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Energy synonyms

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A furnace or other source of warmth in a room or building:
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  1. A furnace or other source of warmth in a room or building:
  2. (Slang) Adverse comments or hostile criticism:
  3. The quality of being hot; hotness: in physics, heat is considered a form of energy existing as the result of the random motion of molecules and is the form of energy that is transferred between bodies as a result of their temperature difference
(Physiology) The conductibility of a structure, especially the ability of a nerve to transmit a wave of excitation.
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  1. (Physiology) The conductibility of a structure, especially the ability of a nerve to transmit a wave of excitation.
  2. The property of conducting or transmitting heat, electricity, etc.
  3. The ability or power to conduct or transmit heat, electricity, or sound.
The power to control, persuade, influence, etc.; effectiveness
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  1. The power to control, persuade, influence, etc.; effectiveness
  2. The capacity to do work or cause physical change; energy, strength, or active power:
  3. Power or strength. Power or strength.
The military strength or economic or political influence of a nation or other group:
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  1. The military strength or economic or political influence of a nation or other group:
  2. The ability or capacity to act or do something effectively:
  3. Physical strength or force exerted or capable of being exerted:
Effective legal or binding force; validity
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  1. Effective legal or binding force; validity
  2. Active physical or mental force or strength; vitality
  3. Intensity, force, or energy
The characteristic, principle, or force that distinguishes living things from nonliving things.
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  1. The characteristic, principle, or force that distinguishes living things from nonliving things.
  2. Power to live or go on living
  3. Power, as of an institution, to endure or survive
The state or quality of being strong; physical power or capacity:
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  1. The state or quality of being strong; physical power or capacity:
  2. Effective or binding force; efficacy:
  3. The power to resist attack; impregnability
  1. Stamen
  2. Resistance to fatigue, illness, hardship, etc.; endurance
  3. Physical or moral strength to resist or withstand illness, fatigue, or hardship; endurance.
Dynamic reality; active energy; continuous change, progress, or activity.
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  1. Dynamic reality; active energy; continuous change, progress, or activity.
  2. Great energy, drive, force, or power; vigor of body, mind or personality; oomph or pizzazz
  3. The theory that force or energy, rather than mass or motion, is the basic principle of all phenomena
Liveliness or energy; enthusiasm.
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  1. Liveliness or energy; enthusiasm.
A force or principle believed to animate living beings.
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  1. A force or principle believed to animate living beings.
  2. A force or principle believed to animate humans and often to endure after departing from the body of a person at death; the soul.
  3. An attitude marked by enthusiasm, energy, or courage:
Energy and high spirits; vim:
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  1. Energy and high spirits; vim:
  2. Energy; vigor; liveliness; spirit
  1. Enthusiastic and energetic drive or ambition
  2. Initiation of action motivated by energy and ambition.
A powdered form of this, used in laundering for stiffening cloth, fabrics, etc.
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  1. A powdered form of this, used in laundering for stiffening cloth, fabrics, etc.
  2. A naturally abundant nutrient carbohydrate, (C6 H10 O5 )n , found chiefly in the seeds, fruits, tubers, roots, and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice, and varying widely in appearance according to source but commonly prepared as a white amorphous tasteless powder.
  3. A carbohydrate that is the chief form of stored energy in plants, especially wheat, corn, rice, and potatoes. Starch is a mixture of two different polysaccharides built out of glucose units, and forms a white, tasteless powder when purified. It is an important source of nutrition and is also used to make adhesives, paper, and textiles.
(Informal) Driving force; vigor; energy
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  1. (Informal) Driving force; vigor; energy
  2. The power supplied by steam under pressure
  3. Power; energy:
Energy, push, or aggressiveness:
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  1. Energy, push, or aggressiveness:
  2. A strong organized effort to accomplish a purpose:
  3. The means or apparatus for controlling and directing an automobile:
A basic unit of power in the FPS system, equal to the power needed to raise a weight of 550 pounds a distance of 1 foot in 1 second or a weight of 33,000 pounds a distance of 1 foot in 1 minute (746 watts or 42.41 British thermal units per minute)
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  1. A basic unit of power in the FPS system, equal to the power needed to raise a weight of 550 pounds a distance of 1 foot in 1 second or a weight of 33,000 pounds a distance of 1 foot in 1 minute (746 watts or 42.41 British thermal units per minute)
  2. A unit of power in the US Customary System, equal to 745.7 watts or 33,000 foot-pounds per minute.
  3. The power exerted by a horse in pulling
A return or opposing action, force, influence, etc.
