Sin synonyms

sĭn
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The act or an instance of deviating from an accepted code of behavior.
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(Countable) An instance of doing wrong.
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(Law) Any of various torts involving interference to another's enjoyment of his property, especially the act of being present on another's land without lawful excuse.
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Immoral behavior
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(Uncountable) The practice or habit of committing crimes.
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The state of being ungodly.
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The state of being unrighteous.
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(Uncountable) The quality of being venial (pardonable).
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(Brit., Slang) To make a stupid mistake
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To err is defined as to make a mistake or to do something wrong.
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To hurt the feelings of; cause to feel resentful, angry, or displeased; insult
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To misbehave is to behave badly.
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Fall is defined as to drop or come down, often unexpectedly.
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To fall or pass from one proprietor to another, or from the original destination, by the omission, negligence, or failure of somebody, such as a patron or legatee.
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(Idiomatic, of a male) To spread one's genes around by impregnating many females.
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To rebel against authority; to defy orders or instructions.
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(Figuratively, idiomatic)
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To regress; to slip backwards or revert to a previous, worse state.
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(Intransitive, idiomatic) To cohabit as if man and wife without being married.
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(Idiomatic) To have numerous sexual partners.
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(Theology) The state of being right with God; justification; the work of Christ, which is the ground justification.
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The condition and quality of being godly, pious, scrupulously observant of all the teaching's of one's religion, practicing virtue and avoiding sin.
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(Uncountable) Accordance with moral principles; conformity of behaviour or thought with the strictures of morality; good moral conduct. [from 13th c.]
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To bring great evil upon; to be the cause of serious harm or unhappiness to; to furnish with that which will be a cause of deep trouble; to afflict or injure grievously; to harass or torment.
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To make (a person) believe what is not true; delude; mislead
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To thwart passage of; veto:
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To get or effect surreptitiously or artfully.
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The definition of culpable is deserving of blame.
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Also corrupt in a moral sense, or disposition.
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Characterized by extremely brutal or cruel crimes; vicious.
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The definition of heinous is very evil or horrible.
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Showing iniquity; wicked; unjust
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Liable to sin; subject to transgress the divine law.
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Making expiation or atonement for a sacrilege:
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Having or exhibiting no remorse.
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(Roman Catholic Church) Minor, therefore warranting only temporal punishment.
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Severe and distressing:
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A wrongful act under law, such as a tort or a criminal offense.
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(Countable) A particular depraved act or trait.
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The definition of a misdemeanor is a criminal offense more serious than an infraction and less serious than a felony. Federal criminal law classifies a misdemeanor as one in which the maximum punishment in terms of jail time is less than one year. Approximately half of the state legal systems also use this classification. In other states, the classification of a misdemeanor is a crime in which the only punishments that can be handed down are fines or jail time. In those states, crimes allowing any other punishment, such as seizure of property or the death penalty, would automatically be felonies.
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The act of breaking a law; sin or crime; transgression
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The definition of a peccadillo is a small or unimportant sin or wrongdoing.
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(Rare) Faultiness, a state of being flawed.
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To feel envy toward (another person).
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In an evil manner.
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To find fault with; blame or criticize
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To cause someone to do something by arousing feelings of guilt:
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To have an intense desire, especially one that is sexual.
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(Figuratively, colloquial) To kick someone's ass or chew someone out (used to express one's anger at somebody).
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(Rare) To make proud
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To fit into place readily or easily in a slot
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(Intransitive) To wander from company, or from the proper limits; to rove at large; to roam; to go astray.
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To hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice.
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To disregard or act in a manner that does not conform to (a law or promise, for example).
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To wrong is to act improperly towards someone or to improperly accuse someone of something bad.
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The definition of goodness is kindness, generosity or beneficial.
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The character of being in accord with the principles or standards of right conduct; right conduct; sometimes, specif., virtue in sexual conduct
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(Uncountable) The way a device or system operates.
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(Slang) Incriminating information or evidence:
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To act, react, function, or perform in a particular way:
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To act in accordance (with a request, order, rule, etc.)
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To carry out or fulfill the command, order, or instruction of.
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An act of mischief, cruelty, or witchcraft.
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Representation of devils or demons, as in paintings or fiction.
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An evil or wicked act or behaviour, especially such a crime.
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The definition of an outrage is an act of violence or an insult.
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All or part of the right side
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The act of committing a sin.
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In various religions, the place where some or all spirits are believed to go after death
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(Uncountable) The property of being sinful.
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In a right triangle, the ratio of the length of the side opposite an acute angle to the length of the hypotenuse.
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(Idiomatic) To fail in one's responsibilities or duties, or to make a mistake, especially at a critical point or when the result is very negative.
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To move clumsily or carelessly; flounder; stumble
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To make a mistake; blunder, fail, etc.
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The state or quality of being peccable; liability to sin.
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Find another word for sin. In this page you can discover 107 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for sin, like: do wrong, error, wrongdoing, trespass, transgression, wickedness, , iniquity, immorality, crime and ungodliness.