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Another word for lurch

a-z
Verb
  1. To walk unsteadily

      1. To tremble or quaver:
      2. To waver or vacillate in one's opinions or feelings.
      3. To waver in one's opinions, etc.; vacillate
      1. To twist or interlace (something) into, through, or among
      2. To interlace (threads, for example) into cloth.
      3. To construct by interlacing or interweaving strips or strands of material:
      1. To be on the point of failure or collapse
      2. To proceed with feeble, unsure steps
      3. To rock or shake as if about to fall; be unsteady
      1. To alternate, as between opposing attitudes or positions; vacillate.
      2. To move or sway unsteadily or unsurely; totter.
      3. To totter, wobble, waver, etc.
      1. To come by chance; happen
      2. (Intransitive) To trip or fall; to walk clumsily.
      3. To strike or happen (upon a person or thing) without design; to fall or light by chance; with on, upon, or against.
      1. To arrange (periods of activity, duties, etc.) so as to avoid crowding, provide for continuity of expertise, etc.
      2. To arrange (the wings of a biplane) so that the leading edge of one wing is either ahead of or behind the leading edge of the other wing.
      3. (Sports) To arrange (the start of a race) with the starting point in the outside lanes progressively closer to the finish line so as to neutralize the advantage of competing in the shorter inside lanes.
      1. To feel dizzy; have a sensation of spinning or whirling
      2. To be thrown off balance or fall back:
      3. To feel dizzy:
      1. To become weak, ineffective, or unsteady, especially in performance:
      2. To move uncertainly or unsteadily; totter; stumble
      3. To act hesitantly; show uncertainty; waver; flinch
    See also:

    move

  2. To lean suddenly, unsteadily, and erratically from the vertical axis

      1. (Nautical) To swerve off course momentarily or temporarily:
      2. To move unsteadily; weave.
      3. (Intransitive, nautical) To steer badly, zigzagging back and forth across the intended course of a boat; to go out of the line of course.
      1. To cause to move backward and forward in seesaw fashion.
      2. To move on or as on a seesaw
      3. To change back and forth from one condition or situation to another:
      1. To spread, compress, or flatten by applying pressure with a roller:
      2. To envelop or enfold in a covering:
      3. To cause to begin moving or operating:
      1. To assign as pitcher:
      2. To assign (a player) to pitch
      3. To erect or establish; set up:
    See also:

    straight

    move

  3. To move or cause to move with a sudden abrupt motion

      1. To pull with a quick, strong movement; jerk:
      2. To pull on something suddenly.
      3. To jerk
      1. To turn using a wrench:
      2. To give a twist, turn, or pull:
      3. To twist, pull, or jerk suddenly and violently
      1. To ache with a sudden, sharp pain
      2. To draw, pull, or move suddenly and sharply; jerk:
      3. To move with a quick, slight jerk or jerks or spasmodically
      1. To open, close, or fit together with a click:
      2. To pull apart or break with a snapping sound.
      3. With, or as with, a snap
      1. To give a sudden quick thrust, push, pull, or twist to.
      2. To pull, twist, push, thrust, or throw with a sudden, sharp movement
      3. To move with a jerk or in jerks
    See also:

    push

    move

Noun
  1. A sudden motion, such as a pull

      1. (Slang) A Yankee; esp., a U.S. soldier in World Wars I and II
      2. A sudden, strong pull; jerk
      3. A sudden vigorous pull; a jerk.
      1. A distortion in the original form or meaning of something written or spoken; a twisted interpretation.
      2. Any of various hand or power tools, often having fixed or adjustable jaws, used for gripping, turning, or twisting objects such as nuts, bolts, or pipes, typically at an angle perpendicular to the object's axis.
      3. A sudden, sharp twist or pull
      1. A sudden, sharp pain; twinge
      2. A sudden, quick motion, esp. a spasmodic one; tic
      3. A quick, slight jerk
      1. A contest; a struggle:
      2. A land, air, or space vehicle that moves or tows other vehicles:
      3. An act or instance of tugging; hard pull
      1. A clasp, catch, or other fastening device that operates with a snapping sound.
      2. A thin, crisp, usually circular cookie:
      3. A snap bean.
      1. (Slang) A foolish, rude, or contemptible person.
      2. (Weight Lifting) A lift in which the barbell is raised upward from shoulder level with the arms completely extended
      3. A sharp, abrupt movement; quick pull, twist, push, etc.
    See also:

    push

    move

Another word for lurch

Verb
      1. To incline or bend to one side; veer:
      2. (Old Poet.) To rule; reign; hold sway
      3. (Nautical) To hoist (a mast or yard) into position.
      1. To twist or interlace (something) into, through, or among
      2. To interweave or combine (elements) into a complex whole:
      3. To form (threads) into a fabric
      1. (Sports) To arrange (the start of a race) with the starting point in the outside lanes progressively closer to the finish line so as to neutralize the advantage of competing in the shorter inside lanes.
      2. To arrange (the wings of a biplane) so that the leading edge of one wing is either ahead of or behind the leading edge of the other wing.
      3. To move unsteadily, as though about to collapse; totter, sway, or reel, as from a blow, fatigue, drunkenness, etc.
    See also:

    reel

Idioms:

    leave in the lurch