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  1. A return or opposing action, force, influence, etc.
  2. The effect produced by an allergen
  3. An action that results directly from or counteracts another action, especially the change in a body's motion as a result of a force applied to it. Some reactions counteract forces and are not readily apparent. When an object rests on a surface, such as a table, for example, the downward force it applies to the surface is counteracted by an equal but upwards force, or reaction, applied by the surface.
(Eccles.) A word or words used in replying to or affirming a prayer, reading, or exhortation
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  1. (Eccles.) A word or words used in replying to or affirming a prayer, reading, or exhortation
  2. (Physiol., Psychol.) Any biological reaction or behavior resulting from the application of a stimulus
  3. (Electronics) The ratio of the output to the input, as for a given frequency, of a device or system operating under specified conditions
A source of physical or mechanical force or energy; force or energy that is at, or can be put to, work
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  1. A source of physical or mechanical force or energy; force or energy that is at, or can be put to, work
  2. The rate at which work is done, or energy expended, per unit time. Power is usually measured in watts (especially for electrical power) or horsepower (especially for mechanical power). For a path conducting electrical current, such as a component in an electric circuit, P = VI, where P is the power dissipated along the path, V is the voltage across the path, and I is the current through the path.
  3. The energy or motive force by which a physical system or machine is operated:
(--- Sports) Sustained, effective play that puts an opponent at a disadvantage:
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  1. (--- Sports) Sustained, effective play that puts an opponent at a disadvantage:
  2. A compelling or constraining influence, such as persuasion or negative attitudes, on the mind or will:
  3. The force per unit area that one region of a gas, liquid, or solid exerts on another. Pressure is usually measured in Pascal units, atmospheres, or pounds per square inch. &diamf3; A substance is said to have negative pressure if some other substance exerts more force per unit area on it than vice versa. Its value is simply the negative of the pressure exerted by the other substance.
The forward force produced in reaction to the gases escaping rearward from a jet or rocket engine
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  1. The forward force produced in reaction to the gases escaping rearward from a jet or rocket engine
  2. The force that propels an object in a given direction, especially when generated by the object itself, as by an engine or rocket.
  3. A driving force or pressure.
Something that propels; propelling or driving force
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  1. Something that propels; propelling or driving force
  2. A driving or propelling force.
  3. The process of driving or propelling.
The energy possessed by an object because of its position (in a gravitational or electric field), or its condition (as a stretched or compressed spring, as a chemical reactant, or by having rest mass)
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  1. The energy possessed by an object because of its position (in a gravitational or electric field), or its condition (as a stretched or compressed spring, as a chemical reactant, or by having rest mass)
The energy of a body that results from its motion
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  1. The energy of a body that results from its motion
  2. The energy possessed by a system or object as a result of its motion. The kinetic energy of objects with mass is dependent upon the velocity and mass of the object, while the energy of waves depends on their velocity, frequency, and amplitude, as well as the density of the medium if there is one (as with ocean waves).
The radiant energy emitted by the Sun.
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  1. The radiant energy emitted by the Sun.
  2. Energy in the form of electromagnetic radiation emitted from the Sun; especially that part of this energy that is converted into usable thermal or electrical energy by man.
  3. Energy derived from the Sun's radiation. Passive solar energy can be exploited through architectural design, as by positioning windows to allow sunlight to enter and help heat a space. Active solar energy involves the conversion of sunlight to electrical energy, especially in solar (photovoltaic) cells.
Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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  1. Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
  2. The force produced by a magnetic field.
  3. Power of attraction; power to excite the feelings and to gain the affections.
Ill will or conflict because of differences of opinion, temperament, etc.
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  1. Ill will or conflict because of differences of opinion, temperament, etc.
