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Discard synonyms

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To drive out; to expel.
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To turn down (an applicant, as for a job); refuse to accept.
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  1. To turn down (an applicant, as for a job); refuse to accept.
  2. To refuse to take, agree to, accede to, use, believe, etc.
  3. To pass over or skip from (a record set by a record changer) without playing
To discard (trash, garbage, or the like), to toss out, to put in the trash, to dispose of.
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  1. To discard (trash, garbage, or the like), to toss out, to put in the trash, to dispose of.
To arrange in an orderly way.
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  1. To arrange in an orderly way.
  2. To deal with conclusively with a threat or a difficult situation.
  3. To get rid of.
(Idiomatic) To offer an idea for consideration.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To offer an idea for consideration.
  2. (Idiomatic) To discard; to dispense with something; to throw away.
  3. (Idiomatic) To dismiss or expel someone from any longer performing duty or attending somewhere.
To force or drive out:
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  1. To force or drive out:
  2. To remove from membership.
  3. To dismiss or send away by authority; deprive of rights, membership, etc.
To refuse to accept or support; deny the validity or authority of (a belief, a treaty, etc.)
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  1. To refuse to accept or support; deny the validity or authority of (a belief, a treaty, etc.)
  2. To deny the truth of (a charge, etc.)
  3. To disown (a child, for example).
To surrender one's claim to, right to, or interest in; give up entirely:
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  1. To surrender one's claim to, right to, or interest in; give up entirely:
  2. To intentionally give up for all time an assertion or a claim of an interest in property or in a right or privilege.
  3. To give up by leaving or ceasing to operate or inhabit, especially as a result of danger or other impending threat:
To save money.
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  1. To save money.
  2. To run a ship aground intentionally to avoid a collision
  3. To perform an action without attracting attention.
To separate from surrounding living tissue. Used of dead tissue.
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  1. To separate from surrounding living tissue. Used of dead tissue.
  2. To be shed, cast off, or discarded; come off
  3. To cast off or shed (skin or a covering):
To give up (a claim, right, belief, etc.), usually by a formal public statement
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  1. To give up (a claim, right, belief, etc.), usually by a formal public statement
  2. To give up (a title or possession, for example), especially by formal announcement.
  3. To decide or declare that one will no longer engage in (a practice) or use (something):
To remove or cause to be removed so as to make way for another; supplant
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  1. To remove or cause to be removed so as to make way for another; supplant
  2. To take the place of (a person), as in an office or position; succeed.
  3. To cause to be set aside or dropped from use as inferior or obsolete and replaced by something else
To take apart; disassemble; tear down.
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  1. To take apart; disassemble; tear down.
  2. To put an end to in a gradual systematic way:
  3. To strip (a house, ship, etc.) of furniture, equipment, means of defense, etc.
(Electricity) To cause the release of stored energy or electric charge from (a battery, for example).
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  1. (Electricity) To cause the release of stored energy or electric charge from (a battery, for example).
  2. To release, emit, or excrete a substance, especially from the body.
  3. To become blurred, as a color or dye; run.
(Accounting) To reduce an asset's book value to zero
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  1. (Accounting) To reduce an asset's book value to zero
  2. (Accounting) To remove a portion of a debt or an amount of an account owed to you counting it as a loss (as a gesture of goodwill for example)
  3. Figuratively, to assign a low value to something.
To drive away; expel:
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  1. To drive away; expel:
  2. To send or put away; get rid of
  3. To force to leave a country or place by official decree; exile:
To be ejected from an aircraft as by means of an ejection seat
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  1. To be ejected from an aircraft as by means of an ejection seat
  2. (Sports) To disqualify or force (a player or coach) to leave the playing area for the remainder of a game.
  3. To compel to leave:
(Law) To adjudicate (a cause of action) as insufficient to proceed further in court because of some deficiency in law or fact.
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  1. (Law) To adjudicate (a cause of action) as insufficient to proceed further in court because of some deficiency in law or fact.
