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Gall synonyms

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To be irritating, wearisome, or vexing to.
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  1. To be irritating, wearisome, or vexing to.
  2. To annoy, disgust, irritate, tire out, etc.
An attitude of scornful or jaded negativity, especially a general distrust of the integrity or professed motives of others:
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  1. An attitude of scornful or jaded negativity, especially a general distrust of the integrity or professed motives of others:
  2. (Uncountable) a distrustful attitude
  3. (Uncountable) an emotion of jaded negativity, or a general distrust of the integrity or professed motives of other people. Cynicism can manifest itself by frustration, disillusionment and distrust in regard to organizations, authorities and other aspects of society, often due to previous bad experience. Cynics often view others as motivated solely by disguised self-interest.
A continuing and bitter hate or ill will; deep spite or malice
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  1. A continuing and bitter hate or ill will; deep spite or malice
  2. Bitter, long-lasting resentment; deep-seated ill will:
Brazen boldness; presumptuousness.
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  1. Brazen boldness; presumptuousness.
  2. An act or instance of this
  3. Unashamed boldness; impudence; audacity; presumption
Foolish or rash boldness; foolhardiness; recklessness
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  1. Foolish or rash boldness; foolhardiness; recklessness
  2. Excessive boldness or rashness; foolhardiness or recklessness.
(Countable) An instance of this; a moment of being impertinent.
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  1. (Countable) An instance of this; a moment of being impertinent.
  2. An impertinent act, remark, etc.
  3. Insolence.
To cause irritation to (another); make somewhat angry.
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  1. To cause irritation to (another); make somewhat angry.
  2. (Archaic) To harass or disturb by repeated attacks.
  3. To harm by repeated attacks; harry; molest
To cause someone to feel impatient or angry; annoy:
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  1. To cause someone to feel impatient or angry; annoy:
  2. (Physiology) To cause a physiological response to a stimulus in (a cell, body tissue, or organism).
  3. To be a cause of impatience or anger.
Bitterness or harshness of temper, manner, or speech; asperity
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  1. Bitterness or harshness of temper, manner, or speech; asperity
  2. Bitter, sharp animosity, especially as exhibited in speech or behavior.
(Countable) Something which embitters
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  1. (Countable) Something which embitters
  2. (Uncountable) The state of being embittered
A continuing and bitter hate or ill will; deep spite or malice
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  1. A continuing and bitter hate or ill will; deep spite or malice
  2. Bitter, long-lasting resentment; deep-seated ill will:
The characteristic of being resentful.
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  1. The characteristic of being resentful.
A feeling of displeasure and indignation, from a sense of being injured or offended
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  1. A feeling of displeasure and indignation, from a sense of being injured or offended
  2. Indignation or ill will stemming from a feeling of having been wronged or offended.
The relative infectiousness of a microorganism causing disease
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  1. The relative infectiousness of a microorganism causing disease
  2. A measure of how virulent a thing is
  3. Bitter animosity; venom; rancor
The act of taking for or on oneself, especially accepting, or agreeing to take the responsibility for, the obligation of another.
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  1. The act of taking for or on oneself, especially accepting, or agreeing to take the responsibility for, the obligation of another.
  2. (R.C.Ch.) The taking up of the body and soul of the Virgin Mary into heaven after her death
  3. Something taken for granted or accepted as true without proof; a supposition:
Fearless daring; intrepidity.
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  1. Fearless daring; intrepidity.
  2. Bold courage; daring
  3. An act or instance of intrepidity or insolent heedlessness:
(Typography) The relative weight of a font; the thickness of its strokes.
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  1. (Typography) The relative weight of a font; the thickness of its strokes.
  2. The state of being bold; courage; presumptuousness.
The characteristic of being brash.
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  1. The characteristic of being brash.
The characteristic of being brazen.
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  1. The characteristic of being brazen.
Something resembling the cheek in shape or position.
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  1. Something resembling the cheek in shape or position.
  2. Impertinent boldness:
  3. Either side of the face between the nose and ear, below the eye
The state of being cheeky
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(Slang) Nearly arrogant courage; utter audacity, effrontery or impudence; supreme self-confidence; exaggerated self-opinion;
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  1. (Slang) Nearly arrogant courage; utter audacity, effrontery or impudence; supreme self-confidence; exaggerated self-opinion;
  2. (Informal) Shameless audacity; impudence; brass
  3. Utter nerve; effrontery:
Lack of courtesy; rudeness.
