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Steal synonyms

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To save; reserve:
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  1. To save; reserve:
  2. To take care of, or have and take care or charge of
  3. To retain possession of:
To put into a bag:
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  1. To put into a bag:
  2. To swell like a full bag
  3. (Slang) To quit, forgo, or give up on
To engage in plundering or burglary, as during a riot or natural disaster
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  1. To engage in plundering or burglary, as during a riot or natural disaster
  2. To take goods from (a place) by force or without right, especially in time of war or lawlessness; plunder:
  3. To take or carry off as plunder
To set apart for a specific use:
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  1. To set apart for a specific use:
  2. To take for one's own or exclusive use
To remove from use, consideration, etc.
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  1. To remove from use, consideration, etc.
  2. To discontinue the use of a drug or other substance, especially one that is addictive.
  3. To take back or away; remove:
To move (something) from where it is; lift, push, transfer, or carry away, or from one place to another
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  1. To move (something) from where it is; lift, push, transfer, or carry away, or from one place to another
  2. To take away; withdraw:
  3. To take off
(Law) The taking of personal property without consent and with the intention of permanently depriving the owner of it; theft: in some states of the U.S., and formerly in England, larceny in which the value of the property equals or exceeds a specified amount is grand larceny, and larceny involving lesser amounts is petit (or petty) larceny
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  1. (Law) The taking of personal property without consent and with the intention of permanently depriving the owner of it; theft: in some states of the U.S., and formerly in England, larceny in which the value of the property equals or exceeds a specified amount is grand larceny, and larceny involving lesser amounts is petit (or petty) larceny
  2. The wrongful appropriation of personal property with the intention of permanently depriving the owner of its possession and use. The wrongful appropriation of personal property with the intention of permanently depriving the owner of its possession and use.
  3. The unlawful taking and removing of another's personal property with the intent of permanently depriving the owner; theft.
To understand or interpret:
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  1. To understand or interpret:
  2. To carry in one's possession:
  3. To expose one's body to (healthful or pleasurable treatment, for example):
To steal (usually something small or petty); pilfer
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  1. To steal (usually something small or petty); pilfer
  2. To steal, to illegally take possession of.
(Intransitive): To commit theft.
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  1. (Intransitive): To commit theft.
  2. To commit, or get by, theft
  3. To take (something) by theft or commit theft.
To deprive (someone) of something belonging or due, or take or withhold something from unjustly or injuriously
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  1. To deprive (someone) of something belonging or due, or take or withhold something from unjustly or injuriously
  2. (--- Law) To take property from (a person) illegally by using or threatening to use violence or force; commit robbery upon.
  3. (--- Now Rare) To take by stealing or plundering
To steal; filch
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  1. To steal; filch
  2. To steal, especially in a stealthy way.
  3. To take the property of another, often in breach of trust; to appropriate wrongfully; to steal.
To illegally misappropriate property under one’s care, particularly property to which one has a public trust or fiduciary duty. To illegally misappropriate property under one’s care, particularly property to which one has a public trust or fiduciary duty.
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  1. To illegally misappropriate property under one’s care, particularly property to which one has a public trust or fiduciary duty. To illegally misappropriate property under one’s care, particularly property to which one has a public trust or fiduciary duty.
  2. To steal (money, etc. entrusted to one's care); take by fraud for one's own use
To take something from by fraud; swindle:
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  1. To take something from by fraud; swindle:
(Nautical, of a mast or rigging) To break under sudden pressure of violent wind.
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  1. (Nautical, of a mast or rigging) To break under sudden pressure of violent wind.
To turn aside.
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  1. To turn aside.
  2. To turn (a person or thing) aside from a course, direction, etc. into another; deflect
  3. To turn aside from a course or direction:
To perform cosmetic surgery on (the face, for example), especially in order to remove wrinkles or sagging skin.
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  1. To perform cosmetic surgery on (the face, for example), especially in order to remove wrinkles or sagging skin.
