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Recover synonyms

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To discover or be able to follow (a trail or scent) after losing it.
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  1. To discover or be able to follow (a trail or scent) after losing it.
  2. To add back (body weight that has been lost).
  3. To have (the use or control of something) restored; get back:
(Intransitive) Return to where one came from.
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  1. (Intransitive) Return to where one came from.
To get back; recover
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  1. To get back; recover
  2. (Comput.) To gain access to (data) that is on a floppy disk, hard drive, etc.
  3. To search for, find, and carry back (killed game or a thrown object). Used of dogs.
To get back; recover or regain:
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  1. To get back; recover or regain:
  2. To make back, as an investment.
  3. (Law) To reduce (the amount of a monetary claim made by a party in a legal action) because of a failure of that party to perform an obligation under the contract or law related to the claim.
To rescue or bring back (a person or people) from error, vice, etc. to ways of living or thinking regarded as right; reform
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  1. To rescue or bring back (a person or people) from error, vice, etc. to ways of living or thinking regarded as right; reform
  2. To retrieve (something lost, taken away, deposited temporarily, etc.); get back into one's possession
  3. To bring into or return to a suitable condition for use, as cultivation or habitation:
To get back; recover, as by paying a fee
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  1. To get back; recover, as by paying a fee
  2. To turn in (coupons, for example) and receive something in exchange.
  3. To turn in (trading stamps or coupons) for a prize, premium, discount, etc.
To save from loss or destruction.
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  1. To save from loss or destruction.
  2. To save or rescue from shipwreck, fire, flood, etc.; engage or succeed in the salvage of (ships, goods, etc.)
  3. To save (discarded or damaged material) for further use.
(Law) To remove (a person or property) from legal custody by force, in violation of the law.
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  1. (Law) To remove (a person or property) from legal custody by force, in violation of the law.
  2. To cause to be free from danger, imprisonment, or difficulty; save.
  3. (Law) To take (a person or thing) out of legal custody by force
To capture again.
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  1. To capture again.
  2. To capture something for a second or subsequent time, especially after a loss
  3. To capture again; retake; get back by capture; reacquire
(Now Rare) To put in possession again
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  1. (Now Rare) To put in possession again
  2. To give back possession to.
  3. To get possession of again; specif., to take back from a buyer who has failed to make payments when due
(Idiomatic) To regain favour (with)
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  1. (Idiomatic) To regain favour (with)
  2. (Idiomatic) to win money that has been lost.
  3. (Idiomatic) To get (someone) to be one's partner, after having been apart.
To discover again or independently of someone who has made a prior discovery.
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  1. To discover again or independently of someone who has made a prior discovery.
To assume, take, or occupy again:
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  1. To assume, take, or occupy again:
  2. To begin again or continue after interruption.
  3. To take, get, or occupy again
(Intransitive) To be brought up to date with news.
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  1. (Intransitive) To be brought up to date with news.
  2. To pick up suddenly.
  3. (Intransitive) To get news
To seize or take back (goods) under a writ of replevin
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  1. To seize or take back (goods) under a writ of replevin
  2. (Rare) To release (a person) on bail
  3. The recovery of goods pursuant to a writ of replevin; to get delivery of goods that had been kept from the rightful owner; to recover chattels as a result of replevin. The recovery of goods pursuant to a writ of replevin; to get delivery of goods that had been kept from the rightful owner; to recover chattels as a result of replevin.
To have a sudden overwhelming effect on:
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  1. To have a sudden overwhelming effect on:
  2. To put in legal possession of a particular thing; assign ownership to
  3. To take quick and forcible possession of; confiscate:
To get by effort or merit, as in competition; win
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  1. To get by effort or merit, as in competition; win
  2. To increase; grow:
  3. To come into possession or use of; acquire:
To multiply; reproduce.
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  1. To multiply; reproduce.
  2. To make greater or larger.
  3. To cause to become greater in size, amount, degree, etc.; add to; augment
To surpass or exceed:
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  1. To surpass or exceed:
  2. (Informal) had better (see phrase below)
  3. To become better
To be sold for, or bring as profit (a specified sum)
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  1. To be sold for, or bring as profit (a specified sum)
  2. To gain; obtain
  3. To obtain or achieve, as gain or profit:
To get in touch with, as by telephone
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  1. To get in touch with, as by telephone
  2. To carry; penetrate, as sight, sound, etc.
  3. To make an effort to address the needs of a group or community. Often used with out:
To increase in size and develop toward maturity, as a plant or animal does by assimilating food
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  1. To increase in size and develop toward maturity, as a plant or animal does by assimilating food
  2. To cause to grow; raise:
  3. To come to be by a gradual process or by degrees; become:
To call for and receive (money) for (rent, a fund, taxes, bills, etc.)
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  1. To call for and receive (money) for (rent, a fund, taxes, bills, etc.)
  2. To call for (someone); pick up:
  3. To come together in a group or mass; gather:
To move forward quickly, or to make good progress with (especially a plan)
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  1. To move forward quickly, or to make good progress with (especially a plan)
To bring forth; exhibit:
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  1. To bring forth; exhibit:
  2. To create by physical or mental effort:
  3. To cause to occur or exist; give rise to:
To come in order to help
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  1. To come in order to help
  2. To come back to action, normal strength, etc.; revive
  3. To come together for a common purpose, esp. to assist or support a cause, person, etc.
(Idiomatic) To recover from illness or other incapacitation.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To recover from illness or other incapacitation.
  2. (Literally) To improve.
To recover losses, etc.
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  1. To recover losses, etc.
  2. To be restored to health, strength, etc.; get well again; recover
  3. To recover from financial loss.
(Now Rare) To use profitably or to good advantage
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  1. (Now Rare) To use profitably or to good advantage
