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Size synonyms

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The space, amount, or degree to which a thing extends; size; length; breadth
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  1. The space, amount, or degree to which a thing extends; size; length; breadth
  2. The range, magnitude, or distance over which a thing extends:
  3. An extensive space or area:
Scope or extent, as of an operation
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  1. Scope or extent, as of an operation
  2. A distinct part or section, as of a building, set aside for a specific function:
  3. A surface, especially an open, unoccupied piece of ground:
Extent or magnitude; scope:
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  1. Extent or magnitude; scope:
  2. A measure of spatial extent, especially width, height, or length.
  3. Extent, size, or degree
A distinct mass or portion of matter, especially a large one:
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  1. A distinct mass or portion of matter, especially a large one:
  2. Size, mass, or volume, especially when very large.
  3. The main mass or body of something; largest part or portion
The quality of not being limited or constrained; having great scope.
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  1. The quality of not being limited or constrained; having great scope.
  2. The property of being physically large.
The space, amount, or degree to which a thing extends; size; length; breadth
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  1. The space, amount, or degree to which a thing extends; size; length; breadth
  2. The range, magnitude, or distance over which a thing extends:
  3. An extensive space or area:
(Countable) Something vast.
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  1. (Countable) Something vast.
  2. (Uncountable) The quality of being vast.
(Electronics) The amount by which a voltage or current changes from zero or an average value.
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  1. (Electronics) The amount by which a voltage or current changes from zero or an average value.
  2. (Physics) The maximum absolute value of a periodically varying quantity.
  3. The angle made with the positive horizontal axis by the vector representation of a complex number.
The extent of the mind's grasp; range of perception or understanding
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  1. The extent of the mind's grasp; range of perception or understanding
  2. The range or extent of action, inquiry, etc., or of an activity, concept, etc.
  3. The extent of a given activity or subject that is involved, treated, or relevant:
Infinite space or being
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  1. Infinite space or being
  2. An immense object.
  3. Great size or limitless extent
The quality of passing all moral bounds; excessive wickedness or outrageousness.
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  1. The quality of passing all moral bounds; excessive wickedness or outrageousness.
  2. (Usage Problem) Great size; immensity.
  3. Enormous size or extent; vastness
An achieved level; status.
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  1. An achieved level; status.
  2. Development, growth, or level of attainment, esp. as worthy of esteem
  3. The height of a person, or sometimes an animal, in a natural standing position
The quality of being capacious.
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The quality of being huge; immensity or enormity
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(Art) An effect of unity and inclusiveness achieved as by subordinating details
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  1. (Art) An effect of unity and inclusiveness achieved as by subordinating details
  2. Extent or scope, esp. when broad or ample
  3. A piece usually produced in a standard width:
The physical matter of which a thing consists; material
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  1. The physical matter of which a thing consists; material
  2. The real or essential part or element of anything; essence, reality, or basic matter
  3. That which has mass and occupies space; matter.
Amount; quantity:
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  1. Amount; quantity:
  2. The amount of space occupied by a three-dimensional object or region of space. Volumes are expressed in cubic units.
  3. A quantity, bulk, mass, or amount
The characteristic of being big.
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  1. The characteristic of being big.
The style of a prince, princess or someone of equivalent rank.
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  1. The style of a prince, princess or someone of equivalent rank.
  2. The quality or state of being high; height; loftiness
  3. Used with His, Her, or Your as a title and form of address for a prince or princess:
(Physics) The quantity of matter in a body as measured by its inertia; the ratio of force to the acceleration produced by that force: the gravitational force on an object is proportional to its mass
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  1. (Physics) The quantity of matter in a body as measured by its inertia; the ratio of force to the acceleration produced by that force: the gravitational force on an object is proportional to its mass
  2. A large but nonspecific amount or number:
  3. A lump or aggregate of coherent material:
(Commerce) An amount on an invoice calculated by multiplying quantity by price
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  1. (Commerce) An amount on an invoice calculated by multiplying quantity by price
  2. The amount or degree to which something is or can be extended; range; extent
  3. Any of the telephones connected to a PBX or other telephone system, each having a number assigned for direct calling; also, the number so assigned
(Physics) time-averaged energy flux (the ratio of average power to the area through which the power "flows"); irradiance
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  1. (Physics) time-averaged energy flux (the ratio of average power to the area through which the power "flows"); irradiance
  2. (Physics) The amount or degree of strength of electricity, light, heat, or sound per unit area or volume.