  2. To become raised or elevated; go up
  3. To take an imprint of (a fingerprint) from a surface
To levy, seize, or requisition (money, property, etc.), as for military use
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  1. To levy, seize, or requisition (money, property, etc.), as for military use
  2. To affect strongly, often favorably:
  3. (Law) To impose a constructive trust or a lien upon property, as a matter of equity, to protect a person without legal title but with a legally recognized interest.
(Physiol.) To pull (a part of the body) away from the median axis: said of a muscle
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  1. (Physiol.) To pull (a part of the body) away from the median axis: said of a muscle
  2. To restrain or conceal a person in order to prevent his escape or rescue. See also kidnapping.
  3. To take (a person) away unlawfully and by force or fraud; kidnap
To kidnap (a man) for compulsory service aboard a ship, especially after drugging him.
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  1. To kidnap (a man) for compulsory service aboard a ship, especially after drugging him.
  2. (Slang) To forcibly or deceitfully induce (another) to do something
  3. To induce or compel (someone) to do something, especially by fraud or force:
To steal (a child)
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  1. To steal (a child)
  2. To abduct or confine (a person) forcibly, by threat of force, or by deceit, without the authority of law.
  3. To seize and hold or carry off (a person) against that person's will, by force or fraud, often for ransom
To stop and rob (a vehicle in transit).
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  1. To stop and rob (a vehicle in transit).
  2. To seize control forcibly of (an aircraft, bus, ship, etc.), esp. in order to go to a nonscheduled destination
  3. To take over control of a vehicle or airplane by use of the threat of force. To take over control of a vehicle or airplane by use of the threat of force.
To remove without anyone's noticing.
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  1. To remove without anyone's noticing.
(Something)(idiomatic) To steal or abscond.
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  1. (Something)(idiomatic) To steal or abscond.
  2. (Someone)(idiomatic) To leave with someone with the intention of living with them or marrying them. Usually in secret because other people think it is wrong.
To search vigorously:
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  1. To search vigorously:
  2. To search (an area or container, for example) thoroughly, especially using the hands with the intent to steal or remove something:
  3. To take as plunder; steal
(Slang) To discharge from employment:
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  1. (Slang) To discharge from employment:
  2. To put into a sack or sacks
  3. (Slang) To dismiss (a person) from a job; discharge
To deprive of or destroy the effect of through error or ignorance
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  1. To deprive of or destroy the effect of through error or ignorance
  2. To foil or escape by tricks or by good luck
  3. (Sports) To position oneself closer to a certain area than is normal or expected:
To persuade or induce to do something by cajoling or wheedling.
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  1. To persuade or induce to do something by cajoling or wheedling.
  2. To mislead by means of a petty trick or fraud; deceive.
  3. (Archaic) To cheat; to defraud; to beguile; to deceive, usually by small arts, or in a pitiful way.
To pull or tear (an object) away from (someone)
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  1. To pull or tear (an object) away from (someone)
  2. To damage or break the threads of (a screw, for example) or the teeth of (a gear).
  3. To remove or take off (clothing or covering):
To take or appropriate unfairly or illegally:
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  1. To take or appropriate unfairly or illegally:
  2. To become soggy or full of holes when trampled; turn into mud
  3. To take or appropriate something unfairly or illegally.
To embezzle (funds) or engage in embezzlement.
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  1. To embezzle (funds) or engage in embezzlement.
  2. To steal or misuse (money or property entrusted to one's care, esp. public funds); embezzle
(Poker, usually "be counterfeited") Of a turn or river card, to invalidate a player's hand by making a better hand on the board.
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  1. (Poker, usually "be counterfeited") Of a turn or river card, to invalidate a player's hand by making a better hand on the board.
  2. To make an imitation or copy of (something), usually with the intent to defraud:
  3. To copy or imitate something without the right to do so and with the intent to deceive or defraud by representing the copy or imitation to be the original or to be genuine if no original ever existed (such as passing off a painting as a particular work by Claude Monet when, in fact, Monet never painted such a piece of art). To copy or imitate something without the right to do so and with the intent to deceive or defraud by representing the copy or imitation to be the original or to be genuine if no original ever existed (such as passing off a painting as a particular work by Claude Monet when, in fact, Monet never painted such a piece of art).
