Banner synonyms

băn'ər
Category:
Part of speech:
The definition of excellent is someone or something as exceptional or of high quality.
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First in importance, degree, or rank.
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(predicative) (Ireland, colloquial) Excellent; superb; deserving of high praise.
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(Nautical) A thin cloth of woven wool from which flags are made; it is light enough to spread in a gentle wind but resistant to fraying in a strong wind.
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Of or having to do with the Top 40 or the kind of popular music they represent
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Imposing by reason of showiness or grandeur; magnificent:
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Extremely fine; excellent
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Of great value or excellence; extraordinary.
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The definition of a standard is something established as a rule, example or basis of comparison.
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A distinctive badge, design, or device:
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(Nautical) A carved ornament on the stern of a vessel, containing a window or the representation of one.
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A representation of a ribbon or scroll bearing an inscription.
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(U.S. Navy) A commissioned officer of the lowest rank, ranking just below a lieutenant junior grade
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(Obsolete) A copy of a book or writing.
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any distinctive flag
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A standard or ensign, consisting of a pole with a crosspiece from which a banner is suspended, especially as used in church processions, but also for civic and military display.
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An important or sensational piece of news.
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A system of gearing driven by a horse power, for multiplying speed.
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The outer margin of the opening of a gastropod shell.
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A covering or being covered with lead
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(UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, colloquial, slang) A cool, nice or helpful person, especially one who is male.
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(Heraldry) A sentence, phrase, or word, forming part of an heraldic achievement.
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any distinctive flag
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The red or orange-red flag of the Abbey of Saint Denis in France, used as a standard by the early kings of France.
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The definition of a pavilion is a large tent or a large, separate part of a building that is often outside, or the lower part of a cut gemstone from the bottom point slanting upward to the girdle, the widest point of the gemstone.
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A long, narrow, triangular or swallow-tailed flag borne on a lance as an ensign, as formerly by knights and lancers
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any distinctive flag
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A salient angle, part, etc.
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An on-off light, semaphore, or other device used to give an indication to another person.
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A stream or column of light shooting upward from the horizon, constituting one of the forms of the aurora borealis.
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any distinctive flag
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(Psychology) An object or image that an individual unconsciously uses to represent repressed thoughts, feelings, or impulses:
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A company of soldiers serving under one standard
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(Military, historical) A proposed but unadopted senior commissioned rank of the Royal Air Force equivalent to group captain.
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(Informal) First-rate; expert
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Designating or of a panel made up of persons specially selected as for their expertise
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(Archaic) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.
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First-rate; excellent
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Of superior quality.
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The definition of first-class is of the highest or best.
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Foremost in quality, rank, or importance.
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Having a high degree of excellence:
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Excellent; first-rate:
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(Informal) First-class; first-rate; superior
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Excellent; splendid:
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Almost first rate.
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Extensive in time or distance:
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Excellent; wonderful:
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First-rate; excellent.
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Exceptionally good of its kind
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First-rate; topnotch.
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Exceptionally good of its kind
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(Sports) A player who is available to replace another if the need arises, and who may or may not actually do so.
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Able to pay or contribute:
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Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): For this reason, many security experts recommend—and, in fact, doing so is required in some jurisdictions—displaying a banner “warning off” all unauthorized users. This warning also serves the purpose of avoiding a limitation imposed on system administrators through the U.S. Federal Wiretap Act. Communication on a network may not be monitored by anybody if the initiator can claim a reasonable expectation of privacy. System administrators therefore set up the banners for their services to state that access to their services will be monitored. Moreover, it is recommended to system administrators that all version information be suppressed in the banners. Some system administrators alter banners to purposely disinform an attacker so as to put an attacker on a wild goose chase. A perfect example is making Microsoft’s IIS Web server advertise itself as something else, such as a checkpoint server on a Solaris UNIX machine. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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One who administers, especially one who works as a manager in a business, government agency, or school.
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Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): For this reason, many security experts recommend—and, in fact, doing so is required in some jurisdictions—displaying a banner “warning off” all unauthorized users. This warning also serves the purpose of avoiding a limitation imposed on system administrators through the U.S. Federal Wiretap Act. Communication on a network may not be monitored by anybody if the initiator can claim a reasonable expectation of privacy. System administrators therefore set up the banners for their services to state that access to their services will be monitored. Moreover, it is recommended to system administrators that all version information be suppressed in the banners. Some system administrators alter banners to purposely disinform an attacker so as to put an attacker on a wild goose chase. A perfect example is making Microsoft’s IIS Web server advertise itself as something else, such as a checkpoint server on a Solaris UNIX machine. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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Middle Finger - This finger is called the bird finger, the long finger and "The Finger." Its anatomical name is the 3rd finger, digitus tertius, digitus III or digitus medius (because it’s in the middle). Palm readers know it as the 2nd finger or the Saturn finger.
