Virus synonyms

vī'rəs
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The quality or state of being sick or diseased; illness; disease or malady.
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(Microbiology, virology) A virus that is parasitic to bacteria.
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The quality of being communicable
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A particular destructive process in an organ or organism, with a specific cause and characteristic symptoms; specif., an illness; ailment
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A substance that is harmful or lethal to a living organism.
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The definition of contagion is an infectious disease spread through contact, or the transmission of a disease from one person to another through contact, or the spread of a bad or harmful idea or practice.
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An infectious disease:
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The earliest form of an organism; a seed, bud, or spore.
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(Dated) Poison, especially any of several poisonous plants
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Any of various similar poisons, related to proteins, formed in certain plants, as ricin, or secreted by certain animals, as snake venom: toxins, when injected into animals or humans, typically initiate the formation of antitoxins
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An organism or infectious agent of microscopic or submicroscopic size, especially a bacterium or protozoan.
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(Figuratively) Feeling or speech marked by spite or malice.
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Poor health resulting from disease of body or mind; sickness.
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A source of spreading corruption or decay.
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The illness or disease so produced:
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In the same way as viruses harm peoples' bodies, computer viruses can do considerable damage to computer systems. Viruses are infections. Computer infections can come in several forms and your computer can "catch" one in several ways:
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Any of a genus (Bacillus) of rod-shaped bacteria that occur in chains, produce spores, and are active only in the presence of oxygen
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(--- Archaic) A person employed to help, especially a farm worker or domestic servant.
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Can be a harmful, self-replicating program usually hidden in another piece of computer code, such as an email message. However, some virus infections are purely host-based, so they do their “black magic” only locally. Can be a harmful, self-replicating program usually hidden in another piece of computer code, such as an email message. However, some virus infections are purely host-based, so they do their “black magic” only locally. Because viruses replicate across a network in a variety of ways, they can cause Denial of Service (DoS) attacks in which the victim is not specifically targeted but is an unlucky host. Depending on the type of virus, the DoS can be hardly noticeable—or it can cause a major ­disaster. A security expert and content editor for Symantec’s online magazine SecurityFocus notes that as of April 2005, Windows users had experienced more than 140,000 virus attacks, in contrast to the Macintosh Apple users who had experienced none. Some security experts maintain that Apple’s freedom from viruses is caused by a lack of critical mass, but Symantec’s expert thinks it is a combination of Apple’s OS X operating system and its three-tiered user-privilege system—(i) user, (ii) GUI superuser, and (iii) root—that is disabled by default. Perhaps that is why, says the Symantec security professional, that Apple experiences a 70% year-over-year growth in ­revenues. Goldberg, I. Glossary of Information Warfare Terms. [Online, October 27, 2003.] Institute for the Advanced Study of Information Warfare. http://www.psycom.net/iwar.2 .html; Martin, K. Apple’s Big Virus. [Online, April 21, 2005.] Reg SETI Group Website. http:// www.theregister.co.uk/2005/04/21/apples_big_virus/; TechTarget. Denial of Service. [Online, May 16, 2001.] TechTarget Website. http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid14_ gci213591,00.htm.
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Can be a harmful, self-replicating program usually hidden in another piece of computer code, such as an email message. However, some virus infections are purely host-based, so they do their “black magic” only locally. Can be a harmful, self-replicating program usually hidden in another piece of computer code, such as an email message. However, some virus infections are purely host-based, so they do their “black magic” only locally. Because viruses replicate across a network in a variety of ways, they can cause Denial of Service (DoS) attacks in which the victim is not specifically targeted but is an unlucky host. Depending on the type of virus, the DoS can be hardly noticeable—or it can cause a major ­disaster. A security expert and content editor for Symantec’s online magazine SecurityFocus notes that as of April 2005, Windows users had experienced more than 140,000 virus attacks, in contrast to the Macintosh Apple users who had experienced none. Some security experts maintain that Apple’s freedom from viruses is caused by a lack of critical mass, but Symantec’s expert thinks it is a combination of Apple’s OS X operating system and its three-tiered user-privilege system—(i) user, (ii) GUI superuser, and (iii) root—that is disabled by default. Perhaps that is why, says the Symantec security professional, that Apple experiences a 70% year-over-year growth in ­revenues. Goldberg, I. Glossary of Information Warfare Terms. [Online, October 27, 2003.] Institute for the Advanced Study of Information Warfare. http://www.psycom.net/iwar.2 .html; Martin, K. Apple’s Big Virus. [Online, April 21, 2005.] Reg SETI Group Website. http:// www.theregister.co.uk/2005/04/21/apples_big_virus/; TechTarget. Denial of Service. [Online, May 16, 2001.] TechTarget Website. http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid14_ gci213591,00.htm.
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To dig or pull out by the roots. Often used with up or out :
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Can be a harmful, self-replicating program usually hidden in another piece of computer code, such as an email message. However, some virus infections are purely host-based, so they do their “black magic” only locally. Can be a harmful, self-replicating program usually hidden in another piece of computer code, such as an email message. However, some virus infections are purely host-based, so they do their “black magic” only locally. Because viruses replicate across a network in a variety of ways, they can cause Denial of Service (DoS) attacks in which the victim is not specifically targeted but is an unlucky host. Depending on the type of virus, the DoS can be hardly noticeable—or it can cause a major ­disaster. A security expert and content editor for Symantec’s online magazine SecurityFocus notes that as of April 2005, Windows users had experienced more than 140,000 virus attacks, in contrast to the Macintosh Apple users who had experienced none. Some security experts maintain that Apple’s freedom from viruses is caused by a lack of critical mass, but Symantec’s expert thinks it is a combination of Apple’s OS X operating system and its three-tiered user-privilege system—(i) user, (ii) GUI superuser, and (iii) root—that is disabled by default. Perhaps that is why, says the Symantec security professional, that Apple experiences a 70% year-over-year growth in ­revenues. Goldberg, I. Glossary of Information Warfare Terms. [Online, October 27, 2003.] Institute for the Advanced Study of Information Warfare. http://www.psycom.net/iwar.2 .html; Martin, K. Apple’s Big Virus. [Online, April 21, 2005.] Reg SETI Group Website. http:// www.theregister.co.uk/2005/04/21/apples_big_virus/; TechTarget. Denial of Service. [Online, May 16, 2001.] TechTarget Website. http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid14_ gci213591,00.htm.
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Find another word for virus. In this page you can discover 23 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for virus, like: sickness, phage, communicability, disease, poison, contagion, infection, germ, bane, toxin and microorganism.