  3. Degree or extent; relative strength, magnitude, vigor, etc.
The power of receiving and holding knowledge, impressions, etc.; mental ability
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  1. The power of receiving and holding knowledge, impressions, etc.; mental ability
  2. The amount of space that can be filled; room for holding; content or volume
  3. The maximum amount that can be contained:
The comparative relation between parts, things, or elements with respect to size, amount, degree, etc.; ratio
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  1. The comparative relation between parts, things, or elements with respect to size, amount, degree, etc.; ratio
  2. A part or amount considered in relation to a whole:
  3. Size, degree, or extent relative to a standard
(Math.) A number, usually an integer, representing the geometric dimensions of some physical or abstract system
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  1. (Math.) A number, usually an integer, representing the geometric dimensions of some physical or abstract system
  2. Extent or magnitude; scope:
  3. Extent, size, or degree
The degree to which a thing extends:
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  1. The degree to which a thing extends:
  2. The range, magnitude, or distance over which a thing extends:
  3. An extensive space or area:
Greatness in size or extent:
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  1. Greatness in size or extent:
  2. (Math.) A number given to a quantity for purposes of comparison with other quantities of the same class
  3. Of extent
The act or process of determining extent, dimensions, etc.; measurement
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  1. The act or process of determining extent, dimensions, etc.; measurement
  2. A fitting amount:
  3. A standard for determining extent, dimensions, etc.; unit of measurement, as an inch, yard, or bushel
The comparative relation between parts, things, or elements with respect to size, amount, degree, etc.; ratio
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  1. The comparative relation between parts, things, or elements with respect to size, amount, degree, etc.; ratio
  2. A part or amount considered in relation to a whole:
  3. Size, degree, or extent relative to a standard
Greatness of size; magnitude.
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  1. Greatness of size; magnitude.
  2. The angle made with the positive horizontal axis by the vector representation of a complex number.
  3. (Physics) The maximum absolute value of a periodically varying quantity.
The characteristic of being big.
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  1. The characteristic of being big.
The quality of not being limited or constrained; having great scope.
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  1. The quality of not being limited or constrained; having great scope.
  2. The property of being physically large.
The degree of brightness of a star or other celestial body, measured on a logarithmic scale in which lower numbers mean greater brightness, such that a decrease of one unit represents an increase in brightness by a factor of 2.512. An object that is 5 units less than another object on the magnitude scale is 100 times more luminous. Because of refinements in measurement after the zero point was assigned, very bright objects have negative magnitudes. &diamf3; The brightness of a celestial body as seen from Earth is called its apparent magnitude . (When unspecified, an object's magnitude is normally assumed to be its apparent magnitude.) The dimmest stars visible to the unaided eye have apparent magnitude 6, while the brightest star in the night sky, Sirius, has apparent magnitude −1.4. The full Moon and the Sun have apparent magnitudes of −12.7 and −26.8 respectively. &diamf3; The brightness of a celestial body computed as if viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.6 light-years) is called its absolute magnitude . Absolute magnitude measures the intrinsic brightness of a celestial object rather than how bright it appears on Earth, using the same logarithmic scale as for apparent magnitude. Sirius has an absolute magnitude of 1.5, considerably dimmer than Rigel which, though its apparent magnitude is 0.12, has an absolute magnitude of −8.1. Stars that appear dim in the night sky but have bright absolute magnitudes are much farther from Earth than stars that shine brightly at night but have relatively dim absolute magnitudes. The Sun, a star of only medium brightness, has an absolute magnitude of 4.8. &diamf3; The degree of total radiation emitted by a celestial body, including all infrared and ultraviolet radiation in addition to visible light, is called its bolometric magnitude . Bolometric magnitude is generally measured by applying a standard correction to an object's absolute magnitude.
