Log subsystem synonyms

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A person appointed by the court to manage a part or all of the assets and liabilities of an intestate or of a testator who has no executor. In many states, the person can be a man or a woman, but in the others, the term refers to a male, while a female who is appointed to perform these duties is called an administratrix. See also administrator ad litem and ancillary administrator.
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A guardian spirit; inspiring or inner spirit
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System administrators must analyze numerous types of log entries not only from multitudes of sub-systems within each system but also from multitudes of systems in order to detect system intrusions. For example, an FTP server will write an entry for every connection it gets, the kernel will generate entries for failures of hardware (such as in a disk drive), and a DNS server might regularly report usage statistics. Some of these log entries might require the immediate attention of a system administrator or of someone having expertise in a particular type. Still other entries simply need to be recorded for future reference. To deal with these important matters, most UNIX systems have a log sub-system facility called Syslog, implemented as a daemon program named “Syslogd.” This program listens for messages on a socket called /dev/log. System administrators must analyze numerous types of log entries not only from multitudes of sub-systems within each system but also from multitudes of systems in order to detect system intrusions. For example, an FTP server will write an entry for every connection it gets, the kernel will generate entries for failures of hardware (such as in a disk drive), and a DNS server might regularly report usage statistics. Some of these log entries might require the immediate attention of a system administrator or of someone having expertise in a particular type. Still other entries simply need to be recorded for future reference. To deal with these important matters, most UNIX systems have a log sub-system facility called Syslog, implemented as a daemon program named “Syslogd.” This program listens for messages on a socket called /dev/log. By classifying information in the entries and in the contents of the config file (typically /etc/syslog.conf), Syslogd routes the information—such as “print to the system console,” “mail to a specific user,” “create entry in a logfile,” “forward to another daemon,” or “discard.” Syslogd can also listen for information on the Syslog UDP port and on the local socket. Though Syslogd can operate on information from the operating system, the kernel does not write to /dev/log. Instead, another daemon (named Klogd) receives information from the kernel and forwards it to Syslogd. Syslogd must receive a two-part classfication piece of information from each process consisting of “facility” and “priority.” A facility/priority number is one indicating both the facility and the priority. Facility ascertains the source—such as the kernel, the mail subsystem, or an FTP server. Priority ascertains the importance of the contents—such as debug, informational, warning, or critical. Except for the fact that priorities have a defined order, the real meaning of these is determined by the system administrator. GNU Organization. Overview of Syslog. [Online, 2004.] GNU Organization Website. http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Overview-of-Syslog.html.
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System administrators must analyze numerous types of log entries not only from multitudes of sub-systems within each system but also from multitudes of systems in order to detect system intrusions. For example, an FTP server will write an entry for every connection it gets, the kernel will generate entries for failures of hardware (such as in a disk drive), and a DNS server might regularly report usage statistics. Some of these log entries might require the immediate attention of a system administrator or of someone having expertise in a particular type. Still other entries simply need to be recorded for future reference. To deal with these important matters, most UNIX systems have a log sub-system facility called Syslog, implemented as a daemon program named “Syslogd.” This program listens for messages on a socket called /dev/log. System administrators must analyze numerous types of log entries not only from multitudes of sub-systems within each system but also from multitudes of systems in order to detect system intrusions. For example, an FTP server will write an entry for every connection it gets, the kernel will generate entries for failures of hardware (such as in a disk drive), and a DNS server might regularly report usage statistics. Some of these log entries might require the immediate attention of a system administrator or of someone having expertise in a particular type. Still other entries simply need to be recorded for future reference. To deal with these important matters, most UNIX systems have a log sub-system facility called Syslog, implemented as a daemon program named “Syslogd.” This program listens for messages on a socket called /dev/log. By classifying information in the entries and in the contents of the config file (typically /etc/syslog.conf), Syslogd routes the information—such as “print to the system console,” “mail to a specific user,” “create entry in a logfile,” “forward to another daemon,” or “discard.” Syslogd can also listen for information on the Syslog UDP port and on the local socket. Though Syslogd can operate on information from the operating system, the kernel does not write to /dev/log. Instead, another daemon (named Klogd) receives information from the kernel and forwards it to Syslogd. Syslogd must receive a two-part classfication piece of information from each process consisting of “facility” and “priority.” A facility/priority number is one indicating both the facility and the priority. Facility ascertains the source—such as the kernel, the mail subsystem, or an FTP server. Priority ascertains the importance of the contents—such as debug, informational, warning, or critical. Except for the fact that priorities have a defined order, the real meaning of these is determined by the system administrator. GNU Organization. Overview of Syslog. [Online, 2004.] GNU Organization Website. http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Overview-of-Syslog.html.