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  1. Lack of courtesy; rudeness.
  2. A rude act or statement.
  3. Lack of courtesy; impoliteness; bad manners; rudeness
Lack of respect, esteem, or courteous regard.
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  1. Lack of respect, esteem, or courteous regard.
Brazen boldness; presumptuousness.
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  1. Brazen boldness; presumptuousness.
  2. Unashamed boldness; impudence; audacity; presumption
  3. An act or instance of this
Facial cosmetics:
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  1. Facial cosmetics:
  2. Effrontery; impudence:
  3. A person's countenance:
Close acquaintance (with something)
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  1. Close acquaintance (with something)
  2. The quality of being known from past experience:
  3. Acquaintance with or knowledge of something:
The quality of being forward.
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(Uncountable) The fact or character of being out of place; inappropriateness.
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  1. (Uncountable) The fact or character of being out of place; inappropriateness.
  2. The quality or condition of being impertinent, especially:
  3. (Countable) An instance of this; a moment of being impertinent.
The quality of being offensively bold.
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  1. The quality of being offensively bold.
  2. Impudent speech or behavior
  3. Offensively bold behavior.
A lack of courtesy or politeness; rudeness
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  1. A lack of courtesy or politeness; rudeness
  2. A rude or discourteous act
  3. The quality or condition of being uncivil.
Emotional control; coolness in danger; courage
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  1. Emotional control; coolness in danger; courage
  2. A sore point or sensitive subject:
  3. Any of the cordlike bundles of fibers made up of neurons through which sensory stimuli and motor impulses pass between the brain or other parts of the central nervous system and the eyes, glands, muscles, and other parts of the body. Nerves form a network of pathways for conducting information throughout the body.
The characteristic of being nervy.
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  1. The characteristic of being nervy.
An excessive degree of confidence
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The quality of being pert; cheekiness, impudence.
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The quality of being pushy
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The quality of being sassy.
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The property of being saucy
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  1. The property of being saucy
  2. An instance of saucy behavior
(Music) The section of a band or an orchestra composed of brass instruments.
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  1. (Music) The section of a band or an orchestra composed of brass instruments.
  2. (Uncountable, used as a singular or plural noun, military) High-ranking officers.
  3. (Countable, music) A class of wind instruments, usually made of metal (such as brass), that use vibrations of the player's lips to produce sound.
The solid, outermost layer of the Earth, lying above the mantle. &diamf3; The crust that includes continents is called continental crust and is about 35.4 to 70 km (22 to 43.4 mi) thick. It consists mostly of rocks, such as granites and granodiorites, that are rich in silica and aluminum, with minor amounts of iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, and potassium. &diamf3; The crust that includes ocean floors is called oceanic crust and is about 4.8 to 9.7 km (3 to 6 mi) thick. It has a similar composition to that of continental crust, but has higher concentrations of iron, magnesium, and calcium and is denser than continental crust. The predominant type of rock in oceanic crust is basalt.
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  1. The solid, outermost layer of the Earth, lying above the mantle. &diamf3; The crust that includes continents is called continental crust and is about 35.4 to 70 km (22 to 43.4 mi) thick. It consists mostly of rocks, such as granites and granodiorites, that are rich in silica and aluminum, with minor amounts of iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, and potassium. &diamf3; The crust that includes ocean floors is called oceanic crust and is about 4.8 to 9.7 km (3 to 6 mi) thick. It has a similar composition to that of continental crust, but has higher concentrations of iron, magnesium, and calcium and is denser than continental crust. The predominant type of rock in oceanic crust is basalt.
  2. A hard deposit formed by wine on the inside surface of a bottle
  3. A piece of bread that has become hard and dry.
Stewed fruit, usually served with other foods.
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  1. Stewed fruit, usually served with other foods.
  2. Something that adds interest, zest, or flavor
  3. A liquid or soft mixture served with food to add flavor or enhance its general appeal
The state, or an instance, of being uppish.
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  1. The state, or an instance, of being uppish.
Alternative form of uppitiness.