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  1. The degree of brightness of a star or other celestial body, measured on a logarithmic scale in which lower numbers mean greater brightness, such that a decrease of one unit represents an increase in brightness by a factor of 2.512. An object that is 5 units less than another object on the magnitude scale is 100 times more luminous. Because of refinements in measurement after the zero point was assigned, very bright objects have negative magnitudes. &diamf3; The brightness of a celestial body as seen from Earth is called its apparent magnitude . (When unspecified, an object's magnitude is normally assumed to be its apparent magnitude.) The dimmest stars visible to the unaided eye have apparent magnitude 6, while the brightest star in the night sky, Sirius, has apparent magnitude −1.4. The full Moon and the Sun have apparent magnitudes of −12.7 and −26.8 respectively. &diamf3; The brightness of a celestial body computed as if viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.6 light-years) is called its absolute magnitude . Absolute magnitude measures the intrinsic brightness of a celestial object rather than how bright it appears on Earth, using the same logarithmic scale as for apparent magnitude. Sirius has an absolute magnitude of 1.5, considerably dimmer than Rigel which, though its apparent magnitude is 0.12, has an absolute magnitude of −8.1. Stars that appear dim in the night sky but have bright absolute magnitudes are much farther from Earth than stars that shine brightly at night but have relatively dim absolute magnitudes. The Sun, a star of only medium brightness, has an absolute magnitude of 4.8. &diamf3; The degree of total radiation emitted by a celestial body, including all infrared and ultraviolet radiation in addition to visible light, is called its bolometric magnitude . Bolometric magnitude is generally measured by applying a standard correction to an object's absolute magnitude.
  2. Greatness in significance or influence:
  3. Greatness
(Physics) The maximum absolute value of a periodically varying quantity.
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  1. (Physics) The maximum absolute value of a periodically varying quantity.
  2. (Physics) One half the full extent of a vibration, oscillation, or wave. The amplitude of an ocean wave is the maximum height of the wave crest above the level of calm water, or the maximum depth of the wave trough below the level of calm water. The amplitude of a pendulum swinging through an angle of 90° is 45°.
  3. The angle made with the positive horizontal axis by the vector representation of a complex number.
A distinct mass or portion of matter, especially a large one:
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  1. A distinct mass or portion of matter, especially a large one:
  2. The main mass or body of something; largest part or portion
  3. Size, mass, or volume, especially when very large.
Greatness in size or extent:
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  1. Greatness in size or extent:
  2. The degree of brightness of a star or other celestial body, measured on a logarithmic scale in which lower numbers mean greater brightness, such that a decrease of one unit represents an increase in brightness by a factor of 2.512. An object that is 5 units less than another object on the magnitude scale is 100 times more luminous. Because of refinements in measurement after the zero point was assigned, very bright objects have negative magnitudes. &diamf3; The brightness of a celestial body as seen from Earth is called its apparent magnitude . (When unspecified, an object's magnitude is normally assumed to be its apparent magnitude.) The dimmest stars visible to the unaided eye have apparent magnitude 6, while the brightest star in the night sky, Sirius, has apparent magnitude −1.4. The full Moon and the Sun have apparent magnitudes of −12.7 and −26.8 respectively. &diamf3; The brightness of a celestial body computed as if viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.6 light-years) is called its absolute magnitude . Absolute magnitude measures the intrinsic brightness of a celestial object rather than how bright it appears on Earth, using the same logarithmic scale as for apparent magnitude. Sirius has an absolute magnitude of 1.5, considerably dimmer than Rigel which, though its apparent magnitude is 0.12, has an absolute magnitude of −8.1. Stars that appear dim in the night sky but have bright absolute magnitudes are much farther from Earth than stars that shine brightly at night but have relatively dim absolute magnitudes. The Sun, a star of only medium brightness, has an absolute magnitude of 4.8. &diamf3; The degree of total radiation emitted by a celestial body, including all infrared and ultraviolet radiation in addition to visible light, is called its bolometric magnitude . Bolometric magnitude is generally measured by applying a standard correction to an object's absolute magnitude.
  3. A property that can be described by a real number, such as the volume of a sphere or the length of a vector.
(Physics) The quantity of matter in a body as measured by its inertia; the ratio of force to the acceleration produced by that force: the gravitational force on an object is proportional to its mass
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  1. (Physics) The quantity of matter in a body as measured by its inertia; the ratio of force to the acceleration produced by that force: the gravitational force on an object is proportional to its mass
  2. The physical volume or bulk of a solid body.
  3. A lump or aggregate of coherent material:
A collection of written or printed sheets bound together; a book.
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  1. A collection of written or printed sheets bound together; a book.
  2. A quantity, bulk, mass, or amount
  3. Amount; quantity:
Find another word for size. In this page you can discover 48 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for size, like: extent, area, dimension, bulk, largeness, greatness, extent, vastness, amplitude, scope and immensity.