Tap synonyms

tăp
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Part of speech:
A light gentle stroke or tap.
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To draw off by degrees; to cause to flow gradually out or off; hence, to exhaust.
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Empty is defined as to remove all of something.
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To draw or bind together the edges of:
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To close or fasten with a seal:
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Third-person singular simple present indicative form of sound
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Strike is a term used in baseball for a pitched ball that is counted against the batter.
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A small valve, spout, or faucet operated by hand, usually used to release pressure or drain fluid. [from 19th c.]
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A gate regulating the flow of water in a sluice, channel, etc.
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A stream, jet, or discharge of or as of liquid from a spout
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A small piece of material affixed to another, larger piece to conceal, reinforce, or repair a worn area, hole, or tear.
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The definition of a guard is a person or device that protects.
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The definition of a cover is something that goes over, rests on the surface or provides a place to hide.
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(Psychology) The occurrence or experimental introduction of an unconditioned stimulus along with a conditioned stimulus.
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To touch a person or thing
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(Slang) To discuss something freely and at length.
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To pass into or through something.
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To form or enlarge (something) by means of a boring instrument or apparatus.
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To create (a hole) by removing material with a drill (tool).
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To be overcome or submerged by a wave or surge of water.
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To plunge (a pointed weapon or instrument) into something.
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Spear is defined as to throw or stab with a long pointed instrument.
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To fill or spread throughout; to pervade.
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To fasten or fit with or as with a spike or spikes
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To pierce with a lance, or with any similar weapon.
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To bring about deliberately; provoke:
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To extract, bring out, as concealed information; elicit; educe.
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To obtain by means of tapping
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To distribute or spread (something), as if it were a liquid.
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To join or unite:
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The act of striking or hitting.
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The definition of a faucet is a device that controls the flow of liquid.
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To attack:
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To penetrate is to pass into or through something.
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To strike a sharp audible blow or series of blows, as on a door.
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To name or select officially for an office, position, etc.
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To give a name or title to; characterize:
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(Second object is a verb, can be stressed for emphasis or clarity) To force to do.
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To give a name or title to; entitle; style
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To name someone as a candidate for a particular role or position, including that of an office.
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To remove water, etc. from, as with a pump
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To install an electronic listening device or devices in.
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The act of placing an electronic device to listen in on oral communications. See also bugging, and pen register.
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To select for an office or position
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To cause to become greater in size, amount, degree, etc.; add to; augment
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(Intransitive) To conduct an inquiry or examination.
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The motion or slapping sound of a swinging flap
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A popular hackerdom newsletter meaning “Technical Assistance Program.” Before the 1970s, it was known as “The Youth International Party Line.” The publishing partner of Yippie guru Abbie Hoffman—Al Bell—changed the name of the newsletter to TAP—The Hobbyists Newsletter for the Communications Revolution. The newsletter was published in New York City from 1971 until 1984. The premise behind the publication was that phreaking did not hurt anyone because telephone calls emanated from an unlimited reservoir. During the reign of the newsletter, which is no longer in circulation, hackers hoarded the mind-numbingly complex articles on such topics as explosives formulas, electronic sabotage blueprints, and credit card fraud. It was in TAP that peculiar forms of computer underground spelling were implemented, such as substituting “z” for “s,” 0 (zero) for O (the letter) and spelling the word “freak” as “phreak.” The eccentricities introduced decades ago remain in the hacker community today. A popular hackerdom newsletter meaning “Technical Assistance Program.” Before the 1970s, it was known as “The Youth International Party Line.” The publishing partner of Yippie guru Abbie Hoffman—Al Bell—changed the name of the newsletter to TAP—The Hobbyists Newsletter for the Communications Revolution. The newsletter was published in New York City from 1971 until 1984. The premise behind the publication was that phreaking did not hurt anyone because telephone calls emanated from an unlimited reservoir. During the reign of the newsletter, which is no longer in circulation, hackers hoarded the mind-numbingly complex articles on such topics as explosives formulas, electronic sabotage blueprints, and credit card fraud. It was in TAP that peculiar forms of computer underground spelling were implemented, such as substituting “z” for “s,” 0 (zero) for O (the letter) and spelling the word “freak” as “phreak.” The eccentricities introduced decades ago remain in the hacker community today. Hacker Cheshire Catalyst (a.k.a. Richard Cheshire) was the last editor of TAP. Cheshire says that the title was changed to “Technological Assistance Program” from its original “Technological American Party (TAP)” when the editorial team found it difficult to open a bank account without being a bona fide political party. Schell, B.H., Dodge, J.L., with S.S. Moutsatsos. The Hacking of America: Who’s Doing It, Why, and How. Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 2002; The Cheshire Catalyst Home Page. The TAP Newsletter Page. [Online, February 4, 1996.] Cheshire Catalyst’s Website. http://cheshire catalyst.com/tap.html.