To engage in swindling others
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  1. To engage in swindling others
  2. To practice fraud as a means of obtaining money or property.
  3. To get by false pretenses or fraud
To present another's words or ideas as one's own or without attribution.
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  1. To present another's words or ideas as one's own or without attribution.
  2. (transitive or intransitive) To use, and pass off as one's own, someone else's writing/speech.
  3. To take (ideas, writings, etc.) from (another) and pass them off as one's own
  1. To embezzle
  2. To appropriate wrongly:
  3. To use something wrongly, or illegally
To subdue; tame:
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  1. To subdue; tame:
  2. To cause to be housebroken
  3. To train (a dog) to urinate and defecate outdoors and not indoors.
To commit burglary in (a building or other premises).
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  1. To commit burglary in (a building or other premises).
  2. To commit burglary.
  3. To commit burglary against (someone):
To coerce (into doing something) as by threats
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  1. To coerce (into doing something) as by threats
  2. To get or try to get blackmail from
To defraud of money or property; swindle.
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  1. To defraud of money or property; swindle.
  2. To cover or fleck with fleecy masses
  3. To cover with a fleece or similar covering.
To rob or despoil (a person or place) by force, esp. in warfare
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  1. To rob or despoil (a person or place) by force, esp. in warfare
  2. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war; pillage:
  3. To take booty; rob.
To deprive of money or property by violence; loot
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  1. To deprive of money or property by violence; loot
  2. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war; plunder.
  3. To engage in plunder; take loot
To deprive of something valuable, especially by force; rob:
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  1. To deprive of something valuable, especially by force; rob:
  2. To ruin, especially by destroying or removing what is valuable:
  3. To deprive of something of value by or as by force; rob; plunder
To go through (a place) stealing valuables and causing disarray; pillage:
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  1. To go through (a place) stealing valuables and causing disarray; pillage:
  2. To loot or pillage. See also sack.
  3. To make a vigorous and thorough search of (a place, person) with a view to stealing something, especially when leaving behind a state of disarray.
To furnish with a crib.
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  1. To furnish with a crib.
  2. To have the habit of crib biting
  3. To plagiarize (an idea or answer, for example).
To burglarize.
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  1. To burglarize.
  2. (Informal) To burglarize or commit burglary
(Idiomatic) To rob at gunpoint.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To rob at gunpoint.
  2. (Intransitive) To protect one's status.
  3. To put up by sticking.
To hijack (an aircraft)
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  1. To hijack (an aircraft)
To move (something) with a pinch bar.
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  1. To move (something) with a pinch bar.
  2. To draw a thumb and a finger together on a touchschreen to cause the image to become smaller.
  3. (Slang) To take into custody; arrest.
To make or obtain in a lively, energetic way.
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  1. To make or obtain in a lively, energetic way.
  2. (Ergative) To move (something) with a soft crackling sound.
  3. (Informal) To work or proceed with, or move, bring, or get by, energetic or vigorous action
To set free, as from oppression, confinement, or foreign control.
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  1. To set free, as from oppression, confinement, or foreign control.
  2. (Chemistry) To release (a gas, for example) from combination.
  3. (Slang) To obtain by illegal or stealthy action:
To try to grasp or seize a thing suddenly; grab (at)
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  1. To try to grasp or seize a thing suddenly; grab (at)
  2. (Sports) To raise (a weight) in one quick, uninterrupted motion from the floor to a position over the lifter's head.
  3. To take, get, or avail oneself of hastily or while there is a chance
To add on or attach, as a smaller thing to a larger; append
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  1. To add on or attach, as a smaller thing to a larger; append
  2. To add to as a condition, consequence, etc.
  3. To take or appropriate, esp. without asking
To buy (drugs)
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  1. To buy (drugs)
  2. To get hold of; gain or win:
  3. To seize, capture, take, win, steal, etc.
To hit with a sweeping motion.
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  1. To hit with a sweeping motion.
  2. To make a sweeping blow, stroke, or motion
  3. (Informal) To hit with a hard, sweeping blow
To skulk around; sneak.
