for a fee.
To deceive or swindle
1
0
  1. To deceive or swindle
  2. To cheat or deceive or to practice trickery or deception.
To deceive or dupe; hoodwink.
1
0
  1. To deceive or dupe; hoodwink.
  2. To confuse; bewilder.
  3. (Informal) To con, defraud, trick, to make a fool of, to humbug or impose on someone.
To cause to do something, as by persuasion or compulsion:
1
0
  1. To cause to do something, as by persuasion or compulsion:
  2. To possess an understanding of; know
  3. To get, take, receive, or obtain
To bluff, especially in poker
1
0
  1. To bluff, especially in poker
  2. (Stud Poker) To bluff when one holds four cards of the same suit (four flush) instead of the five in a true flush
  3. (Informal) To pretend to be, have, or intend something so as to deceive; bluff

Synonym Study

  • Betray implies a breaking of faith while appearing to be loyal
  • To delude is to fool someone so completely that what is false is accepted as being true
  • Beguile implies the use of wiles and enticing prospects in deceiving or misleading beguiled by promises of a fortune
  • To mislead is to cause to follow the wrong course or to err in conduct or action, although not always by deliberate deception misled by the sign into going to the wrong floor
  • Deceive implies the often deliberate misrepresentation of facts by words, actions, etc., frequently to further one's ends deceived into buying fraudulent stocks
Find another word for deceive. In this page you can discover 123 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for deceive, like: mislead, delude, swindle, trick, cheat, outwit, fool, rob, defraud, practice deceit and not play fair.