  2. To direct or allow to leave:
  3. To send away; cause or allow to leave
To get a divorce
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  1. To get a divorce
  2. To end marriage with (one's spouse) by way of legal divorce.
  3. To terminate a marriage to someone by obtaining a court order, usually referred to as a divorce decree.
To deprive of the possession of something, esp. land, a house, etc.; oust
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  1. To deprive of the possession of something, esp. land, a house, etc.; oust
  2. To deprive (another) of the possession or occupancy of something, such as real property.
  3. To deprive someone of the possession of land, especially by evicting them.
To empty (material) out of a container or vehicle:
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  1. To empty (material) out of a container or vehicle:
  2. To get rid of; discard:
  3. (Computers) To transfer (data stored internally in a computer) from one place to another, as from a memory to a printout, without processing.
(Idiomatic) To refuse (not accept); forgo.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To refuse (not accept); forgo.
  2. Used other than as an idiom: see pass,‎ up.
To willingly let go of; to give up; to relinquish.
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(Intransitive) to depart in single file
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  1. (Intransitive) to depart in single file
  2. To remove using a file (the tool)
To get rid of (something unwanted)
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  1. To get rid of (something unwanted)
  2. To cause to flow in a stream or fall in drops
  3. To have (a growth or covering) be disconnected or fall off by a natural process:
To renounce under oath; forswear.
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  1. To renounce under oath; forswear.
  2. To recant solemnly; renounce or repudiate:
  3. To give up (rights, allegiance, etc.) under oath; renounce
To discard (something) as useless or a burden
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  1. To discard (something) as useless or a burden
  2. (Informal) To discard (something) as unwanted or burdensome:
  3. To let go or get rid of as being useless or defective; discard.
To let go (a grasp, hold, etc.)
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  1. To let go (a grasp, hold, etc.)
  2. To give up; abandon (a plan, policy, etc.)
  3. To give up or abandon (control of something or a claim, for example).
The annullment of an existing law by the enactment of a new law. If the new law declares the old law to be revoked, the repeal is express. If the new law has provisions that contradict the old law so that both cannot logically exist together, the new law takes precedence and the repeal is implied. The annullment of an existing law by the enactment of a new law. If the new law declares the old law to be revoked, the repeal is express. If the new law has provisions that contradict the old law so that both cannot logically exist together, the new law takes precedence and the repeal is implied. The act of annulling a law.
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  1. The annullment of an existing law by the enactment of a new law. If the new law declares the old law to be revoked, the repeal is express. If the new law has provisions that contradict the old law so that both cannot logically exist together, the new law takes precedence and the repeal is implied. The annullment of an existing law by the enactment of a new law. If the new law declares the old law to be revoked, the repeal is express. If the new law has provisions that contradict the old law so that both cannot logically exist together, the new law takes precedence and the repeal is implied. The act of annulling a law.
  2. To revoke or rescind, especially by the action of a legislature.
  3. (Obsolete) To summon back or recall, especially from exile.
(Informal) To eat up quickly
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  1. (Informal) To eat up quickly
  2. To finish quickly or promptly
  3. To send off or out promptly, usually on a specific errand or official business
To remove something using a scooping movement.
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  1. To remove something using a scooping movement.
To blot out, deface, mark off, perforate, destroy, or otherwise physically alter a writing to render it void.
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  1. To blot out, deface, mark off, perforate, destroy, or otherwise physically alter a writing to render it void.
  2. To cross out with lines or other marks, as in deleting written matter or marking a check as used and cleared
  3. (Math.) To remove (a common factor from both terms of a fraction, equivalents of opposite sign or on opposite sides of an equation, etc.)
To give up; renounce (a habit, idea, etc.)
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  1. To give up; renounce (a habit, idea, etc.)
  2. To leave altogether; abandon:
  3. To give up (something formerly held dear); renounce:
To withdraw from, especially in spite of a responsibility or duty; forsake:
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  1. To withdraw from, especially in spite of a responsibility or duty; forsake:
  2. To forsake one's duty or post, especially to be absent without leave from the armed forces with no intention of returning.
  3. A large, dry, barren region, usually having sandy or rocky soil and little or no vegetation. Water lost to evaporation and transpiration in a desert exceeds the amount of precipitation; most deserts average less than 25 cm (9.75 inches) of precipitation each year, concentrated in short local bursts. Deserts cover about one fifth of the Earth's surface, with the principal warm deserts located mainly along the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn, where warm, rising equatorial air masses that have already lost most of their moisture descend over the subtropical regions. Cool deserts are located at higher elevations in the temperate regions, often on the lee side of a barrier mountain range where the prevailing winds drop their moisture before crossing the range.