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Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): For this reason, many security experts recommend—and, in fact, doing so is required in some jurisdictions—displaying a banner “warning off” all unauthorized users. This warning also serves the purpose of avoiding a limitation imposed on system administrators through the U.S. Federal Wiretap Act. Communication on a network may not be monitored by anybody if the initiator can claim a reasonable expectation of privacy. System administrators therefore set up the banners for their services to state that access to their services will be monitored. Moreover, it is recommended to system administrators that all version information be suppressed in the banners. Some system administrators alter banners to purposely disinform an attacker so as to put an attacker on a wild goose chase. A perfect example is making Microsoft’s IIS Web server advertise itself as something else, such as a checkpoint server on a Solaris UNIX machine. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): For this reason, many security experts recommend—and, in fact, doing so is required in some jurisdictions—displaying a banner “warning off” all unauthorized users. This warning also serves the purpose of avoiding a limitation imposed on system administrators through the U.S. Federal Wiretap Act. Communication on a network may not be monitored by anybody if the initiator can claim a reasonable expectation of privacy. System administrators therefore set up the banners for their services to state that access to their services will be monitored. Moreover, it is recommended to system administrators that all version information be suppressed in the banners. Some system administrators alter banners to purposely disinform an attacker so as to put an attacker on a wild goose chase. A perfect example is making Microsoft’s IIS Web server advertise itself as something else, such as a checkpoint server on a Solaris UNIX machine. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): For this reason, many security experts recommend—and, in fact, doing so is required in some jurisdictions—displaying a banner “warning off” all unauthorized users. This warning also serves the purpose of avoiding a limitation imposed on system administrators through the U.S. Federal Wiretap Act. Communication on a network may not be monitored by anybody if the initiator can claim a reasonable expectation of privacy. System administrators therefore set up the banners for their services to state that access to their services will be monitored. Moreover, it is recommended to system administrators that all version information be suppressed in the banners. Some system administrators alter banners to purposely disinform an attacker so as to put an attacker on a wild goose chase. A perfect example is making Microsoft’s IIS Web server advertise itself as something else, such as a checkpoint server on a Solaris UNIX machine. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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To draw up a protocol
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Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): For this reason, many security experts recommend—and, in fact, doing so is required in some jurisdictions—displaying a banner “warning off” all unauthorized users. This warning also serves the purpose of avoiding a limitation imposed on system administrators through the U.S. Federal Wiretap Act. Communication on a network may not be monitored by anybody if the initiator can claim a reasonable expectation of privacy. System administrators therefore set up the banners for their services to state that access to their services will be monitored. Moreover, it is recommended to system administrators that all version information be suppressed in the banners. Some system administrators alter banners to purposely disinform an attacker so as to put an attacker on a wild goose chase. A perfect example is making Microsoft’s IIS Web server advertise itself as something else, such as a checkpoint server on a Solaris UNIX machine. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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To use ssh to connect to a remote computer.
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Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): For this reason, many security experts recommend—and, in fact, doing so is required in some jurisdictions—displaying a banner “warning off” all unauthorized users. This warning also serves the purpose of avoiding a limitation imposed on system administrators through the U.S. Federal Wiretap Act. Communication on a network may not be monitored by anybody if the initiator can claim a reasonable expectation of privacy. System administrators therefore set up the banners for their services to state that access to their services will be monitored. Moreover, it is recommended to system administrators that all version information be suppressed in the banners. Some system administrators alter banners to purposely disinform an attacker so as to put an attacker on a wild goose chase. A perfect example is making Microsoft’s IIS Web server advertise itself as something else, such as a checkpoint server on a Solaris UNIX machine. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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The national flag of Denmark, featuring a white Nordic cross atop a red background; is said to be the oldest existing flag in the world, dating back to the 13th century.
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A long whip used by the driver of a horse-drawn coach.
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Alternative form of gonfalon.
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Plural form of color
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(Sports) A flag that symbolizes the championship of a league, especially a professional baseball league.
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The definition of color is a component of light which is separated when it is reflected off of an object.
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(Colloquial) Frighteningly good.
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Find another word for banner. In this page you can discover 75 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for banner, like: excellent, prime, champion, bunting, top, splendid, superb, superior, standard, emblem and flag.