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  1. To skulk around; sneak.
  2. To obtain or try to obtain by begging; cadge.
  3. To get or try to get something free of charge; sponge:
(Informal) To swindle; cheat
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  1. (Informal) To swindle; cheat
  2. To deprive (another) of something by fraud; cheat or swindle.
To steal something and run
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(Arith.) In subtraction, to take (a unit of ten) from the next higher place in the minuend and add it to the next lower place: done when the number to be subtracted in the subtrahend is greater than the corresponding number in the minuend
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  1. (Arith.) In subtraction, to take (a unit of ten) from the next higher place in the minuend and add it to the next lower place: done when the number to be subtracted in the subtrahend is greater than the corresponding number in the minuend
  2. In subtraction, to take a unit from the next larger denomination in the minuend so as to make a number larger than the number to be subtracted.
  3. To adopt or take over (something) as one's own
To steal (usually something small or petty); pilfer
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  1. To steal (usually something small or petty); pilfer
  2. To take (something, especially something of little value) in a furtive manner; snitch.
To steal or filch.
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  1. To steal or filch.
  2. To steal (a small amount or item).
To steal; filch
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  1. To steal; filch
  2. To steal, especially in a stealthy way.
  3. To take the property of another, often in breach of trust; to appropriate wrongfully; to steal.
To try to grasp or seize a thing suddenly; grab (at)
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  1. To try to grasp or seize a thing suddenly; grab (at)
  2. (Sports) To raise (a weight) in one quick, uninterrupted motion from the floor to a position over the lifter's head.
  3. To get (a small amount of sleep).
(Intransitive): To commit theft.
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  1. (Intransitive): To commit theft.
  2. To take (something) by theft or commit theft.
  3. To commit, or get by, theft
To uplift; elate:
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  1. To uplift; elate:
  2. To direct or carry from a lower to a higher position; raise:
  3. To reduce the sagging of (the face, breasts, etc.) by means of cosmetic surgery
To hit with a sweeping motion.
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  1. To hit with a sweeping motion.
  2. (Informal) To hit with a hard, sweeping blow
  3. To pass (a credit card or other magnetically encoded card) across or through an electronic device that reads it
To perceive by one of the senses:
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  1. To perceive by one of the senses:
  2. To buy (drugs)
  3. To get hold of; gain or win:
(Slang) To rob or steal
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  1. (Slang) To rob or steal
  2. To steal, rob, or hold up (something).
  3. To hold up; rob.
To catch, suspend, or connect with a hook.
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  1. To catch, suspend, or connect with a hook.
  2. (Basketball) To shoot (a ball) in a hook shot.
  3. To fasten by a hook.
To take a sip or sips of alcoholic liquor:
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  1. To take a sip or sips of alcoholic liquor:
  2. To take (the property of another) unlawfully; steal.
  3. To move quickly; dart.
To cause pain or discomfort to (a part of the body) by pressing or being too tight:
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  1. To cause pain or discomfort to (a part of the body) by pressing or being too tight:
  2. To move (something) with a pinch bar.
  3. To draw a thumb and a finger together on a touchschreen to cause the image to become smaller.
To be an informer; tattle (on)
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  1. To be an informer; tattle (on)
  2. To act as an informer:
  3. To steal (usually something of little value); pilfer
(Botany) To grow or spread along a surface, rooting at intervals or clinging by means of suckers or tendrils.
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  1. (Botany) To grow or spread along a surface, rooting at intervals or clinging by means of suckers or tendrils.
  2. To move along with the body close to the ground, as on hands and knees, in the way that a baby does
  3. To move slowly, stealthily, timidly, or furtively
To descend with little or no engine power, using airflow to control lift
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  1. To descend with little or no engine power, using airflow to control lift
  2. To cause to move or pass smoothly, silently, or imperceptibly:
  3. To flow or move smoothly and easily, as in skating
To hang out or wait around a location, preferably without drawing attention to oneself.
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  1. To hang out or wait around a location, preferably without drawing attention to oneself.