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To scrape or rub off; wear away by scraping or rubbing
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  1. To scrape or rub off; wear away by scraping or rubbing
  2. To wear down, rub away, or scrape by friction:
  3. To become worn or scraped by abrasion:
To rub (on or against)
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  1. To rub (on or against)
  2. To become worn or sore from rubbing or friction:
  3. To annoy; irritate
To censure strongly; denounce:
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  1. To censure strongly; denounce:
  2. To criticize (something) harshly:
  3. To strip, scratch, or rub off the skin of; flay, abrade, chafe, etc.
To cause to be uneasy; vex:
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  1. To cause to be uneasy; vex:
  2. To irritate; vex; annoy; worry
  3. To ornament with a fret
(Physiology) To cause a physiological response to a stimulus in (a cell, body tissue, or organism).
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  1. (Physiology) To cause a physiological response to a stimulus in (a cell, body tissue, or organism).
  2. To be a cause of impatience or anger.
  3. To cause someone to feel impatient or angry; annoy:
To exasperate; annoy; vex
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  1. To exasperate; annoy; vex
  2. To annoy or exasperate:
  3. To make worse or more troublesome:
To harm by repeated attacks; harry; molest
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  1. To harm by repeated attacks; harry; molest
  2. To be annoying
  3. To cause irritation to (another); make somewhat angry.
To take the time and trouble; concern oneself
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  1. To take the time and trouble; concern oneself
  2. To take the trouble (to do something); concern oneself with (accomplishing something):
  3. (Intransitive) To feel care or anxiety; to make or take trouble; to be troublesome.
To equip (a room or telephone circuit, for example) with a concealed electronic listening device.
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  1. To equip (a room or telephone circuit, for example) with a concealed electronic listening device.
  2. To make (the eyes) bulge or grow large.
  3. An insect, spider, or similar organism. Not in scientific use.
To be or become vexed, irritated, or impatient
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  1. To be or become vexed, irritated, or impatient
  2. To rub so as to stimulate or make warm
  3. To wear away or irritate by rubbing or friction:
To break up the quiet or serenity of; agitate (what is quiet or still)
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  1. To break up the quiet or serenity of; agitate (what is quiet or still)
  2. To intrude on; inconvenience:
  3. To break in on; interrupt
To increase the gravity or intensity of:
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  1. To increase the gravity or intensity of:
  2. (Archaic) To intensify (a feeling, disease, etc.); aggravate
  3. To irritate or annoy very much; make angry; vex
To wear away by gnawing, rubbing, corroding, etc.
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  1. To wear away by gnawing, rubbing, corroding, etc.
  2. To move agitatedly.
  3. To make or form by wearing away
To work for gain or profit; make money:
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  1. To work for gain or profit; make money:
  2. To go and bring
  3. To cause to move or leave:
To be irritating, wearisome, or vexing to.
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  1. To be irritating, wearisome, or vexing to.
  2. To annoy, disgust, irritate, tire out, etc.
(Physiology) To cause a physiological response to a stimulus in (a cell, body tissue, or organism).
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  1. (Physiology) To cause a physiological response to a stimulus in (a cell, body tissue, or organism).
  2. To make sore or inflamed:
  3. To cause someone to feel impatient or angry; annoy:
To sting with or as if with a nettle.
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  1. To sting with or as if with a nettle.
  2. To irritate; annoy; vex
To cause to be annoyed or resentful.
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  1. To cause to be annoyed or resentful.
  2. To make peevish or bad-tempered; annoy
  3. To annoy; vex.
To stir to action or feeling:
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  1. To stir to action or feeling:
  2. To give rise to; bring about:
  3. To bring about deliberately; induce:
  1. Roil
  2. To stir up (liquid); roil.
  3. To anger or irritate.
To turn over (the pages of a book, etc.) rapidly
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  1. To turn over (the pages of a book, etc.) rapidly
  2. To search for something in a container:
  3. To put a ruffle on (a garment, for example).
To cause difficulty or trouble to:
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  1. To cause difficulty or trouble to:
  2. To keep bringing up, going over, or returning to (a matter difficult to solve)
  3. To give trouble to, esp. in a petty or nagging way; disturb, annoy, irritate, etc.
Find another word for gall. In this page you can discover 91 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for gall, like: irk, cynicism, rancor, bitterness, effrontery, insolence, temerity, impertinence, annoy, irritate and bitterness.