  2. Conflict, as between persons having dissimilar ideas or interests; clash.
  3. A force on objects or substances in contact with each other that resists motion of the objects or substances relative to each other. &diamf3; Static friction arises between two objects that are not in motion with respect to each other, as for example between a cement block and a wooden floor. It increases to counterbalance forces that would move the objects, up to a certain maximum level of force, at which point the objects will begin moving. It is measured as the maximum force the bodies will sustain before motion occurs. &diamf3; Kinetic friction arises between bodies that are in motion with respect to each other, as for example the force that works against sliding a cement block along a wooden floor. Between two hard surfaces, the kinetic friction is usually somewhat lower than the static friction, meaning that more force is required to set the objects in motion than to keep them in motion.
A measure of the difference in electric potential between two points in space, a material, or an electric circuit, expressed in volts.
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  1. A measure of the difference in electric potential between two points in space, a material, or an electric circuit, expressed in volts.
  2. Electromotive force, or difference in electrical potential, measured in volts and equal to the current times the resistance
A flow of water or air, esp. when strong or swift, in a definite direction; specif., such a flow within a larger body of water or mass of air
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  1. A flow of water or air, esp. when strong or swift, in a definite direction; specif., such a flow within a larger body of water or mass of air
  2. A steady, smooth onward flow or movement:
  3. A flow of positive electric charge. The strength of current flow in any medium is related to voltage differences in that medium, as well as the electrical properties of the medium, and is measured in amperes. Since electrons are stipulated to have a negative charge, current in an electrical circuit actually flows in the opposite direction of the movement of electrons.
A musical setting for a religious service
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  1. A musical setting for a religious service
  2. The installation, maintenance, or repairs provided or guaranteed by a dealer or manufacturer:
  3. The performance of work or duties for a superior or as a servant:
Great energy, drive, force, or power; vigor of body, mind or personality; oomph or pizzazz
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  1. Great energy, drive, force, or power; vigor of body, mind or personality; oomph or pizzazz
  2. Dynamic reality; active energy; continuous change, progress, or activity.
  3. The theory that force or energy, rather than mass or motion, is the basic principle of all phenomena
The collection of physical effects related to the force and motion of electrically charged particles, typically electrons, through or across matter and space.
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  1. The collection of physical effects related to the force and motion of electrically charged particles, typically electrons, through or across matter and space.
  2. Electric current used or regarded as a source of power.
  3. A property of certain fundamental particles of all matter, as electrons (negative charges) and protons or positrons (positive charges) that have a force field associated with them and that can be separated by the expenditure of energy: electrical charge can be generated by friction, induction, or chemical change and is manifested by an accumulation of electrons on an atom or body, constituting a negative charge, and a loss of electrons, constituting a corresponding positive charge
Gravitation, esp. terrestrial gravitation; force that tends to draw all bodies in the earth's sphere toward the center of the earth
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  1. Gravitation, esp. terrestrial gravitation; force that tends to draw all bodies in the earth's sphere toward the center of the earth
  2. Grave consequence; seriousness or importance:
  3. The fundamental force of attraction that all objects with mass have for each other. Like the electromagnetic force, gravity has effectively infinite range and obeys the inverse-square law. At the atomic level, where masses are very small, the force of gravity is negligible, but for objects that have very large masses such as planets, stars, and galaxies, gravity is a predominant force, and it plays an important role in theories of the structure of the universe. Gravity is believed to be mediated by the graviton, although the graviton has yet to be isolated by experiment. Gravity is weaker than the strong force, the electromagnetic force, and the weak force.
A force that causes a fluid or solid to be drawn into an interior space or to adhere to a surface because of the difference between the external and internal pressures.
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  1. A force that causes a fluid or solid to be drawn into an interior space or to adhere to a surface because of the difference between the external and internal pressures.
  2. The production of a vacuum or partial vacuum in a cavity or over a surface so that the external atmospheric pressure forces the surrounding fluid, particulate solid, etc. into the cavity or causes something to adhere to the surface
  3. The act of reducing pressure to create such a force, as by the use of a pump or fan.
(Economics) The sensitivity of changes in a quantity with respect to changes in another quantity.
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  1. (Economics) The sensitivity of changes in a quantity with respect to changes in another quantity.
  2. (Econ.) The degree to which the demand for, or supply of, particular goods or services responds to a change in price
  3. The ability of a solid to return to its original shape or form after being subject to strain. Most solid materials display elasticity, up to a load point called the elastic limit ; loads higher than this limit cause permanent deformation of the material.