  2. To raise to a more desirable or more excellent quality or condition; make better:
  3. To become better:
To recover gradually from illness; regain strength and health
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  1. To recover gradually from illness; regain strength and health
To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved.
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  1. To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved.
  2. To help, to advance, to further; to add to.
  3. To get better; improve, esp. in health
To become well or healthy again; be cured
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  1. To become well or healthy again; be cured
  2. To cure or get rid of (a disease)
  3. To cause (a wound, sore, etc.) to become closed or scarred so as to restore a healthy condition
  1. To regain consciousness after a faint etc.
  2. (Idiomatic) To change one's mind, especially to begin to agree or appreciate what one was reluctant to accept at first.
(Intransitive) To return to a place.
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  1. (Intransitive) To return to a place.
(Idiomatic) To trick or con.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To trick or con.
  2. (Idiomatic) To gain an advantage over.
  3. (Idiomatic) To overwhelm or overcome
To deal with successfully; prevail over; surmount:
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  1. To deal with successfully; prevail over; surmount:
  2. To get the better of in competition, struggle, etc.; conquer
  3. To overpower, as with emotion; affect deeply:
To join by or fit into a gain.
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  1. To join by or fit into a gain.
  2. To obtain a profit or advantage; benefit:
  3. To obtain through effort or merit; achieve:
To come or bring back to a healthy, vigorous, or flourishing condition after a decline
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  1. To come or bring back to a healthy, vigorous, or flourishing condition after a decline
  2. To regain health, vigor, or good spirits:
  3. To restore to use, currency, activity, or notice:
To retrieve, to have an item returned.
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To clean the barrel of a firearm using a pull through
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  1. To clean the barrel of a firearm using a pull through
  2. To come through pain and trouble through perseverance
(Idiomatic) To go back to a better, original state.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To go back to a better, original state.
(Law) To reduce (the amount of a monetary claim made by a party in a legal action) because of a failure of that party to perform an obligation under the contract or law related to the claim.
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  1. (Law) To reduce (the amount of a monetary claim made by a party in a legal action) because of a failure of that party to perform an obligation under the contract or law related to the claim.
  2. To restore; replenish:
  3. To recover from an error.
To manage to reach again:
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  1. To manage to reach again:
  2. To recover possession of (something lost or taken away); get back:
  3. To have the use of (a faculty, ability, or desirable condition) restored; be restored to (a normal or desirable condition):
(Now Rare) To put in possession again
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  1. (Now Rare) To put in possession again
  2. To give back possession to.
  3. To get possession of again; specif., to take back from a buyer who has failed to make payments when due
To find and bring back game or a thrown object:
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  1. To find and bring back game or a thrown object:
  2. To get back; recover
  3. (Comput.) To gain access to (data) that is on a floppy disk, hard drive, etc.
To bring into or return to a suitable condition for use, as cultivation or habitation:
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  1. To bring into or return to a suitable condition for use, as cultivation or habitation:
  2. To demand the restoration or return of (a possession, for example); claim again or back:
  3. To rescue or bring back (a person or people) from error, vice, etc. to ways of living or thinking regarded as right; reform
To turn in (trading stamps or coupons) for a prize, premium, discount, etc.
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  1. To turn in (trading stamps or coupons) for a prize, premium, discount, etc.
  2. To turn in (coupons, for example) and receive something in exchange.
  3. To get back; recover, as by paying a fee
To cause to be free from danger, imprisonment, or difficulty; save.
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  1. To cause to be free from danger, imprisonment, or difficulty; save.
  2. (Law) To remove (a person or property) from legal custody by force, in violation of the law.
  3. (Law) To take (a person or thing) out of legal custody by force
To save from loss or destruction.
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  1. To save from loss or destruction.
  2. To save or rescue from shipwreck, fire, flood, etc.; engage or succeed in the salvage of (ships, goods, etc.)
  3. To save (discarded or damaged material) for further use.
  1. To regain consciousness after a faint etc.
  2. (Idiomatic) To change one's mind, especially to begin to agree or appreciate what one was reluctant to accept at first.
To recover gradually from illness; regain strength and health
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  1. To recover gradually from illness; regain strength and health
To join by or fit into a gain.
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  1. To join by or fit into a gain.
  2. To obtain a profit or advantage; benefit:
  3. To obtain through effort or merit; achieve:
(Now Rare) To use profitably or to good advantage
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  1. (Now Rare) To use profitably or to good advantage
  2. To raise to a more desirable or more excellent quality or condition; make better:
  3. To become better:
To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved.
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  1. To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved.
  2. To help, to advance, to further; to add to.
  3. To get better; improve, esp. in health
To come in order to help
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  1. To come in order to help
  2. To come back to action, normal strength, etc.; revive
  3. To come together for a common purpose, esp. to assist or support a cause, person, etc.
To recover losses, etc.
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  1. To recover losses, etc.
  2. To be restored to health, strength, etc.; get well again; recover
  3. To recover from financial loss.

Synonym Study

  • Reclaim implies recovery or restoration to a better or useful state to reclaim wasteland
  • Recoup implies recovery of an equivalent in compensation I tried to recoup my losses
  • Retrieve suggests diligent effort in regaining something that is beyond each reach he was determined to retrieve his honor
  • Regain more strongly stresses a deliberate winning back of something that has been lost or taken from one to regain confidence, to regain a military objective
  • Recover implies finding or getting back something that one has lost in any manner to recover stolen property, to recover one's self-possession
Find another word for recover. In this page you can discover 101 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for recover, like: replevin, regain, get-back, retrieve, recoup, reclaim, redeem, salvage, rescue, find again and recapture.