  2. To stay hidden, ready to spring out, attack, etc.; lie in wait
  3. To move furtively
To seek about or search for something busily and stealthily
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  1. To seek about or search for something busily and stealthily
  2. (Obs.) To tear or rend as a cat does a mouse
  3. A hand-held input device that is moved about on a flat surface to direct the cursor on a computer screen. It also has buttons for activating computer functions. The underside of a mechanical mouse contains a rubber-coated ball that rotates as the mouse is moved; optical sensors detect the motion and move the screen pointer correspondingly. An optical mouse is cordless and uses reflections from an LED to track the mouse's movement over a special reflective mat which is marked with a grid that acts as a frame of reference.
To roam about furtively, as in search of prey or loot
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  1. To roam about furtively, as in search of prey or loot
  2. To roam through stealthily, as in search of prey or plunder:
  3. To rove furtively or with predatory intent:
To move with stealth or caution, like a cat
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  1. To move with stealth or caution, like a cat
  2. To shy away from a definite commitment or from decisive action
  3. To move stealthily or cautiously.
(Chiefly Brit.) To avoid work or responsibility; shirk; malinger
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  1. (Chiefly Brit.) To avoid work or responsibility; shirk; malinger
  2. To conceal oneself; to hide
  3. To move or lurk about in a stealthy, craven, or sinister manner; slink
To move quietly and smoothly; glide
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  1. To move quietly and smoothly; glide
  2. (--- Baseball) To drop down from a running into a lying or diving position when approaching a base so as to avoid being tagged out.
  3. To move in this manner on a sled, the feet, etc. in contact with a smooth surface, esp. snow or ice
To give birth to prematurely:
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  1. To give birth to prematurely:
  2. To move in a quiet furtive manner; sneak:
  3. To move in a quiet, furtive, or sneaking manner, as from fear, guilt, etc.; sneak
To put on or remove a piece of clothing smoothly or quietly:
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  1. To put on or remove a piece of clothing smoothly or quietly:
  2. To move smoothly, easily, and quietly:
  3. To release, loose, or unfasten:
To pull with quick jerks.
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  1. To pull with quick jerks.
  2. (Informal) To pull quickly
  3. To clear obstructions from (a pipe, drain, etc.) by means of a snake
To go or move in a quiet, stealthy way.
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  1. To go or move in a quiet, stealthy way.
  2. To move quietly and stealthily so as to avoid being seen or heard; go furtively
  3. To move, give, take, or put in a quiet, stealthy manner:
To work as a detective.
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  1. To work as a detective.
  2. To sneak or go about quietly, as a detective; act with stealth
  3. To move about stealthily; sneak.
Something pilfered
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  1. Something pilfered
  2. The act or practice of pilfering
  3. A recurrent theft of small items of little value.
An instance of such taking:
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  1. An instance of such taking:
  2. In its broadest sense, any example or act of stealing, which includes burglary, embezzlement, false pretenses, fraud, and larceny. While larceny is generally categorized as petty or grand depending on the value of the goods taken, theft is generally categorized by the type of property stolen.
  3. The unlawful taking of the property of another; larceny:
The act or practice of stealing or an instance of this; theft
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  1. The act or practice of stealing or an instance of this; theft
A product or service that is overpriced or of poor quality.
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  1. A product or service that is overpriced or of poor quality.
  2. A product that is overpriced, esp. one that is inferior or an imitation
  3. A theft.
An agreement establishing the terms of a sale or exchange of goods or services:
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  1. An agreement establishing the terms of a sale or exchange of goods or services:
  2. Such an agreement considered in terms of its worth to one of the parties
  3. Something offered or acquired at a price advantageous to the buyer:
Anything bought or buyable, esp. with reference to its worth as a bargain
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  1. Anything bought or buyable, esp. with reference to its worth as a bargain
  2. Something bought or for sale; a purchase.
  3. An act of purchasing:
A player's turn or right to deal
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  1. A player's turn or right to deal
  2. (Informal) Treatment received:
  3. A business transaction:
Find another word for steal. In this page you can discover 108 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for steal, like: keep, bag, loot, appropriate, withdraw, remove, larceny, take, filch, thieve and rob.