Plural form of ray
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The radiation, including alpha particles, nucleons, electrons, and gamma rays, emitted by a radioactive substance.
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  1. The radiation, including alpha particles, nucleons, electrons, and gamma rays, emitted by a radioactive substance.
  2. Spontaneous emission of radiation, either directly from unstable atomic nuclei or as a consequence of a nuclear reaction.
  3. Spontaneous emission of ionizing radiation as a consequence of a nuclear reaction, or directly from the breakdown of an unstable nucleus.
(Grammar) A potential verb form.
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  1. (Grammar) A potential verb form.
  2. (Physics) A function whose mathematical derivative is a physical field, as a force or an electric or magnetic field
  3. The inherent ability or capacity for growth, development, or future success:
An act, process, or result of burning:
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  1. An act, process, or result of burning:
  2. Tissue injury caused by fire, heat, radiation (such as sun exposure), electricity, or a caustic chemical agent. Burns are classified according to the degree of tissue damage, which can include redness, blisters, skin edema and loss of sensation. Bacterial infection is a serious and sometimes fatal complication of severe burns.
  3. An injury produced by fire, heat, radiation, electricity, or a caustic agent.
Images or special effects created through animation.
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  1. Images or special effects created through animation.
  2. The art or process of making movies with drawings, computer graphics, or photographs of static objects, including all techniques other than the continuous filming of live-action images.
  3. The act, process, or result of imparting life, interest, spirit, motion, or activity.
The real or precise meaning; basic point
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  1. The real or precise meaning; basic point
  2. Physical power or strength exerted against a person or thing
  3. The capacity to do work or cause physical change; energy, strength, or active power:
Great or superior strength, power, force, or vigor
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  1. Great or superior strength, power, force, or vigor
  2. Strength or power of any degree
  3. Physical strength:
Inherent capacity for growth and development; potentiality.
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  1. Inherent capacity for growth and development; potentiality.
  2. The quality or condition of being potent.
  3. The state or quality of being potent, or the degree of this; power; strength
The rate at which work is done, or energy expended, per unit time. Power is usually measured in watts (especially for electrical power) or horsepower (especially for mechanical power). For a path conducting electrical current, such as a component in an electric circuit, P = VI, where P is the power dissipated along the path, V is the voltage across the path, and I is the current through the path.
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  1. The rate at which work is done, or energy expended, per unit time. Power is usually measured in watts (especially for electrical power) or horsepower (especially for mechanical power). For a path conducting electrical current, such as a component in an electric circuit, P = VI, where P is the power dissipated along the path, V is the voltage across the path, and I is the current through the path.
  2. National might or political strength
  3. The ability or capacity to act or do something effectively:
The high-jump component of the sport of show jumping.
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  1. The high-jump component of the sport of show jumping.
  2. Power, might or potency.
The property of being sprightly.
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(Informal) Driving force; vigor; energy
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  1. (Informal) Driving force; vigor; energy
  2. The power produced by a machine using pressurized water vapor:
  3. Power; energy:
The number of people constituting a normal or ideal organization:
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  1. The number of people constituting a normal or ideal organization:
  2. The state or quality of being strong; physical power or capacity:
  3. The ability to deal with difficult situations or to maintain a moral or intellectual position:
Initiation of action motivated by energy and ambition.
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  1. Initiation of action motivated by energy and ambition.
  2. Enthusiastic and energetic drive or ambition
(Cribbage) A call made by a player who cannot play a card because any card in his hand will carry the count above 31
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  1. (Cribbage) A call made by a player who cannot play a card because any card in his hand will carry the count above 31
  2. (Informal) The power of going; animation; energy
  3. (--- Informal) A situation in which planned operations can be effectuated:
Energy and high spirits; vim:
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  1. Energy and high spirits; vim:
  2. Energy; vigor; liveliness; spirit
The quality of being peppy.
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(Slang) Nothing; nil; zero:
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  1. (Slang) Nothing; nil; zero:
  2. Energy; vim:
  3. (US) Shortened form of ZIP code, the US postal code.
Find another word for energy. In this page you can discover 72 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for energy, like: heat, conductivity, force, power, vigor, vitality, strength, stamina, dynamism, vim and spirit.