To form or shape by severing or incising:
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  1. To form or shape by severing or incising:
  2. To go directly and often hastily:
  3. To perform:
(Idiomatic) To defeat with ease.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To defeat with ease.
  2. (Idiomatic) To disregard, dismiss or ignore something, as unimportant.
To wound without killing; maim
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  1. To wound without killing; maim
  2. To block (a wheel, for example) with a prop to prevent rolling or slipping.
  3. To cut; scratch; score; notch
(Slang) To discard; get rid of
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  1. (Slang) To discard; get rid of
  2. To throw with a quick, short movement; pitch; toss
  3. (Informal) To give up; quit:
To let fall by releasing hold of:
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  1. To let fall by releasing hold of:
  2. To pass into a specified state, esp. into a less active or less desirable one
  3. To cut out; remove; omit
To drive (a vehicle) into a long narrow trench, as one beside a road.
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  1. To drive (a vehicle) into a long narrow trench, as one beside a road.
  2. To cause (a car, wagon, etc.) to go into a ditch
  3. To get away from (a person, especially a companion).
To discard as useless or sell to be reused as parts; scrap.
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  1. To discard as useless or sell to be reused as parts; scrap.
  2. (Informal) To throw away as worthless or get rid of by selling as junk; discard; scrap
To fight or quarrel
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  1. To fight or quarrel
  2. To get rid of or abandon as useless; discard; junk
  3. To fight, usually with the fists.
(US, idiomatic) to get rid of something unwanted
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  1. (US, idiomatic) to get rid of something unwanted
  2. (US, idiomatic) to throw something overboard from a ship
  3. To toss out; get rid of:
(Colloquial) To cancel an order for food.
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  1. (Colloquial) To cancel an order for food.
  2. (Colloquial) To throw out; discard.
  3. To cut off, eject, cancel, eliminate, kill, etc.
To deal with conclusively with a threat or a difficult situation.
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  1. To deal with conclusively with a threat or a difficult situation.
  2. To arrange in an orderly way.
  3. To get rid of.
(Computers) To transfer (data stored internally in a computer) from one place to another, as from a memory to a printout, without processing.
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  1. (Computers) To transfer (data stored internally in a computer) from one place to another, as from a memory to a printout, without processing.
  2. To empty out (a container or vehicle), as by overturning or tilting.
  3. To empty (material) out of a container or vehicle:
To discard as useless or sell to be reused as parts; scrap.
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  1. To discard as useless or sell to be reused as parts; scrap.
  2. (Informal) To throw away as worthless or get rid of by selling as junk; discard; scrap
To fight or quarrel
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  1. To fight or quarrel
  2. To get rid of or abandon as useless; discard; junk
  3. To fight, usually with the fists.
(Figuratively) To waste, to squander.
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(Idiomatic) To offer an idea for consideration.
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  1. (Idiomatic) To offer an idea for consideration.
  2. (Idiomatic) To discard; to dispense with something; to throw away.
  3. (Idiomatic) To dismiss or expel someone from any longer performing duty or attending somewhere.
(Slang) To discard; get rid of
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  1. (Slang) To discard; get rid of
  2. (Informal) To give up; quit:
  3. To throw or toss:
To cast overboard or off:
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  1. To cast overboard or off:
  2. (Informal) To discard (something) as unwanted or burdensome:
  3. To let go or get rid of as being useless or defective; discard.
(Slang) To fool or hoax
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  1. (Slang) To fool or hoax
  2. (Slang) To fool or deceive, often in a playful way
  3. To remove like a shuck
To get away from (a person, especially a companion).
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  1. To get away from (a person, especially a companion).
  2. To discontinue use of or association with:
  3. To dig a ditch.
Find another word for discard. In this page you can discover 96 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for discard, like: cast out, reject, throw away, get-rid-of, dispose of, throw out, expel, repudiate, abandon, cast-aside and cast away.