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System administrators must analyze numerous types of log entries not only from multitudes of sub-systems within each system but also from multitudes of systems in order to detect system intrusions. For example, an FTP server will write an entry for every connection it gets, the kernel will generate entries for failures of hardware (such as in a disk drive), and a DNS server might regularly report usage statistics. Some of these log entries might require the immediate attention of a system administrator or of someone having expertise in a particular type. Still other entries simply need to be recorded for future reference. To deal with these important matters, most UNIX systems have a log sub-system facility called Syslog, implemented as a daemon program named “Syslogd.” This program listens for messages on a socket called /dev/log. System administrators must analyze numerous types of log entries not only from multitudes of sub-systems within each system but also from multitudes of systems in order to detect system intrusions. For example, an FTP server will write an entry for every connection it gets, the kernel will generate entries for failures of hardware (such as in a disk drive), and a DNS server might regularly report usage statistics. Some of these log entries might require the immediate attention of a system administrator or of someone having expertise in a particular type. Still other entries simply need to be recorded for future reference. To deal with these important matters, most UNIX systems have a log sub-system facility called Syslog, implemented as a daemon program named “Syslogd.” This program listens for messages on a socket called /dev/log. By classifying information in the entries and in the contents of the config file (typically /etc/syslog.conf), Syslogd routes the information—such as “print to the system console,” “mail to a specific user,” “create entry in a logfile,” “forward to another daemon,” or “discard.” Syslogd can also listen for information on the Syslog UDP port and on the local socket. Though Syslogd can operate on information from the operating system, the kernel does not write to /dev/log. Instead, another daemon (named Klogd) receives information from the kernel and forwards it to Syslogd. Syslogd must receive a two-part classfication piece of information from each process consisting of “facility” and “priority.” A facility/priority number is one indicating both the facility and the priority. Facility ascertains the source—such as the kernel, the mail subsystem, or an FTP server. Priority ascertains the importance of the contents—such as debug, informational, warning, or critical. Except for the fact that priorities have a defined order, the real meaning of these is determined by the system administrator. GNU Organization. Overview of Syslog. [Online, 2004.] GNU Organization Website. http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Overview-of-Syslog.html.
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(Computing) The central part of many computer operating systems which manages the system's resources and the communication between hardware and software components.
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(Computing) A file that serves as a log.
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To furnish with or fit into a socket
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A trademark for a computer operating system that allows multiple simultaneous users.
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System administrators must analyze numerous types of log entries not only from multitudes of sub-systems within each system but also from multitudes of systems in order to detect system intrusions. For example, an FTP server will write an entry for every connection it gets, the kernel will generate entries for failures of hardware (such as in a disk drive), and a DNS server might regularly report usage statistics. Some of these log entries might require the immediate attention of a system administrator or of someone having expertise in a particular type. Still other entries simply need to be recorded for future reference. To deal with these important matters, most UNIX systems have a log sub-system facility called Syslog, implemented as a daemon program named “Syslogd.” This program listens for messages on a socket called /dev/log. System administrators must analyze numerous types of log entries not only from multitudes of sub-systems within each system but also from multitudes of systems in order to detect system intrusions. For example, an FTP server will write an entry for every connection it gets, the kernel will generate entries for failures of hardware (such as in a disk drive), and a DNS server might regularly report usage statistics. Some of these log entries might require the immediate attention of a system administrator or of someone having expertise in a particular type. Still other entries simply need to be recorded for future reference. To deal with these important matters, most UNIX systems have a log sub-system facility called Syslog, implemented as a daemon program named “Syslogd.” This program listens for messages on a socket called /dev/log. By classifying information in the entries and in the contents of the config file (typically /etc/syslog.conf), Syslogd routes the information—such as “print to the system console,” “mail to a specific user,” “create entry in a logfile,” “forward to another daemon,” or “discard.” Syslogd can also listen for information on the Syslog UDP port and on the local socket. Though Syslogd can operate on information from the operating system, the kernel does not write to /dev/log. Instead, another daemon (named Klogd) receives information from the kernel and forwards it to Syslogd. Syslogd must receive a two-part classfication piece of information from each process consisting of “facility” and “priority.” A facility/priority number is one indicating both the facility and the priority. Facility ascertains the source—such as the kernel, the mail subsystem, or an FTP server. Priority ascertains the importance of the contents—such as debug, informational, warning, or critical. Except for the fact that priorities have a defined order, the real meaning of these is determined by the system administrator. GNU Organization. Overview of Syslog. [Online, 2004.] GNU Organization Website. http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Overview-of-Syslog.html.
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Find another word for log subsystem. In this page you can discover 10 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for log subsystem, like: administrator, daemon, domain name system (dns), /etc/syslog.conf, ftp (file transfer protocol), kernel, logfile, socket, unix and user datagram protocol (udp).