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A popular hackerdom newsletter meaning “Technical Assistance Program.” Before the 1970s, it was known as “The Youth International Party Line.” The publishing partner of Yippie guru Abbie Hoffman—Al Bell—changed the name of the newsletter to TAP—The Hobbyists Newsletter for the Communications Revolution. The newsletter was published in New York City from 1971 until 1984. The premise behind the publication was that phreaking did not hurt anyone because telephone calls emanated from an unlimited reservoir. During the reign of the newsletter, which is no longer in circulation, hackers hoarded the mind-numbingly complex articles on such topics as explosives formulas, electronic sabotage blueprints, and credit card fraud. It was in TAP that peculiar forms of computer underground spelling were implemented, such as substituting “z” for “s,” 0 (zero) for O (the letter) and spelling the word “freak” as “phreak.” The eccentricities introduced decades ago remain in the hacker community today. A popular hackerdom newsletter meaning “Technical Assistance Program.” Before the 1970s, it was known as “The Youth International Party Line.” The publishing partner of Yippie guru Abbie Hoffman—Al Bell—changed the name of the newsletter to TAP—The Hobbyists Newsletter for the Communications Revolution. The newsletter was published in New York City from 1971 until 1984. The premise behind the publication was that phreaking did not hurt anyone because telephone calls emanated from an unlimited reservoir. During the reign of the newsletter, which is no longer in circulation, hackers hoarded the mind-numbingly complex articles on such topics as explosives formulas, electronic sabotage blueprints, and credit card fraud. It was in TAP that peculiar forms of computer underground spelling were implemented, such as substituting “z” for “s,” 0 (zero) for O (the letter) and spelling the word “freak” as “phreak.” The eccentricities introduced decades ago remain in the hacker community today. Hacker Cheshire Catalyst (a.k.a. Richard Cheshire) was the last editor of TAP. Cheshire says that the title was changed to “Technological Assistance Program” from its original “Technological American Party (TAP)” when the editorial team found it difficult to open a bank account without being a bona fide political party. Schell, B.H., Dodge, J.L., with S.S. Moutsatsos. The Hacking of America: Who’s Doing It, Why, and How. Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 2002; The Cheshire Catalyst Home Page. The TAP Newsletter Page. [Online, February 4, 1996.] Cheshire Catalyst’s Website. http://cheshire catalyst.com/tap.html.
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Present participle of phreak.
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A plug used to stop the hole in a barrel
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a faucet for drawing water from a pipe or cask
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A spout connected to a socket to provide water from the main water supply.
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(Dial.) A faucet
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To persuade or incite one to commit some act, especially illegal or sexual behavior.
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To ask (permission) to do something:
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To use for one’s own advantage.
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To serve as the tip of
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dance and make rhythmic clicking sounds by means of metal plates nailed to the sole of the dance shoes
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To decorate a piece of clothing or fabric by adding holes or by scalloping the fringe.
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To stop, deflect, or interrupt the progress or intended course of:
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A dab hand.
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Find another word for tap. In this page you can discover 64 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for tap, like: pat, drain, empty, close, seal, sounds, strike, petcock, valve, spout and patch.